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What Exactly do Lawyers do all day in Corporate Finance and Securities?

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Do articling students and junior associates get to draft agreements and have client contact? Or is that something you do as a more senior associate. I always thought that the juniors don't get to touch this kind of stuff.

 

It depends on where you work and how lucky you get. I had client contact and helped draft agreements in my first summer. Sometimes the fact that you work on a smaller case is a blessing in disguise because the lawyer gives you more responsibilities (and the benefit for you is the same, whether it's worth 500M or 250k). 

Edited by LivingLegend

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Do articling students and junior associates get to draft agreements and have client contact? Or is that something you do as a more senior associate. I always thought that the juniors don't get to touch this kind of stuff.

 

I can't speak to client contact, though I'm sure it happens. Juniors are definitely drafting agreements and parts of agreements.

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OP, in case you haven't seen it, there's actually a useful and accurate response to the same query you posted on lawbuzzz.

 

Koodos to IronLawyer for taking this guy seriously!

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Nvm -- I see The Simpsons "Neeeerd" has already been posted. Carry on. 

 

Edit: Well I guess speaking of Inns, one of my profs was telling me how she was trying to get into Inner Temple and was pushing on these heavy wooden doors because she couldn't open them, so she pushed and she pushed until it blew open and as she walked in she saw a man on the ground by the door. She had pushed so hard that the man who was trying to leave was thrown back. It turned out to be Lord Denning and as punishment he made her photocopy a large stack of papers.

 

True story.

Edited by Lawl

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"But... but this is just a blank ream of paper!"

"Double-sided!  By noon!"

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"OP, in case you haven't seen it, there's actually a useful and accurate response to the same query you posted on lawbuzzz."

 

JAggers,


 

Do you have a link to said discussion? Thanks!

Edited by VicGal

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the founder of the poison pill, ah yes the great Martin Lipton.  Co-founded the great New York white shoe firm Wachtel, Lipton, Rosen & Katz (reputedly the most difficult top US firm to get into).  One of the top mergers and acquisitions lawyers of his time, he developed the poison pill strategy to help boards of directors fight off tender-based hostile takeover attempts in 1982.

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the founder of the poison pill, ah yes the great Martin Lipton.  Co-founded the great New York white shoe firm Wachtel, Lipton, Rosen & Katz (reputedly the most difficult top US firm to get into).  One of the top mergers and acquisitions lawyers of his time, he developed the poison pill strategy to help boards of directors fight off tender-based hostile takeover attempts in 1982.

And for those interested, check out the ppp at his firm:

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_law_firms_by_profits_per_partner

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My understanding is that Wachtell was founded in the '60s as a rival to all of the White Shoe firms that were resistant to hiring Jewish lawyers.  Go meritocracy, eh?

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My understanding is that Wachtell was founded in the '60s as a rival to all of the White Shoe firms that were resistant to hiring Jewish lawyers.  Go meritocracy, eh?

 

According to the wiki article on the firm (citing a 2008 book on M&A history), " The firm rose to prominence during a time on Wall Street in which many brokers and investment bankers started their own small companies, but received little attention from established white-shoe law firms..." (Not that that contradicts what you were saying).

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My understanding is that Wachtell was founded in the '60s as a rival to all of the White Shoe firms that were resistant to hiring Jewish lawyers. Go meritocracy, eh?

Outliers??

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Do personal injury firms have the "bottom feeders" stigma within the Canadian legal community. At a personal injury firm, aren't you the one who represents the "little guy"? I thought that "ambulance chaser" stuff was more American.

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Do personal injury firms have the "bottom feeders" stigma within the Canadian legal community. At a personal injury firm, aren't you the one who represents the "little guy"? I thought that "ambulance chaser" stuff was more American.

 

#wrongthread? The stigma can still exist here but is probably less intensive than in the US because the US legal industry is so awful that you see more commercials, billboards and accounts of what we think of as "ambulance chasers".

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Sidebar: Litigators are respected everywhere until they do personal injury or criminal. Then you get the whole "ambulance chaser" or "bottom feeder" mentality.

 

 

#wrongthread? The stigma can still exist here but is probably less intensive than in the US because the US legal industry is so awful that you see more commercials, billboards and accounts of what we think of as "ambulance chasers".

 

No the above quote was on the first page of this thread. Forgot to quote it.

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Uriel seems to be of the opinion that solicitors have more career opportunities in front of them thanks to the relationships they build with their clients.

So I wanted to ask everyone about whether Solicitors or Barristers have more doors open to them career-wise once they leave the big firm?

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Solicitors have more solicitor doors open for them and barristers have more barrister doors open for them. There's no way to quantify that.

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Solicitors have more solicitor doors open for them and barristers have more barrister doors open for them. There's no way to quantify that.

I'm not so sure as to the impossibility of quantifying it. 

 

A pointed out by Uriel, a solicitor can find work in the business world through his contacts. It's a drastic career change that many solicitors do without much trouble.

 

A litigator who specializes in, say, bankruptcy, would have a much more difficult time transitioning into labor litigation or worse, criminal. In this regard, it seems that a litigator is more "limited" as to the scope of jobs he can take on later in his career.

 

But again, I am sure many other factors come into play.

 

I agree with you to the extent that it is impossible to scientifically quantify the number of doors open to one and the other. But I believe people in this forum have anecdotal examples of how difficult or easy it is for solicitors and barristers to find work in fields other than that they have specialized in.

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