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sqk19

TRU or GSU?

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Normally what you say here would be correct, I don't think it is quite as black and white in this case.Keep in mind that the OP's other principal option is an (as of now) unproven Canadian school, which will probably end up placing most of its graduates that do manage to secure employment in jobs that probably won't pay that much better (if it all) then what a typical lawyer in Georgia would make. Unlike most Canadians considering regional American schools, the OP actually has ties to the region, which is apparently very important to local firms.

 

In the end though, neither of these are good options.

 

I understand that. I also appreciate the OP has family ties to Georgia, and if he wants to live there, great. If the goal is to practice in Canada, it's the wrong choice, and if the goal is to practice in Georgia, then sure, go to a Georgia school.

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In these discussions the interesting thing is that the quality of education always becomes an irrelevant factor.

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In these discussions the interesting thing is that the quality of education always becomes an irrelevant factor.

 

The implied undertone to your statement is that there's a measurable difference between these schools in that respect.

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In these discussions the interesting thing is that the quality of education always becomes an irrelevant factor.

 

Well, for four reasons:

  1. It's a lot hard to find valid data to make comparisons in terms of "educational quality" - any claim to do so is usually just presupposition;
  2. At the end of the day, you're going to professional school to get a job in the profession; whether one school does a slightly better than than another at preparing you for the profession is less relevant than your ability to get a job after you leave.
  3. The 'quality' of your education probably has a lot more to do with your peer group - i.e. how hard you have to work and what ideas you're exposed to - than the faculty.
  4. You'd probably be safe to assume that employers have some understanding about school quality in their region, and hire accordingly. Employment stats might actually be the best proxy we have when it comes to determining quality.
Edited by kenoshakid
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Well, for four reasons:

  1. It's a lot hard to find valid data to make comparisons in terms of "educational quality" - any claim to do so is usually just presupposition;
  2. At the end of the day, you're going to professional school to get a job in the profession; whether one school does a slightly better than than another at preparing you for the profession is less relevant than your ability to get a job after you leave.
  3. The 'quality' of your education probably has a lot more to do with your peer group - i.e. how hard you have to work and what ideas you're exposed to - than the faculty.
  4. You'd probably be safe to assume that employers have some understanding about school quality in their region, and hire accordingly. Employment stats might actually be the best proxy we have when it comes to determining quality.

 

 

Peer group is key

 

The implied undertone to your statement is that there's a measurable difference between these schools in that respect.

 

There is, one is brand new and one is an established school in a major city. 

Edited by pineapple21

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Peer group is key

 

 

There is, one is brand new and one is an established school in a major city. 

Except that, the new school is a barrier to entry into the profession while the established one is not.

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I normally am pretty against the out-of-country route, but if you've got family in Atlanta, it's not outrageously expensive, and if you think you can get a job down there (through your brothers connections or whatever), I'd probably choose it over TRU. My only reason would be that I hate small towns though.  And Atlanta is much warmer.

 

Of course its relative to what one is used to but I would not describe Kamloops as a "small town".

Atlanta does have better peaches though, this is true.

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Also, check this out:

 

http://www.law.ubc.ca/graduate/LLMCL.html

 

Basically, another option for you if you enroll at GSU and then realize you miss Vancouver's weather is to graduate with your American JD and then apply to enroll in UBC's LLM program, which allows you to avoid the NCA process altogether. Thus, you're able to network in Vancouver and obtain another degree in the process. I think the price is around $25K.

 

Just to be clear here as you do not actually get to "avoid" anything by, for example, the UBC route.

Competency is tested internally by UBC, rather than externally by sitting NCAs at the relevant law society; extra time is still a factor.

 

What you could try to do is speak nicely with the UBC staff to satisfy yourself that you could take all exams as close to each other as possible, in that year, before committing yourself to either route.

 

Results may vary.

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Of course its relative to what one is used to but I would not describe Kamloops as a "small town".

Atlanta does have better peaches though, this is true.

 

In my mind there are metropolises (NYC, Shanghai, London, etc.) There are big cities (Atlanta, Toronto, Chicago, etc.).  There are cities (Calgary, Minneapolis, Montreal, etc.).  And then there are small towns.  Also, the peaches in the Okanagan Valley are unquestionably the best peaches in the world.

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In my mind there are metropolises (NYC, Shanghai, London, etc.) There are big cities (Atlanta, Toronto, Chicago, etc.).  There are cities (Calgary, Minneapolis, Montreal, etc.).  And then there are small towns.  Also, the peaches in the Okanagan Valley are unquestionably the best peaches in the world.

 

Yes, however, I was talking in a canadian context; by that standard Kamloops would still be a city, but each to her/his own.

 

I can defer to you on the peaches, although I would not consider Kamloops to be the 'Okanagan' proper, at least not for peach horticultural purposes.

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In my mind there are metropolises (NYC, Shanghai, London, etc.) There are big cities (Atlanta, Toronto, Chicago, etc.).  There are cities (Calgary, Minneapolis, Montreal, etc.).  And then there are small towns.  Also, the peaches in the Okanagan Valley are unquestionably the best peaches in the world.

 

 

Montreal is a big city, come on, the metro area has nearly 4 million people!!! Also it seems much more like an "international" city than most other Canadian or American cities I've been. But we're splitting hairs. Big cities and cities offer much more opportunities than small centers, like Kamloops. Downtown ATL basically puts all those opportunities at your fingertips. 

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Montreal is a big city, come on, the metro area has nearly 4 million people!!! Also it seems much more like an "international" city than most other Canadian or American cities I've been. But we're splitting hairs. Big cities and cities offer much more opportunities than small centers, like Kamloops. Downtown ATL basically puts all those opportunities at your fingertips. 

 

Fair enough.  I was on the fence about it.  It's definitely the biggest of the cities I mentioned.  I was just trying to think of another Canadian example

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It's okay in the summer, has a nice pool / community centre with clean showers, the costco ain't bad and you can fill up your water jugs for free at most of the gas stations.

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Montreal is a big city, come on, the metro area has nearly 4 million people!!! Also it seems much more like an "international" city than most other Canadian or American cities I've been. But we're splitting hairs. Big cities and cities offer much more opportunities than small centers, like Kamloops. Downtown ATL basically puts all those opportunities at your fingertips

 

Don't forget the plethora of gun, general crime and urban drug opportunities available there too (no, not referring to Kamloops here).

No thanks. Not my scene.

 

Edit: My point is that there are many, many non-law factors that should also be considered when choosing where to attend school/article/practise.

Skiing availability would be another.

Edited by HuskyHwy16

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Don't forget the plethora of gun, general crime and urban drug opportunities available there too (no, not referring to Kamloops here).

No thanks. Not my scene.

 

Edit: My point is that there are many, many non-law factors that should also be considered when choosing where to attend school/article/practise.

Skiing availability would be another.

 

For what it's worth, this table from Maclean's ranking Canada's most dangerous cities suggests that Kamloops (at number 16) may be considerably more dangerous than Vancouver (18), Montreal (22), or Toronto (52).

 

(I'm just going to take a moment to feel really proud of Toronto.)

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For what it's worth, this table from Maclean's ranking Canada's most dangerous cities suggests that Kamloops (at number 16) may be considerably more dangerous than Vancouver (18), Montreal (22), or Toronto (52).

 

(I'm just going to take a moment to feel really proud of Toronto.)

 

Its a per capita thing, but you could be right, as I have yet to be robbed in TO; Vancouver, yes.

 

Anyways, we were looking at studying in Kamloops compared to downtown Atlanta; much more crime in Atlanta compared to any remotely comparable city in Canada (even when corrected for per capita).

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Atlanta has a lower crime rate than Salt Lake City. It has a higher black rate though, which is probably what factored in to your assumption. Also, don't believe what you see on American news television. Go out and see the country (if you can). 

 

Besides, most of the crime takes place in areas OP has no reason to be. You wouldn't tell someone not to go to UChicago, even though parts of Chicago are a warzone. 

Edited by pineapple21

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Atlanta has a lower crime rate than Salt Lake City. It has a higher black rate though, which is probably what factored in to your assumption. Also, don't believe what you see on American news television. Go out and see the country (if you can). 

 

Besides, most of the crime takes place in areas OP has no reason to be. You wouldn't tell someone not to go to UChicago, even though parts of Chicago are a warzone. 

 

No. Look again. I said:

 

"Anyways, we were looking at studying in Kamloops compared to downtown Atlanta; much more crime in Atlanta compared to any remotely comparable city in Canada (even when corrected for per capita)".

 

Your racial presumptions are your own fella.

 

Don't worry, I don't believe anything I see in USA media.

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I know this thread is a couple weeks old, but this has to be said:

 

I was feeling deja vu when I saw this lousy post. I went and looked and you are the same person that was trying to sell someone on GTown in another thread, explaining that DC was a "booming legal market" and that there was an under-supply of lawyers (when in reality, DC is basically the most difficult legal market to crack, and the very source you cited explained the flaw in its methodology re DC).

 

OP, please take the advice from this poster with a grain of salt. Here is a real look under the hood: http://www.lstscorereports.com/?school=gsu

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