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allogoodbye

McGill Admission Statistics

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Hi everyone,

 

After speaking with someone on the admissions committee, this is what I've found out. (The person did not tell me if this was confidential or not - so please let me know if it is and I will take it down).

 

- There are about 11-13 people on the committee, with 1-2 graduating students included

- There are first readers, second readers, and sometimes third readers. The graduating students will never be the first readers. The associate dean will read all of them.

- To cope with the large mass of applications, McGill uses a GPA index to decide which applications circulate first.

- Above a certain GPA, applications only need 1-2 readers. Below a certain GPA, applications require 2-3 readers.

- Each reader takes a stack of 10-30 files per week and makes comments/suggested decision, based on pre-decided characteristics.

 

The average number of offers made per year over the past five years is 254.

 

University + Mature (147 students):

- academic average 84%

- average LSAT 162

- 46 of the entering students have studied at grad level

 

CEGEP (32 students):

- Average Cot R = 33.455

Most CEGEPS only had 1-2 accepted last year, though Brébeuf had 4, Dawson had 5, and Marianopolis had 7.

 

Quebec residents make up 62% of the class.

27% French first language

14% first language neither English nor French

 

Average age:

University - 24

CEGEP - 19

Mature - 33

 

Applicant pool:

- average is 79% GPA

- LSAT 157

- 60% women; 40% men

 

LSAT:

Out of 252 offers, 117 took the LSAT

 

CEGEP:

Average number admitted is 29 (average of 17% of the class)

 

Applicant pool class/pool ratio:

University/Mature: 18% (79/431)

CEGEP: 10% (32/323)

Canada outside QC/Mature: 8% (53/650)

International University/Mature: 20% (15/75))

Total: 12% (179/1479)

 

 

Currently they have two working groups to reassess how they do admissions. One is more focused on how they assess personal statements, the other one is on how they conduct CEGEP interviews. They are reviewing things like how heavily to weight the LSAT, and what other factors contribute to good lawyers (not just good 1Ls).

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Thanks for all this really helpful info!! Do you know if they hand out rejections one-by-one as they read each application or if they have sent out a large amount to applicants below a certain threshold? And did this person tell you anything about how they look at a huge jump from a sub-par lsat score to a competitive score? All your input is extremely appreciated!!!

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This is great information. Thank you for posting this. Any indication of how widely distributed their GPA spread is?

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@lsat smellsats

 

Can't answer your first question, but I called McGill admissions not long ago to inquire about your second question. They told me that they average multiple LSAT scores, however, they will consider big increases favourably. Nevertheless, more emphasis is placed on the average.

Edited by dan1010

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Thanks allogoodbye! It's great to have more info on what is happenning while we (anxiously) wait! I'm impresssed by the number of people doing the assessments and I love the idea that they have students involed in the process.

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Is it bad to say I wish the process wasn't quite so holistic? I mean... it is of course great, especially the fact they have student representatives. My ECs and LofR are pretty good, but I can't help thinking that if it was more a numbers game, I would have a better chance! :|

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I think that my only (and slim) chance to get in is through my personnal statement and ECs... So I loooove the holistic aspect of their process. If it was not for it I wouldn't have applied at all.

 

Unfortunately for me and luckily for you I'm pretty sure grades count A LOT ! I went to the information session in fall 2011 and they insisted a lot on "excellence". Basically they said they want the whole package but that they balance the incredible grades and incredible ECs they are looking for... and that one can help compensate a little for the other. They also insisted that the programme is hard and they don't want to admitt people that they don't think can handle it academically.

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That is good info to know for sure! I think it's great that they look for all around excellence, as well as variety of skills and experience. Though my GPA is okay (82-83%) my LSAT score is better, so hopefully that will count for something =)

 

Good luck to all, here is hoping we find out soon one way or another!

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Wow, this is very useful information. Thanks for posting.

 

The statistic that surprised me the most is "Quebec residents make up 62% of the class." On their website, it clearly states that geographic area plays no role in admissions decision. Naturally one would expect the number coming from the province of the school to be higher than that from other provinces, but I think McGill is a special case as an English (well, predominantly at least) institution in Quebec, and because it attracts a lot of interest from other provinces and even other countries. Logically, because of reputation, I would expect a student from BC, for example, to be much more inclined to apply to McGill than a school like, say, UNB. Maybe I am way off base, but I would have expected the number of Quebec students to be a bit lower.

 

Any thoughts? Could that number though be just of students applying with a Quebec mailing address? For example, students from Ontario or elsewhere that did their undergrad at McGill? Or does it actually mean legal residents of Quebec who will be paying the lower tuition fee?

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Not to mention that many people from other provinces are probably less inclined to apply to McGill because of the French requirement and the extra semester required to complete the program.

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a GPA os 3.75 is what percent? I find it odd that mcgill says the average is 83%-yet mcgill doesnt use percent, they use GPA...and I never know how to convert....

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Thank you so much for your research, it's really nice to post this for us to read!

I don't know if it makes me feel more certain about my admission or not though ...ah well, hopefully my EC will help !

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lsats smellsats - sorry no new information on how rejections are dealt with

Roy Batty - sorry no new info on that either

 

gregyyj - to put the 62% into perspective, consider the applicant pool: last year, 753 residents of Quebec applied, versus 650 from other provinces.

 

Also interesting to note: most universities inside and outside of Canada have 0-3 acceptances, except the following (no information is provided on the relative applicant pools by school however)

Carleton - 8, Concordia - 17, Ottawa U - 9, McGill - 41, UQAM - 6

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allogoodbye: OK, when you look at the application distributions then it makes much more sense. I don't know why initially 62% surprised me, but if the majority of applications come from Quebec then it's logical. I suppose I just thought that, being an anglo school (though not the law program, the university itself is certainly perceived as anglophone throughout the province), the proportion of Quebec applications would be less.

 

Oh well, interesting statistics anyways. Thanks again for posting.

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Also interesting to note: most universities inside and outside of Canada have 0-3 acceptances, except the following (no information is provided on the relative applicant pools by school however)

Carleton - 8, Concordia - 17, Ottawa U - 9, McGill - 41, UQAM - 6

 

Is this from last year ?

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