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Index for automatic admission

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I spoke with the admissions office and they let me know that the index score for automatic admission for this year is 905.

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I spoke with the admissions office and they let me know that the index score for automatic admission for this year is 905.

Are you serious???! Wow. Past years it has been 930 unless they changed the index formula when they changed the admission assessment from 70-30 gpa to 50-50. But I would imagine they would change the formula in a relative manner so the index scores would be the same.

 

Well this bodes well for my 897 index

Edited by NHH

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Are you serious???! Wow. Past years it has been 930 unless they changed the index formula when they changed the admission assessment from 70-30 gpa to 50-50. But I would imagine they would change the formula in a relative manner so the index scores would be the same.

 

Well this bodes well for my 897 index

I was quite surprised as well! But I'm not sure if it was always like this but they seem to be just looking at your letter grade even if your school does the 4.33 GPA breakdown. So for instance if you get 70% or 74%, they'll just count it as 3.00. (which for a lot of people, brings their GPA down if you have a lot of marks in the higher range of each letter grade)

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I emailed UVIC myself to get an update and I can confirm 905 is the cutoff for auto acceptance this year and they are using the same formula to calculate it which means there must be a decline in competition or applicants this year.

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Would you mind sharing the index formula with us? I know it's on here somewhere but couldn't find it.

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Would you mind sharing the index formula with us? I know it's on here somewhere but couldn't find it.

The new index formula is (GPA out of 4.33 x 125) + (LSAT percentile x 5)

 

So for example..

 

(4.0 x 125) + (90 x 5)

(500 + 450) = 950

 

 Hence automatic entry for that lucky individual.

Edited by NHH
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Well, that makes me feel better. I wonder if this is a response to the supposed increase in LSAT difficulty (I personally think it was a bit harder than in past years, but not significantly) or if there's actually been a drop in competition. I figured that with all the good press UVic has gotten lately, the competition would have increased.

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Well, that makes me feel better. I wonder if this is a response to the supposed increase in LSAT difficulty (I personally think it was a bit harder than in past years, but not significantly) or if there's actually been a drop in competition. I figured that with all the good press UVic has gotten lately, the competition would have increased.

This is a bit misleading; an increase in LSAT difficulty does not, and should not correlate to a decrease in the index cutoff.  The reason is because the LSAT is a normalized examination, if it is particularly hard, the overall marks stay the same (because thats how scaling works).  Everyone takes the same exam.

 

On the other hand, the number of people taking the LSAT is slowly dwindling, and it is possible this year was just weaker (not less intelligent by any means!) or less competitive than usual.

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Oh wow this is great news. I thought I was a borderline applicant with 908 index score after checking out last year's acceptance thread.

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Probably posting this in the wrong thread, but I'll ask anyway. Due to a recent interest in UVic Law, I was wondering how the index is calculated exactly.

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People aren't confident, as it hasn't actually been officially released.

Also the info is everywhere.

But people are assuming its 5x LSAT percentage (max of 99.9991% of course), + 125x cgpa number value.

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People aren't confident, as it hasn't actually been officially released.

 

Also the info is everywhere.

 

But people are assuming its 5x LSAT percentage (max of 99.9991% of course), + 125x cgpa number value.

There's a 99% chance that is the formula however. A few people on the forum have calculated their index using that formula and been given the same index by uvic law admissions, one of those people is myself. Edited by NHH

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I Just calculated mine at 900, I am seriously considering taking a year to stay in BC since I missed this application cycle due to a February LSAT. I could up my GPA a bit and re take the lsat, but might not even have to (LSAT). What has been the consistent trend in admissions index scores?

 

UVIC drops 6 courses correct?

Edited by Hobz

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I Just calculated mine at 900, I am seriously considering taking a year to stay in BC since I missed this application cycle due to a February LSAT. I could up my GPA a bit and re take the lsat, but might not even have to (LSAT). What has been the consistent trend in admissions index scores?

 

UVIC drops 6 courses correct?

People with like 907s got in early spring so you're close.

Boost your LSAT up one point and you'll be automatically in.

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People with like 907s got in early spring so you're close.

Boost your LSAT up one point and you'll be automatically in.

Is this the norm from year to year? around a 907? I just don't want to hold out and then have it be way higher next year... I could definitely boost my LSAT and I need to take a couple extra courses to finish my degree anyway in which I know I can get an A minimum. 

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Is this the norm from year to year? around a 907? I just don't want to hold out and then have it be way higher next year... I could definitely boost my LSAT and I need to take a couple extra courses to finish my degree anyway in which I know I can get an A minimum.

Not the norm or average, but people were accepted with stats around there already and I would reckon a 900 would get an applicant in off the waitlist.

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Hobz, for reference: the index score for this year was surprisingly low, with previous year "index scores" being closer to 930-945 as per previous threads.

To my understanding- you are NOT on the waitlist (as you did not apply).

900 is not low by any means, and might still get you in.  That being said: certainly no guarantee.

If you are interested in rewriting, I'd say go for it if time and motivation permits.

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Hobz, for reference: the index score for this year was surprisingly low, with previous year "index scores" being closer to 930-945 as per previous threads.

 

To my understanding- you are NOT on the waitlist (as you did not apply).

 

900 is not low by any means, and might still get you in.  That being said: certainly no guarantee.

 

If you are interested in rewriting, I'd say go for it if time and motivation permits.

I have not applied I would be waiting until next year, however, I thought they changed the index formula. And heard they changed the LSAT/GPA ratio to 50/50 resulting in a change in index scores?

 

I could most likely get it to the 920 range by next year as well.

Edited by Hobz

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I have not applied I would be waiting until next year, however, I thought they changed the index formula. And heard they changed the LSAT/GPA ratio to 50/50 resulting in a change in index scores?

 

I could most likely get it to the 920 range by next year as well.

Sort of. They didn't change the index formula. They changed the admissions from 70/30 to 50/50 which caused the index formula to change.

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