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greenchip32k

74.8% Undergrad Average - Where Can I Apply?

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Hi everyone!  :-P

 

I've just wrapped up my BCom degree at UBC and ended up with a 74.8% overall average. I'll be writing the LSAT in June.

 

I'm new to all of this and have done some preliminary research and I understand that some schools look at your best 2 years, your last 2 years, or just drop your worst credits. I took courses in the summer during the 1st and 2nd years of my degree. Can anyone give me some guidance as to what schools I might have a shot at? (I would love to go to UBC as I grew up here and all that, but I know that's a long shot) Also, do law schools take summer courses into consideration when calculating your GPA?

 

Thanks in advance for your help! 

 

Some more info:

 

Best 2 years: 1st year (75%) and 3rd year (76.4%) 

Last 2 years: 3rd year (76.4%) and 4th year (73.3%) - Note: I failed a course in my fourth year

Average with 4 courses/12 credits dropped (UBC): 76.64%

 

EC's: held executive positions in clubs during my first 2 years, was a mentor to freshman students in my 3rd year, was a Junior Achievement mentor in my 4th year, 

Work Experience: Interned at a corporate finance firm the summer of my 3rd year, currently working there now

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From what I've read looks like your going to need to score 170 or greater to get into any law school in Canada. I know the U of A looks at your last two years of study. Only one kid got in with a 3.2 gpa who scored 170-171 on the LSAT. http://www.law.ualberta.ca/prospectivestudents/admissionsllb/applicationrequirements/documents/Admitted_Applicant_Profile.pdf

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Thanks for the reply! I guess I'm in a real tough situation. If I were to get above a 170 would my chances still be very slim? Is law school just not gonna happen for me?

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Your best possible chance lies with schools that are only looking at best two.. but most of those still look at CGPA and other factors (some Ontario ones). I'm not going to say "it's tough and if you work hard enough, you'll get it", because there is not even a guarantee that after working your ass off for a 170 (which I don't know if I could do myself) that you'll get it in somewhere. I would consider applying to TRU along with other schools, as I think with a 170 you could get in there. Also, Windsor is certainly possible too. So LS is not completely out of the running, but don't expect a lot, unless you can score a 170+

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Thanks for the reply! I guess I'm in a real tough situation. If I were to get above a 170 would my chances still be very slim? Is law school just not gonna happen for me?

 

I had a similar GPA to yours and got into UBC fairly early (in January) after hitting the high 170s. It really all depends on how high an LSAT you can pull off. But by definition, most people don't hit the 99th percentile, so I wouldn't count on it.

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honestly i am not sure what my GPA was, but i think it was around yours and I got into UNB, Dalhousie, Windsor and Saskatchewan. My LSAT was 163.

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Just wanted to update this post for future reference. I ended up getting into the University of Manitoba with an LSAT score of 163.

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must hit 90th percentile to be considered for all ontario law schools, except lakehead and windsor where a mid 80th percentile might get you an offer. A 90th percentile is above 164 on the lsat. Don't have high hopes though, there is a reason that's 90th% percentile. It is because 90% of the test takers cannot get to that score. My diagnostic was around low 150s and it took 6 months of intense dedication where I studied 6-8 hrs a day, 5 days a week to finally get 165. Maybe you'll start much better than myself or improve a lot quicker but the only way to find out is to do a diagnostic test first. Most people do not jump more than 10-12 points than their diagnostic score. Good luck!

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From what I've read looks like your going to need to score 170 or greater to get into any law school in Canada. I know the U of A looks at your last two years of study. Only one kid got in with a 3.2 gpa who scored 170-171 on the LSAT. http://www.law.ualberta.ca/prospectivestudents/admissionsllb/applicationrequirements/documents/Admitted_Applicant_Profile.pdf

Haha no.

 

Manitoba and UNB have a generous drop system.

 

Plus you're good to go with a 160 albiet with a late acceptance

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I applied to a lot of schools knowing pretty much all of them were long shots - Osgoode, Toronto, Queen's, Western, and UBC.

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Just wanted to update this post for future reference. I ended up getting into the University of Manitoba with an LSAT score of 163.

 

Thank you very much for taking time out to update! You gave me so much hope just now :rolling: , and congratulations on your admission!

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