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PoliSciGuy

Canadian Schools vs Harvard (if the end-game is Canadian Judicial System)

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Hey folks,

 

I'm currently entering my fourth year at U of T and am trying to decide which law school I would like to attend.  Currently, I am thinking of heading into the judicial system if possible.  In terms of becoming a judge in Canada (especially say the Supreme Court), is it necessary to attend a law school in Canada? (Particularly U of T, Osgoode, or McGill).

 

Please feel free to impart some wisdom on this matter!  Likewise, if you have any other wisdom or questions, feel free to post.

 

Thanks very much for your time!

 

I'm a 0L as well, but when I read "I am thinking of heading into the judicial system" I read it in the voice of Elle Woods.

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Unrelated question, do solicitors ever become judges?

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Unrelated question, do solicitors ever become judges?

 

Yes.

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Yes.

 

They are however required to wear My Little Pony pajamas's under their robes.

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Anecdotally, I was speaking with a Harvard Law grad on the internet on a completely different (and non-law) internet site.  I have only his say-so, but have known the guy online for years and years.

 

Anyways, he has described that on graduation he wanted to work in a public defender's office in the US, but that he faced a lot of resistance in various offices all over the US by being a Harvard grad, for example judges who would always call him, on the record "Harvard".  Ultimately though he did wind up getting a job though.

 

There are reasons why a Canadian might well want to go to Harvard Law - it certainly opens up opportunities in the US that would be unmatched by any Canadian degree.  But if you wanted to someday be a judge the far better bet would be to go to law school in Canada, and save Harvard or Oxbridge for some graduate work down the road.

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Yes.

 

I meant more how often. I know they do became judges but what would you say the breakdown is? 80/20?

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I meant more how often. I know they do became judges but what would you say the breakdown is? 80/20?

 

Who knows?  There's no precise classification of solicitor vs litigator, so difficult to say what category a judge falls into.  And don't forget McLaughlin was a law professor before being appointed - what category is she?

 

But yes, the large number of judicial appointments come from practicing litigators.

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lol some of you guys need to chill..posts like this

If I were you I'd google the last two dozen SCC justices and see where they went to school. Seems like the most direct answer to your very specific question.

 

 

 

and this

I can't believe someone can be this oblivious. Especially someone who so clearly has the intellectual firepower to ascend to our highest court.

 

 

add no substance to op's answer and leak arrogance and condescension. In other words, you're pricks.

 

I may not be as intelligent as you, or as strong as you, or as good looking as you for that matter, but I know when to treat peers with respect and that's surely something that any lawyer needs to get down before becoming successful in any right. You guys I quoted, as well as the rest of you with similar responses, I certainly hope you wouldn't act this way in real life. The forum casts a shadow which allows people to act righteous and outside their own accord, hopefully that is what's at play here.

 

Op, I can't help answer your question but I entered this thread because I was curious and I too did not know the answer.

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In other words, you're pricks.

 

I may not be as intelligent as you, or as strong as you, or as good looking as you for that matter, but I know when to treat peers with respect and that's surely something that any lawyer needs to get down before becoming successful in any right. You guys I quoted, as well as the rest of you with similar responses, I certainly hope you wouldn't act this way in real life.

The forum casts a shadow which allows people to act righteous

 

I'm nominating this for most unintentionally funny post of the day. Who'll second it?

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I'm nominating this for most unintentionally funny post of the day. Who'll second it?

 

 

Gotta love the classic "you're all being self-righteous and I'm better than you because of it" approach.  Brought the lulz out though, so kudos. 

Edited by MrIncognito

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I'm nominating this for most unintentionally funny post of the day. Who'll second it?

 

Me!  I will!

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Who is that?

Chief Justice of the SCC, although I have a feeling MP meant Maclachlin.

Edited by PoliSciGuy

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According to the litigators at my firm 'solicitors aren't real lawyers anyway - we don't know what they actually do.'

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The Globe interviewed dozens of alumni who all admit when asked some derivative of "Where did you go to college?" they answer, "Oh, near Boston."

 

This is 5000 times worse.  I've met Harvard grads who pull this schtick and it just reeks of false modesty.

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