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Uriel

POSTS ARE FOREVER

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I'll add a couple other thoughts here.

 

If User1 asks a question, and User2 takes the time to post a thorough and well-reasoned response, it's quite rude to User2 if we delete the thread just because User1 has decided he has the information he needs and would like the post to go away now. There is no property in a forum thread.

 

If you go to the main forum index page and scroll to the bottom, you'll see how many people are currently reading the site. You'll also see how many of those are logged-in users. As I write this, 88% of people reading the site are entirely passive users. That's a lot of people benefiting from what's written here, without being the ones who ask the questions. If we delete a thread, anyone who might have come across the information in the future and found it useful would lose out. That's unfortunate.

 

As for being able to delete one's own posts - many users find a convenient workaround by simply editing the post down to nothing. You're welcome to do that within the editing time window. When I see someone's done that in a thread, I'll usually just kill the post.

Edited by whereverjustice
clearer wording
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Agree with Uriel. The number of requests has gotten ridiculous recently. The edit window, I believe, was extended when the new system was started, whenever that was. I'm fairly sure that it is longer than 10 or 15 minutes but Morgan can weigh in on that. I think an hour should be sufficient time to edit a post. Any editing after that becomes a problem with the flow of a discussion and it lends itself to someone being a jerk and then deleting what was said. I think it would be a mistake to allow for any editing beyond the ability to do so within a reasonable amount of time.

 

The key is for people to be mindful of what they're posting, and if they choose not to be, then the consequences are their problem. Stating again, because so many seem to disbelieve it, you are not as anonymous as you may think when you start posting information here. Behave yourself accordingly.

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So, let me get this straight: the people who are arguing for a longer edit period are, essentially, saying that they'd like to shoot from the hip more often and then have a chance to reel it in later on? W.T.F.?

 

Seriously, what the hell are you going to say that's so awful that you need to do some serious editing 12 hours later? Maybe don't say it in the first place?

 

What the hell is wrong with just quoting your own post and admitting that you've changed your position to "the following: ... ".

 

THe great thing about intellectual debate is that nothing is every crystallized BECAUSE YOU CAN ALWAYS CHANGE YOUR MIND!!! And when you do change your mind you make another post explaining your new position. That's how people did it in the old days with, you know, like printed articles and books and stuff. I don't see why the hell people should be given the opportunity to say whatever the hell they want with the knowledge that after they've "tried their argument out" they can go back and erase their original position - essentially pretending like they never held that view.

 

In my opinion one of the reasons this forum works so well and why we don't have as many flame wars as lots of forums is because our posts are essentially permanent. People have to actually put some thought into their posts.

 

I don't think intellectual debate is strengthened by the ability of its participants to change their minds behind closed doors. If you want to change your mind, at least do it out in the open.

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The one situation I am sympathetic to is when people post information about themselves without realizing how small the legal community really is and want to take down the revealing information.

 

I have been on sites with unlimited editing time and I do not believe it is an improvement. I am surprised people are really all that concerned about this based on the idea that they want to "try arguments out". A couple years ago there was a thread about a Harvard law student that sent an email that had racist overtones, that was attached to her name and made international news. The point is that being able to remove your opinion is not the norm, here it is mostly anonymous but you should be guarding your opinion.

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Seriously, what the hell are you going to say that's so awful that you need to do some serious editing 12 hours later? Maybe don't say it in the first place?

 

What the hell is wrong with just quoting your own post and admitting that you've changed your position to "the following: ... ".

 

THe great thing about intellectual debate is that nothing is every crystallized BECAUSE YOU CAN ALWAYS CHANGE YOUR MIND!!! And when you do change your mind you make another post explaining your new position. That's how people did it in the old days with, you know, like printed articles and books and stuff. I don't see why the hell people should be given the opportunity to say whatever the hell they want with the knowledge that after they've "tried their argument out" they can go back and erase their original position - essentially pretending like they never held that view.

 

I agree with this post almost entirely because of the gratuitous use of the word "hell". Minor cuss words are too frequently overlooked in favour of their brasher, louder cousins. I applaud you, sir. This is how gentlemen curse.

 

Re: implementing a sobering up grace period: speaking for myself, about half of my wit and all of my charm would vanish from the board and you would be left with the dull meandering thoughts of a much less entertaining persona it would probably be a good idea, but not a very fun one.

 

(Edit: seriously, though, I thought the grace period was already one hour... am I wrong?)

(Edit #2: looks like it's possible after 20 minutes, at least...)

(Edit #3: half an hour!)

(Edit #4: forty minutes and I am going to bed. I'm calling it at an hour.)

Edited by Hegdis
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Edit time is one hour. Do not post personal information.

 

This is your pissy Monday morning reminder...

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Time for a reminder.

Stop posting your actual names, phone numbers, addresses, unique undergraduate experiences that immediately identify you, the prizes you have won, the year you placed in whatever competition, and your close personal relationship with Named Partner X. Unless you want these things associated to your account forever. 

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