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conge

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conge last won the day on September 28 2016

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  1. IMHO, it doesn't sound like that big of a deal; just learn from it and move on. Everyone is going to make mistakes, the difference between good lawyers and bad lawyers is that good lawyers get the mistakes out in the open with the ppl that matter ASAP and learn from their mistakes (and, ideally, don't fixate on them after the fact because that doesn't' help anyone). Depending on your relationship with the partner, I would find time on a slow afternoon to chat and reiterate that you know you messed up (specifically re. trying to hide, or at least not disclosing, the email you sent), that it was due to inexperience and wanting to please client, and that it will never happen again bc you've learned from this. ---> that may not be a good idea with all partners - really depends on your relationship.
  2. No. All major firms from TO, Calgary, Ottawa, and Vancouver OCI at Dal, and they don't go to UNB, but I don't think Dal grads have any special advantages or disadvantages compared to the other schools they OCI at.
  3. For me, this is all I would need to know to make a decision.
  4. Not at all. Some have already started.
  5. I was thinking more about the safety of the patients of the hospital - like getting advice on how best not to spread if you absolutely must go to the hospital.
  6. I sympathize with your position; I really do. Is there any professional advice available regarding visiting hospitals right now?
  7. I'm in-house. Last week we started the following: 1. Everyone work from home, if possible. 2. If you can't work from home, then you're on a rotating schedule so only a certain number of ppl are in the office at any time, and any meetings/events that required a gathering of ppl have been cancelled/moved to online meetings. 3. No work travel ("essential" work travel was allowed for awhile, but that ended last last week). 4. If you travel for personal reasons, you need to track your travel with an app that management monitors, and you cannot come back to office without a 14 day self isolation. This also applies if you feel sick at all, or if you have someone close to you that is sick or has traveled internationally. 5. Everyone is getting paid no matter what. The message is that this will continue for the foreseeable future, which is kind the scariest part. IT is figuring out what ppl need to work remotely for extended periods of time (docking stations, monitors, more VPN seats, etc.) So far, things are going remarkably well. We seem to be able to get things done and do business. If this actually lasts longer than the next couple of weeks, I expect issues will pop up.
  8. Agreed. I'm not entirely sure I'd be a corporate lawyer if I didn't graduate with a bunch of debt; the decision to take the highest paid job in my jurisdiction was an easy choice to make at the time...maybe it would have been different if I had less debt or other areas paid better.
  9. I was just taking you at your word that it was below minimum wage. In any case, I don't work in this area and I'm not familiar with standard of pay, but it seems low to me, and folks here seem to concur.
  10. Unpaid articling positions are unfortunate, but not unheard of. On one hand, you should be happy you are getting paid articles in an area of law that you are interested in, on the other hand, I have a hard time believing less than min wage is on the "high end" - that just seems like a ridiculous statement unless most students in criminal law are doing it for free.
  11. Depends on your practice area, I think. When I was doing a lot of private M&A and real estate, it was valuable. Now that I'm in-house doing something more narrow, it has very little value, and if my company didn't pay for it, I def would not keep my membership.
  12. When I attended law school, my financial situation wasn't all that different. I was starting with roughly $70k in the whole. I've been lucky with my employment but I wasn't working on Bay Street. (I started at a regional law firm in Atlantic Canada; it's a larger firm than most Bay Street firms but only pays it's junior associates $55k-$60k starting salaries.) I'm several years out of law school now, and I can unequivocally say it was an excellent financial decision for me.
  13. If I had to choose a place to live for 10 years, it would be Ottawa, no question. (I lived there for a bit and really liked it.) But for law school for three years, my gut is telling me Kingston. This is totally just a personal opinion based on no objective criteria like tuition, possible internships, etc., which you should totally take into account.
  14. I didn't go to either school. But, all other things being equal, if I were you, I'd go to Queen's. Ottawa is nice place, but it's not a huge city.
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