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3 minutes ago, Horace said:

Since you don't mind nitpicky, can you describe the pattern more specifically please? If we're talking herringbone, houndstooth, or a small check in the same colour, you're probably fine.

It's one of those three.

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Hi. Honestly not sure if I'm allowed to ask a question in these forums. Not at all a lawyer, not even remotely close - just a 1st (2nd?) year undergrad that's used to wearing jeans and whatnot. 

I luckily got a job with a ministry in the Ontario Government this summer and when I met with my boss last week she recommend I wear a button up and a tie on most days except Fridays. I currently only own one tie (from prom...).

Do any of you know where I might be able to pick up ties that aren't uber expensive? Everywhere I go they seem to be $75 and that's just not in my price range :(  I live with my mom/aunt and they've got just as little of an idea as I do tbh, so I was hoping one of you might be able to help. They said if worst comes to worst they'll just foot the bill for some of the nicer ones but I'd rather pay through my own savings (they already have to pay for other things like shirts, pants, go bus, etc). 

If anyone does help, thank you!! 

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Posted (edited)

If you’re in Toronto, check out Uniqlo.

Edit: I totally misread ties as shirts. And Uniqlo apparently does just one tie (maybe different styles in store, although only one online as far as I can see — but just $15!) so maybe not a good recommendation. Hm. You could always try second-hand stores? Might be kinda fun. 

Edited by onepost

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58 minutes ago, Mal said:

100% this for building a quick foundation. I own a few of their ties--no frills, but they hold up fine, aren't polyester, and the price can't be beat.

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22 hours ago, onepost said:

If you’re in Toronto, check out Uniqlo.

Edit: I totally misread ties as shirts. And Uniqlo apparently does just one tie (maybe different styles in store, although only one online as far as I can see — but just $15!) so maybe not a good recommendation. Hm. You could always try second-hand stores? Might be kinda fun. 

 

21 hours ago, Mal said:

 

20 hours ago, Horace said:

100% this for building a quick foundation. I own a few of their ties--no frills, but they hold up fine, aren't polyester, and the price can't be beat.

Thank you all for the help, it's much appreciated. 'Thetiebar' works perfectly and I'll be ordering some ties from there tonight! Didn't know it existed until now. Thanks again! 

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I've grown rather finicky with respect to having my suits tailored to fit just right.

Experienced and fashion-forward barristers, what degree of tailoring is recommended for waistcoats and court trousers? For example, is "no break" kosher for court trousers or is it considered improper? Should waistcoats be fitted in a similar manner as a well-tailored suit jacket or does experience recommend a particular fit (e.g. "get it a little larger for the sake of comfort on those long days in court")?

I'm being fitted for the Call to the Bar in June and will be returning as an associate in a litigation firm. I'm trying to balance not looking slovenly in ill-fitting attire with also not breaking any unwritten rules of decorum.

On a related note, I've seen barristers leave the bottom button of their waistcoat undone as one would when wearing a three-piece suit, but have also heard this is improper. Thoughts?

Apologies if this has been canvassed elsewhere. I did a very cursory search and nothing came up immediately.

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^ I understood none of it and I have been in the profession for a very long time.

I try to wear clean robes when I have to wear robes - clean ones are nice.

Don't get me wrong - I have nothing but the greatest respect for people who take looking good seriously.

 

 

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My experience dictates getting the armpit seams opened up in your vest. Like you see with mountain climbing jackets that have those little vents you can zip open. No one will see it with your robes overtop but on long hot days it makes all the difference. 

Get it fitted but not tight. You don’t need it to be roomy, just comfortable. 

Get at least two shirts and wash those suckers and bleach and iron them regularly. They show stains fast - especially around the collar and under the arms, where your vest presses them against your skin. 

I have no opinion on break/no break. If you want to look dandy get morning pants instead of using black trousers. That’s classic. 

Button done up or undone has more to do with your personal six pack / keg size than decorum. If you can button it, do. 

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45 minutes ago, Hegdis said:

 

Get at least two shirts and wash those suckers and bleach and iron them regularly. They show stains fast - especially around the collar and under the arms, where your vest presses them against your skin. 

 

Mix hydrogen peroxide, baking soda, and dish soap (as a binder) and use it as a stain treatment and it should get the yellow stains out. 

Oxyclean should do it as well.

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On 5/9/2018 at 9:01 AM, Marquis said:

I've grown rather finicky with respect to having my suits tailored to fit just right.

Experienced and fashion-forward barristers, what degree of tailoring is recommended for waistcoats and court trousers? For example, is "no break" kosher for court trousers or is it considered improper? Should waistcoats be fitted in a similar manner as a well-tailored suit jacket or does experience recommend a particular fit (e.g. "get it a little larger for the sake of comfort on those long days in court")?

I'm being fitted for the Call to the Bar in June and will be returning as an associate in a litigation firm. I'm trying to balance not looking slovenly in ill-fitting attire with also not breaking any unwritten rules of decorum.

On a related note, I've seen barristers leave the bottom button of their waistcoat undone as one would when wearing a three-piece suit, but have also heard this is improper. Thoughts?

Apologies if this has been canvassed elsewhere. I did a very cursory search and nothing came up immediately.

As I've written elsewhere in this thread, I tend toward almost no break in my trousers. However, I spend a lot of my time in court sitting, often with my legs crossed. For that reason, I keep my formal trousers tailed with the standard break (so as to not show any skin).

I have my waistcoat tailored quite close. Quite frankly the waistcoat is so poorly made that it is still too loose for my tastes. I had it altered so the underarms are open.

Buttoning the bottom button is tricky--I would say it ultimately comes down to personal choice. To the extent court attire still tracks the Royals/UK custom, our friends across the pond are no help. The recent trend in morning attire has been toward double breasted waistcoats, so that doesn't help. You still see single breasted waistcoats, of course (David Beckham wears them frequently), and by my eyes, I say it's about a 60/40 split in favour of keeping the bottom button unbuttoned. Maybe check out the upcoming Royal Wedding. I certainly don't think keeping the button unbuttoned is "improper"--especially as seeing how the actual future king has, from time to time, worn his waistcoat in that manner at court.

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What's everyone's opinions on how stylish to dress for a) in-firm interviews and b) summering? 

By stylish, I mean something like cropped trouser with loafers? Very 2018 style that looks amazing with no socks as well. 

Too risky for interview and/or summering? 

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Dress conservatively for interviews, for summers it depends on the workplace. 

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21 minutes ago, Mal said:

Dress conservatively for interviews, for summers it depends on the workplace. 

Dress conservatively for both interviews and summering.  You want to be known for the quality of your work, not your fashion choices.  

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56 minutes ago, SergeiBerezin said:

What's everyone's opinions on how stylish to dress for a) in-firm interviews and b) summering? 

By stylish, I mean something like cropped trouser with loafers? Very 2018 style that looks amazing with no socks as well. 

Too risky for interview and/or summering? 

Don't spend money on fashion. You wouldn't want to be looking "very 2018" in your 2019 summer, would you?

Conservative picks will keep the boss happy and more importantly have a much longer useful lifespan, especially if you buy the good stuff.

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So then that's a no to Gucci deal sleds and Patagonia vests? :( How else will interviewers know I'm a hardo?

 

(It's an investment banking meme, don't worry I won't actually show up in that).

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Posted (edited)
4 hours ago, maximumbob said:

Dress conservatively for both interviews and summering.  You want to be known for the quality of your work, not your fashion choices.  

I believe you can, however, dress fashionable within the parameters of "conservative". Yes, you're safe with a dark charcoal suit, white shirt, grey tie, and black oxfords and belt. It borders on funeral wear though. And I dare say that that other side of the spectrum can be harmful because it can make you unmemorable. I'm saying this with the massive humongous crucial caveat that if you have no idea about fashion, then you absolutely should not test the waters!

Yet, there are ways to make your outfit pop a little, just enough to both make give a memorable impression. You don't also want to come off bland, and I've never gotten a negative comment about making fashionable (but conservative) choices. Even in interviews. Hearing "nice tie" or "great shoes" always feels good and can boost your confidence.

For interviews: If you wear a dark charcoal suit, I think a light blue shirt with a bright (not loud...bright) colour and pattern tie (eg polkas, or paisley) is better than white and grey and un-patterned. If you wear a navy suit, I think a white shirt and dark colour tie with a subtle or simple pattern (eg club or plaid) can look great. Matching colour oxfords and belts in both cases. I wouldn't wear any other colour for an interview and under no circumstances would I wear sockless loafers to an interview. The point here is that you shouldn't be scared to mix some colour and some pattern into your otherwise conservative outfit.

For summer: depends wear you work, but start with the same as your interview garb and if you sense there is room to play, then you can start adding shirts that are patterned or different (light) colours like pink. Or try different (still conservative) coloured or patterned suits. If you get compliments, great. If you get uncomfortable glares and negative comments, dial it back. But loafers, definitely no. Unless you're in government or over 50.

Edited by FineCanadianFXs
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