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10 reasons TO go to my law school

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I found the thread "10 reasons not to go to my school" very interesting and informative from my perspective as a 0L. However, I'm interested in the other side of the coin as well. Any current law students care to comment on the areas in which their respective schools are strong?

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I'll do a U of Sask one for you. It will be a countdown towards the "top" reason, which has some subjectivity to it of course.

 

10)People in Saskatchewan are really friendly, more so than anywhere else I've ever been.

 

9)There's a Tim Horton's close to the law building, and a starbucks in a hospital that is very close.

 

8)The Place Riel foodcourt, though still lame, got a lot better over the summer, and it isn't complete yet!

 

7)The girls you see around campus are very beautiful, according to Maxim's "study" we have the second hottest women out of all Canadian Universities (maybe this should be ranked higher than 7th?)

 

6)It is a beautiful city in the summer, with nice places to golf/have barbeques/bike/hike/ go to river beaches etc.

 

5)It's not hard to find a place to live somewhere near campus, either downtown, University Heights, Broadway, or Sutherland. I think the bus frequencies to school are pretty good from all of these spots, and when it's not freezing cold out its possible to walk to school from some of the locations I named.

 

4)We have some pretty good profs. I'm finding that in 2nd year many of my profs are top notch teachers and academics, and this makes class a lot more interesting and enjoyable. For example, I have Sanjeev Anand for Crim Pro, a pretty big deal in this area.

 

3)We have a nice law building with a foosball table.

 

2)We have Calgary OCI's, sometimes Edmonton firms come too, and going here provides lots of opportunities to get jobs in Saskatchewan.

 

1)Our legal clinic, CLASSIC (Community Legal Assistance Services for Saskatoon Inner City), is my favourite part of law school so far. It gives students all kinds of opportunities to volunteer, meet lawyers, and make a difference in the community. You can do legal research for Saskatoon lawyers, be a student advocate and take on files in areas like criminal law, landlord-tenant issues, and small claims civil stuff (which can involve going to provincial court and landlord-tenant tribunals), or give power point presentations on various topics to people who would find it useful (I think a recent one was what the new health care privacy legislation means, and the audience was hospital staff, just for example. These usually involve things like explaining how family law works or what the residential tenancies act means to lower income people).

Edited by Fletcher Reed
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I'll do a U of Sask one for you. It will be a countdown towards the "top" reason, which has some subjectivity to it of course.

 

9)There's a Tim Horton's close to the law building, and a starbucks in a hospital that is very close.

 

There is always a loooooooong lineup at this Tims though.

 

7)The girls you see around campus are very beautiful, according to Maxim's "study" we have the second hottest women out of all Canadian Universities (maybe this should be ranked higher than 7th?)

 

Not trying to insult anyone but I don't think there were a surplus of beautiful girls at the U of S. I always thought there were about as many as one would statistically expect.

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I'll have a go at doing UVic's (I went to UBC for my undergrad, so I think some of my points will include a comparison-bias in that direction ... I'll try to note it when it comes up).

 

These aren't in any particular order, by the way, just as they come to my mind.

 

1. Weather. This gets cited by a lot of the out-of-province students that go to UVic as a major factor. We have even-tempered summers (if you stay through the summer) - not too hot, not too cool - and we don't have anything even approaching what most people would call "winter." Every couple years we get snow for three days. If you like having the ability to go out and do stuff outside year round (and there are lots of outdoorsy activities on Vancouver Island), UVic's awesome. Vancouver/UBC has this positive too but it rains a little bit more in Vancouver, statistically.

 

Example of this point: it rained for a bit this morning, but right now it's gloriously sunny, the autumn leaves are out all over campus and jumping around in the breeze, and it's warm enough that I had to roll the window down in my car while driving to campus. I know students from the Prairies who never put on their winter coat while they're here and it's totally fine.

 

2. Small campus, small cohort. UVic's campus is nice and compact (versus my experience at UBC, which sprawls on forever, although if you don't have to go beyond the law school that's not such a huge problem). We also have a small cohort compared to many of the law schools: 300 students total, 100 in each incoming class. Chances that you'll know a fair portion of your graduating class are quite high. Allows for some smaller seminar classes even in first year, too.

 

3. Reputation for collegiality is well-earned. UVic Law has a very friendly demeanour and attempts to focus students from the start on being peers, not competitors. In fact outwardly competitive behaviour is strongly downplayed and de-emphasized. (This could be a negative for some people, I must admit).

 

4. This could be a negative point for some, but the school has a strong social justice/leftist bent, both among its profs (feminist scholars, environmental law focus, strong Aboriginal law course offerings) and its students. Student body as a whole seems focused on inclusiveness, equality, etc. I think we have a fairly diverse student body, too.

 

5. Co-op - it's the only program in the country. I'm not in co-op, but for those who'd like to try a range of legal jobs before graduating or who worry about having enough experience to get articles, co-op is super helpful.

 

6. Wide range of clinical courses - business law clinic, environmental law clinic, and the Law Centre (an off-campus clinical term where students provide the whole gamut of legal services to under-funded clients). There's also a good mix of black letter and theoretical courses in upper years, although being such a small school, the range is obviously not as wide as the larger schools can offer.

 

7. A good set of profs - generally very engaged with the material and willing to engage closely with the students.

 

8. We've got a ping-pong table in our lounge ...

 

9. The building as a whole is so-so, but the library was renovated last year and is really nice. One of the nicer academic libraries I've been in, honestly.

 

10. It's pretty cheap, as far as tuition goes ($8500).

 

Other UVicers, feel free to chime in.

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Mike4, more importantly, what's the hipster:non-hipster ratio compared to, say, Toronto.

This is very important to me.

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Other UVicers, feel free to chime in.

 

11. I second all of hefeweizen's points.

 

12. The upper years. They'll buy you beers, cook you potluck dinners, give you CANs, put on exam writing workshops, invite you to their Halloween parties, among many, many other things.

 

13. The faculty and administration seem keenly aware of the difficulties of life as a 1L, and take steps to make sure you can cope.

 

14. It's basically high school, but without the jerks.

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Mike4, more importantly, what's the hipster:non-hipster ratio compared to, say, Toronto.

This is very important to me.

 

you have the rest of your working life to live in that soulless hellhole of despair

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Mike4, more importantly, what's the hipster:non-hipster ratio compared to, say, Toronto.

This is very important to me.

 

This would be one factor on which Toronto wins out. That is if you don't like hipsters.

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This would be one factor on which Toronto wins out. That is if you don't like hipsters.

 

 

...there are no real hipsters in McGill law. Or in the McGill ghetto, where McGill students tend to flock to in drones.

 

Don't worry- hipsters hate you more than you hate them.

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This would be one factor on which Toronto wins out. That is if you don't like hipsters.

 

If hipsters in Montreal are everywhere (mainstream), would that make me a hipster for hating them?

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15.UVIC as the lowest number of hipsters at zero

16. First Year prof are really comittted to teaching

17. Oprotutiuy for students to play a role in shaping to Law School furter

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12. The upper years. They'll buy you beers, cook you potluck dinners, give you CANs, put on exam writing workshops, invite you to their Halloween parties, among many, many other things.

 

 

The downside next year we have to buy beer make CANs, Put on Workshops and cook dinners :P

 

18. Serdog attends UVIC

19. Veecee attends UVIC

Edited by serdog
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what's the hipster:non-hipster ratio compared to, say, Toronto.

This is very important to me.

 

I really appreciate that this question is being asked.

 

Maybe we could create a 1-10 hipster density scale and possibly a population map?

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15.UVIC as the lowest number of hipsters at zero

16. First Year prof are really comittted to teaching

17. Oprotutiuy for students to play a role in shaping to Law School furter

 

You play a dangerous game, my friend. Hipsters entire ideology relies upon them getting to places/things before other hipsters find out about them. You've just outed UVic as "underground." Now we can only pray the Hipsters haven't taken note.

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Only Uvic and U of S? (I'm not counting the McGill one) other schools need to buck up - I guess that means me as well.

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I'd be very interested to see some more schools, especially Toronto, Ottawa, Osgoode or Queens have to say, as those are the ones I applied at.

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U of M

 

1. Judge Shadowing

2. Professors, by and large, are awesome

3. Business Law Group - $10 gets you six pizza lunches, guest speakers, virtual stock exchange contest

4. New couches in the common room and student lounge

5. Recent Court of Appeal hearing held in the Moot Courtroom for 1Ls

 

http://law.robsonhall.ca/cover-story/724-the-manitoba-court-of-appeal-transforms-robson-halls-mootcourtroom-into-a-real-court-of-appeal

 

6. Curling: I don't play, but those who do seem to have a great time

7. 1L Oral Advocacy and 2L Advocacy Moot - Both are held at the Law Courts Building and are taped for post-argument assessment

8. Winnipeg's new airport has more neon lights than trance night at your favourite night club

9. E.K. Williams Law Library has some really comfortable couches overlooking the brown…errr, the Red River

10. The upper year students are incredibly helpful and will happily provide you with tips, outlines, and so on

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UBC:

 

1) Way more access to the Vancouver law community than at UVic. Especially in 1L they have tonnes of events, many of which are open bar. There are a few upper years who still attend these things just for the booze.

 

2) Great course selection. There's enough classes in most areas that you can really specialize in what interests you. I'm a business law guy, and I've been able to take not only tonnes of business law classes, but tonnes in the specific area that I'm interested in.

 

3) In Vancouver. For many Vancouver natives, this is the only reason you really need.

 

4) New building. I say this as a positive, though some parts of the new building aren't really all that great. Like ZERO cell service in the building, the amazing new library is always filled with undergrads, the mens bathrooms are....weird. However by-and-large, it's a positive.

 

5) Great EC programs. LSLAP is great, Pro Bono has tonnes of very interesting placements. There's plenty of sports teams, many of which are quite active.

 

6) No snow. It snows 1 day a year in Vancouver, and when it does the entire city shuts down. Good fun.

 

7) Whistler-Blackcomb. Word class ski mountain driving distance from home? Hells ya! Plus UBC students get discounts on seasons passes: only $550. There will be plenty of people in your class whose parents own places up there, so be sure to make friends with them :P

 

8) Cheap-ish tuition: Only $11K per year, which is less than many schools (U of A and U of T come to mind...)

 

9) Lots of great profs. Sure there are a few shitty ones, but by and large the profs have been great. Especially true in upper years, where you can pick and choose.

 

10) Vancouver is awesome. Beach parties in the summer, skiing in the winter. No snow, good transit, great scenery. Ya I already mentioned this, but it is worth re-mentioning. Don't worry about the rain, you'll get used to it.

 

 

 

 

Unfortunately, we do have lots of hipsters. Also, the real reason there's no assholes at UVic? They're all at UBC. There will be a gunner or two in all your classes, and a fair number of people who don't share CANs (though the LSS has a website with lots of great ones on it, and many people do share). There are also a good number of really pretentious people.

 

edit: I'm really glad I went here. No regrets

Edited by Denning Jr
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UBC:

 

8) Cheap-ish tuition: Only $11K per year, which is less than many schools (U of A and U of T come to mind...)

 

 

U of A's first year tuition is 11.4 K. Not much of a difference. At 11k I think UBC's tuition would be a fair bit cheaper every school in Ontario (except for maybe Windsor; I have no idea what they charge for tuition).

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