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JusticeHopeful

Windsor Law - Peer Mentorship Program & Law School Survival Guide

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Hi Everyone,

 

Congratulations to all those accepted into the 2016 Windsor law class, and best of luck to all those hoping to be accepted. Windsor Law is a great school! I am entering my final year in the JD Program at Windsor Law, and I would be happy to answer any of your questions regarding my experience.

 

I've created this thread to alert students to the resources of the Peer Mentorship Program (PMP). The Peer Mentorship Program aims to guide newly-inducted law students and make the transition as smooth as possible. The Peer Mentorship Program is part of a larger program focused on facilitating student success, though academic planning, career development, and health and wellness. 

 

 

The Peer Mentorship Program contains two major components: the Mentee-Mentor Match Up, and the Law School Survival Guide Blog

 

 

The Mentee-Mentor Match Up

 

The Mentee-Mentor Match Up involves matching a first-year student with an upper-year student of similar interests. Your mentor will be an invaluable resource, who you can turn to for advice on both academic and non-academic topics.

 

Mentors will be assigned to all first-year law students who request to be matched with an upper-year student. To request a mentor, please fill out an application, which can be found on the Peer Mentorship website. Details on the Match-Up program and how to submit your application can be found on the website.

 

* PLEASE NOTE: Applications for Mentors have NOT been posted yet - they should be posted within the next couple of weeks. I will update this thread when they are posted.

 

The Law School Survival Guide Blog

 

The Law School Survival Guide (also on the PMP website) is a developing resource for first-year students. Throughout the summer and academic year, blog posts on a variety of topics will be posted in an attempt to answer common first-year law student questions and inform you about the many resources available at Windsor law. A snapshot of current posts on the Law School Survival Guide blog include: Summer Preparation for Law School, Housing Options in Windsor (a three part series), First-Year courses, and connecting to Windsor Law through social media. A lot of the questions coming up on Lawstudents.ca have been answered.

 

Students are welcome to email questions as topics for future blog posts to [email protected].

 

The link for the Peer Mentorship Program Website, and Law School Survival Guide is here: www.uwindsor.ca/law/peermentorshipprogram/ 

 

Cheers!

 

JusticeHopeful

 

 

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Can you explain what is meant by "matched with a student who has similar interests"? And what is the menor-mentee relationship like - do they share CANs, assist with course selection, give tips for exams, etc?

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Can you explain what is meant by "matched with a student who has similar interests"? And what is the menor-mentee relationship like - do they share CANs, assist with course selection, give tips for exams, etc?

 

Of course! Each mentee and mentor fill out an application form. The mentee checks off (from a list) topics under academic and personal umbrellas they wish to be able to discuss with their mentor. The mentor checks off what they feel qualified to discuss.

 

Students who indicate similar academic and personal interests are matched - e.g. who indicate they are in the same program, or from the same location, maybe both mature students, or both in same-sex relationships, or students who are both interested in commercial law, etc. may be matched. It is a rough-and-ready pairing, but the applications are detailed enough that students are generally happy with their matchups.

 

The mentor-mentee relationships are flexible. The mentor is not required to share CANs. Course selection is already pre-determined for first year students, although many first-year students entering their second year call their mentor (even through the mentor title ends upon the culmination of the school year) to ask for advice. Your mentor is really an excellent link to direct you to resources. They provide exam tips if you ask, and course tips, and they will be a familiar face at social events.

 

The PMP Student coordinator who heads the program will hold panels on tips to study for exams, managing stress, and other things. 

 

Please see the FAQ page for more details: http://www1.uwindsor.ca/law/peermentorshipprogram/5/frequently-asked-questions

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Any chance this can be done without using FB, or do I have to bite the bullet and sign up for facebook?

 

(I'm not keen on social media)

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JD2016, you can download the form here, not sure if facebook is necessary or not though: http://www1.uwindsor.ca/law/peermentorshipprogram/2013-07-31/mentee-mentor-applications-2013-2014

 

I was wondering how we pay our fees online. What do we put in the 'payee section' and that? Has anyone already paid? I also have to pay for residence fees, to I pay it all at the same time? Thanks.

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JD2016, you can download the form here, not sure if facebook is necessary or not though: http://www1.uwindsor.ca/law/peermentorshipprogram/2013-07-31/mentee-mentor-applications-2013-2014

 

I was wondering how we pay our fees online. What do we put in the 'payee section' and that? Has anyone already paid? I also have to pay for residence fees, to I pay it all at the same time? Thanks.

 

Isaque, I will have to look into the timeline regarding payment - you can read all the payment options here: http://www1.uwindsor.ca/cashiers/payment-options

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