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mtl31

French Test

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Hi everyone!

I know this subject has been talked about a lot in the forum, but has anyone written the test recently? Any tips? Thank you!

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I was a student at UdeM recently, and everyone who did not have an undergrad degree from a french-speaking university had to write it. It's your choice of topics of a list of 5. They don't care about what you write about, they're only looking for mistakes then they take off marks. Depending on how many mistakes you make you don't pass the test. You still get accepted and all that, you just have to take a full-year french course with the undergrads. There are normally around 12 people of the 50 first years in it. It's not difficult, just a burden to have another full-year course on top of your others. You have to get a C+ in it before you get your degree. So if you don't pass the french class your first year, you just take it again 2nd year and 3rd year until you pass it, then you get your degree.

 

YOU STILL GET ACCEPTED TO THE LAW SCHOOL IF YOU FAIL THE FRENCH TEST!!!! The only repercussion is haveing to take FR 1200 and Fr 1600.

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I was a student at UdeM recently, and everyone who did not have an undergrad degree from a french-speaking university had to write it. It's your choice of topics of a list of 5. They don't care about what you write about, they're only looking for mistakes then they take off marks. Depending on how many mistakes you make you don't pass the test. You still get accepted and all that, you just have to take a full-year french course with the undergrads. There are normally around 12 people of the 50 first years in it. It's not difficult, just a burden to have another full-year course on top of your others. You have to get a C+ in it before you get your degree. So if you don't pass the french class your first year, you just take it again 2nd year and 3rd year until you pass it, then you get your degree.

 

YOU STILL GET ACCEPTED TO THE LAW SCHOOL IF YOU FAIL THE FRENCH TEST!!!! The only repercussion is haveing to take FR 1200 and Fr 1600.

 

Inaccurate.  You need at least a C to qualify for the course.  A C+ or higher would exempt you completely. 

Edited by HopingHopper

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I was a student at UdeM recently, and everyone who did not have an undergrad degree from a french-speaking university had to write it. It's your choice of topics of a list of 5. They don't care about what you write about, they're only looking for mistakes then they take off marks. Depending on how many mistakes you make you don't pass the test. You still get accepted and all that, you just have to take a full-year french course with the undergrads. There are normally around 12 people of the 50 first years in it. It's not difficult, just a burden to have another full-year course on top of your others. You have to get a C+ in it before you get your degree. So if you don't pass the french class your first year, you just take it again 2nd year and 3rd year until you pass it, then you get your degree.

 

YOU STILL GET ACCEPTED TO THE LAW SCHOOL IF YOU FAIL THE FRENCH TEST!!!! The only repercussion is haveing to take FR 1200 and Fr 1600.

 

As per the universities website, It seems that in some cases, candidates will have the opportunity to write.

 

"Before they can be admitted, they must pass a written French test with a minimum grade of C+.

 

In some cases, candidates who have not obtained the minimum grade on the French test will be admitted with a requirement that they take and pass a certain number of French courses. Such students are, or course, required to pursue their law studies in French during this time and to write papers and exams in French. These courses are not credited toward the law degree, and obtaining the degree is conditional upon obtaining the minimum grade of C+ on such courses."

Edited by moimeme

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As per the universities website, It seems that in some cases, candidates will have the opportunity to write.

 

"Before they can be admitted, they must pass a written French test with a minimum grade of C+.

 

In some cases, candidates who have not obtained the minimum grade on the French test will be admitted with a requirement that they take and pass a certain number of French courses. Such students are, or course, required to pursue their law studies in French during this time and to write papers and exams in French. These courses are not credited toward the law degree, and obtaining the degree is conditional upon obtaining the minimum grade of C+ on such courses."

 Just to add- at least a C needs to be obtained. 

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