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McGill vs U de M

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I meant if you study civil law at U de M or McGill, you don't actually have to go to bar school, you can just do the bar exam?  I thought bar school was mandatory before you could take the exam.

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I meant if you study civil law at U de M or McGill, you don't actually have to go to bar school, you can just do the bar exam?  I thought bar school was mandatory before you could take the exam.

 

No. Everyone has to do Bar school, but there are two options: the four month and the eight month options. The four month option is a practical lawyering skills and ethics course, followed by the bar exam. The eight month option starts off with prep courses which review what one has learned in law school, then it streams into the regular four month bar school I have just described. 

 

The stats I posted before are for those with and without the extra four months of bar prep, which are entirely optional.

Edited by lecavaleur

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Ah, that makes sense, thanks.  So you're saying that if you're a U de M student you don't really need the extra 4 months prep course because you've learned it already, and you just need to review your notes, whereas if you're a McGill student, you should take the course because it involves a lot of material you haven't seen before.

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Not necessarily. A friend of mine (UdM) took the placement and was recommended he do the 8 month program. Many of my McGill colleagues just passed the BAR after doing the 4-month program. The placement test will help you determine which stream you should do. McGill students tend to pass when following the recommended course - the failure rate increases when people ignore the 8 month recommendation instead.

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The placement test judges your relevant knowledge for the bar exam?  Why would one person come out of school needing the full 8 months and another needing only 4 months?

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No idea. I'm at Sherbrooke and a lot of my colleagues are taking the 8 month program "just to be safe", and for a while I was indecisive about the whole thing, hesitating between the two options. But then I looked at the stats and realized that the passing rate for Sherbrooke graduates is significantly higher in the 4 month pool than in the 8 month pool. In the 4 month category, we're number 1, but in the 8 month category we're number 4. 

 

So I am now leaning towards the 4 months. I'll take the placement test and see, but I really would prefer to get it over with in 4 months.

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That's easy, Haggis. Some people have different knowledge levels upon graduation. Other people are awful at tests. I know that if I were going to do the BARREAU (I'm not) I would take the 8 month program, just because I am awful at multiple choice style tests.

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Just wanted to say I'm ad UdeM now and really enjoying it. The teachers are passionate and excellent, the students are all nice and friendly, and the subject matter is intrinsically interesting and useful. Everything we learn is illustrated by tons of jurisprudence so we can either see where certain rules and ideas come frommor how they are applied, which is great. Looking forward to the rest of the semester and to volunteering for pro bono orgs.

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On 9/14/2013 at 7:52 AM, johnnyhaggis said:

Just wanted to say I'm ad UdeM now and really enjoying it. The teachers are passionate and excellent, the students are all nice and friendly, and the subject matter is intrinsically interesting and useful. Everything we learn is illustrated by tons of jurisprudence so we can either see where certain rules and ideas come frommor how they are applied, which is great. Looking forward to the rest of the semester and to volunteering for pro bono orgs.

I realize that this thread is 5 years old, but I am living the same dilemma right now. 

The choice between UdeM and McGill. And I am quite honestly not sure which path to take. 

Considering that I am fully bilingual and that UdeM now offers a JD...

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Posted (edited)

I honestly think Mcgill is better.

I just took from previous post in Page 1 . From livinglengend.

"McGill beats UdeM as far as reputation and outside Quebec opportunities goes."

 

I think UdeM is more like civil law school,  and you take 3 year of civil law school and one year of JD afterward. It's probably place huge emphasis of civil law , and it is civil law focused school.  If you want to stay in Quebec, both are great schools.

But if you want to migrate from one province to another, If you want more opportunity or option open , you shall try Mcgill or at least it never hurt to try.  Since you are already bilingual, you don't have to  study of all of  laws and reading in French translation and get complete French JD. Maybe you can find a school with slightly more options open.

 

Just my 2 cents

Edited by akulamasusu

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Seems like McGill is changing it's common law degree designation to JD now too so there's not even a formality difference between the degrees offered ;)

ask yourself this: what benefits does UdM offer you that McGill doesn't? I'm trying not to be biased but prima facie McGill is the better choice. That can be rebutted, and I think especially in circumstances unique to the applicant.

So.. Why do you like UdM? And I can try and answer as to McGill in that context for you.

On 4/8/2019 at 6:50 PM, petalspanda said:

I realize that this thread is 5 years old, but I am living the same dilemma right now. 

The choice between UdeM and McGill. And I am quite honestly not sure which path to take. 

Considering that I am fully bilingual and that UdeM now offers a JD...

 

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On 4/11/2019 at 4:04 PM, pzabbythesecond said:

Seems like McGill is changing it's common law degree designation to JD now too so there's not even a formality difference between the degrees offered ;)

ask yourself this: what benefits does UdM offer you that McGill doesn't? I'm trying not to be biased but prima facie McGill is the better choice. That can be rebutted, and I think especially in circumstances unique to the applicant.

So.. Why do you like UdM? And I can try and answer as to McGill in that context for you.

 

Firstly, thank you guys for taking the time to respond. 

 

I am torn between the two schools because language is not an issue at all, both are now offering JDs, and both have academic and social distinctions for different reasons. 

I will be moving to the US not long after my degree (husband is American) and have read about the NY Bar, Vermont Bar, and New Hampshire Bar. 

Since UdeM now offers a JD, the US bars will not be an issue.   

I have a degree in literature, so heavy readings are not an issue. 

I had a very long conversation with a well-placed member of McGill's faculty, and she made this decision even harder by mitigating many of my concerns, such as success at the bar, and time required to finish the degree. 

I am wondering now about the amount of work, as in the amount of writing that both schools require. How are the exams? 

At this point, I am so torn that I'm trying to decide based on the steep walk up that hill and parking... 

 

 

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1 hour ago, pzabbythesecond said:

If you're even considering going to NY, you go to McGill and it shouldn't be a question.

 

Oddly enough, I do know one friend who ended up in NY following the UdM degrees. Mind you, he did the JD and used that as an opportunity to get into the UN under a student intern program, despite working full-time as a lawye.r

I agree though - no questions asked if America is being considered. Go to McGill. It's also 3.5 years instead of 4 years (UdM + JD year).

Edited by artsydork
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OP I'm not even saying that McGill is necessarily the better school (though, I am saying that too). But just by virtue of having an alumni network in NY, and other American cities, it gives you a better chance of moving over into a good legal job (say if you don't get NY big law). 

That's not even taking into account plain name recognition, which for obvious reasons McGill is the better choice.

As for bar passage rates, McGill has the best, if not the top 2, in Quebec pretty much every year. It's a myth that mcgillians don't do well. Bar school is a more painful experience for us because the barreau takes an extremely reductive approach to the law, which is basically the anti-thesis of McGill law. But our students catch on very quick and do well regardless.

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On 4/14/2019 at 7:14 PM, pzabbythesecond said:

If you're even considering going to NY, you go to McGill and it shouldn't be a question.

 

This.

Having graduated from UdeM and having done their JD, and also having had a lot of friends graduate from McGill, there's no question that McGill is the better path if you plan on working outside of Quebec after law school (and frankly probably still the better choice if you plan on staying within the province too, though much more marginally and parhaps subjectively).

Not to say that UdeM can't get you where you want to get, it's just that I can't see any objective advantage of taking that route, especially in your situation @petalspanda

Cheers,

Edited by he4dhuntr

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