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gks18

Prospective U of T student wants information

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So,

 

 

 

I applied to U of T and Queen's, and would like to hear from current U of T students about the law school--atmosphere, academic/teaching quality, availability of financial aid, etc. Anything else you can think of. Why did you choose U of T? What was your second choice? Did you consider going out of province, and if so, where? Are you glad you chose U of T?

 

 

 

I've lived in Toronto all my life and am in fourth year at U of T doing English and math. I'll get in, I'm just wondering if you think it's worth the $16,000 and so forth.

 

 

 

Thanks.

 

 

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Hi there,

 

 

 

I just started at U of T so you might want to take my advice with a grain of salt. But my experience over the past few months has been fantastic. The people are really nice and friendly (not competitive backstabbers as you may have heard) and you never have a problem getting notes. The classes are really interesting and the professors are amazing. Not only have many of them written the textbook that you are reading but they are also extremely nice and open to questions (no matter how dumb!...I think I have tested this theory a few times). Also if there is an activity regarding law that you want to engage in, U of T is the place. If you can't find it, make a club of your own (which is what I and a few other first years have done). Financial aid is extremely generous to those in need (but apparently this is more in your first year than in subsequent years).

 

 

 

My second choice was Osgoode because I like you am from Toronto and really wanted to come back home after doing my undergrad at Queen's. However, I chose U of T for its international law component, since it is what I would like to pursue upon graduation.

 

 

 

I would recommend Queen's law school just for Kingston (it is an amazing college town). My recommendation is to visit both schools, particularly when they have their open house. I hope that helps!

 

 

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Thanks very much. I actually went over to visit the admissions office and expressed some concern about the tuition--the officer there gave my e-mail to a current law student who came from my college at U of T and she told me much the same thing.

 

 

 

I'm in the opposite position--having lived in Toronto all my life I almost wish U of T was in Vancouver or something. I'm going to be so sick of U of T. However the academic quality you mentioned is pretty important to me, esp. since I could possibly see myself going into academia.

 

 

 

I will visit both schools--but right now I'm leaning towards U of T.

 

 

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Hi OP, I just started at UofT as well and I would second the comments made by LawandorderFan. Just to let you know, I also went to UofT for undergrad and while I thought I would be sick of it by law they really are such different institutions. Law is pretty self-contained. It's great that you visited the admissions office; you should maybe come for a tour sometime!

 

 

 

Lawandorderfan: what club did you start?

 

 

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A working group under the International Human Rights Program called Shari'a Law. We hope to look at the human rights implications of applying Shari'a law in Canada as well as promote a better understanding of what it is. You should join!

 

 

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Re: availability of financial aid -- if you qualify, UofT's financial aid resources allow them to put their money where their mouth is. About 40 students each year attend tuition-free. You don't need to be living on the poverty line to qualify. But if your family's net income is in the six-figures, you may discover that your financial need is relatively low.

 

 

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Yes, I forgot to mention that too - the financial aid program is amazing. However I have heard that there can be a substantial variation from year to year but they are working to fix that.

 

 

 

ihate - yes I was at Osgoode, and transferred to UofT for this year.

 

 

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To the OP:

 

 

 

I have been at UT for 2 years now and think that the people in general are great. There are a few people that you meet who you will not get along with and that's just how it is in a group of almost 200 people.

 

 

 

I think that the professors are great and the dropoff from first year to second year has been negligible if any drop at all.

 

 

 

Everyone has been super helpful, with interviews going on for second year there are always people who are willing to share notes, people are always available to help out with anything you need. Upper years are very helpful for answering questions you have.

 

 

 

I was also considering McGill, but decided to leave Montreal after doing my undergrad there.

 

 

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Hey OP:

 

I was in your situation last year, wanting desperately to get away and wishing that UT was not in Toronto. Ultimately, I turned down UT's offer in favour of Dal, and I have never been happier in my life.

 

 

 

My suggestion - don't listen to friends who gawk at the name and rankings that put it wherever. Know yourself and what you want to get out of the law school experience.

 

 

 

I wanted non-corporate-minded friends, travel, and a focus on public service. Sure, you want the best legal education you can get, but you're going to get a great education pretty much wherever you go in Canada, and there is so much more that you can learn and experience over the next 3 years of your life.

 

 

 

I've already gone Sea Kayaking, taken a road trip to Cape Breton, spent Thanksgiving with a great group of Western-Canadians, been part of the biggest Pro Bono student program in Canada, bought A-level tickets to our world-class symphony for $15 each, and I have a fantastic view of the harbour from my apartment. Every Thursday night we all gather at the Keith's brewery pub to party hard, including: a fubar night, boat races, a crazy halloween bash, and awesome potlucks - the atmosphere here is phenomenal.

 

 

 

To top it off, I'm spending the summer in Europe on the $8,000 I saved by not going to UT.

 

 

 

Like I said, it was the best decision I've ever made. I'm listening to my gut from here on out, and I suggest you do the same.

 

 

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PS. It's much cheaper to go away to do your LL.B and come back to UT for the LL.M, if your plan is to go into academia.

 

 

 

Check it out. You'll still end up with a Toronto degree, for 1/8 the cost. Stick it to 'em!

 

 

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