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elpolitomijo

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  1. Yeah haha, I'm not trying to come across as sanctimonious or a hater against big law attorneys or anything like that. I have a few corporate lawyer friends and I fully understand why people go into those roles. Let's face it, big law has some benefits... But after spending the past few years on that side of fence I just know it isn't for me anymore. ¯\_(ツ)_/¯
  2. I guess I'd rather be fighting on the side of the public (even if it's on behalf of a pension fund) than on the side of some rapacious PE firm. I worked at a hedge fund - I know how these guys operate haha
  3. *sadface* yeah this what I was afraid of. It seems like we just love our monopolies here in Canada...
  4. By "making a difference" I guess I mean not working for corporate monopolies or helping to erode regulations. I'd be happy in any legal job where I'm fighting for the "little guy." (you can tell I have a bit of a david v. goaliath complex haha). I'd also prefer to do litigation. The plaintiff side is an option I've considered, however I don't know much about the landscape here in Canada. Again, I could be wrong about this, but my perception is that plaintiff litigation isn't as active here in Canada as it is in the US. What would be the Canadian equivalent of a Keker Van Nest or Sussman here? Is there a Canadian version of bill lerach? I guess I could try and work for those aforementioned firms but I doubt I'd get in given my LSAT score hahaha...
  5. I’m a 0L and in true type-A, insecure-overachiever form, I’m already thinking about my future career path (you can tell I already have the lawyer personality down). Call me a quixotic fool, but I’m a mature student and decided to quit my cushy, well-paying job to attend law school in order to chase this vague notion of “making a difference in the world.” I did my undergrad in business and genuinely find finance/ economics interesting. I already read securities filings on my spare time and enjoy building models in Excel. I would love to practice law in a field that deals with these types of concepts. The thing is, I don’t want to sell my soul to big law and work for the “bad guys.” I already know a bunch miserable corporate lawyers and I get the sense that I would not enjoy the lifestyle. My dream job would be working at something like the SEC or the Antitrust division of the DOJ (Alas, I cannot work at these places because I’m a Canadian citizen). That said, it seems like the Canadian equivalents of these organizations are watered-down and neutered. I’ve been doing some research, and it just seems like Canada seems to go very easy on white collar criminals. I was reading the OSC’s recent news releases and all I see are posts extolling how they “are removing the regulatory burdens for corporations and making it easier for companies to do business here!” I was also reading an interview with the ex-chief of the Canada Competition Bureau and he claims that the Canadian government tends to encourage the formation of corporate monopolies [0]. When was the last time the DOJ launched a major antitrust case against a company here in Canada? Finally, it seems like our government seems to promote our terribly opaque banking laws. I read somewhere that Canada is considered one of the world’s eminent money-laundering hubs, which makes sense given the proliferation of numbered corporations and lax disclosure laws (who do you think is buying up all those condos in downtown Toronto/ Vancouver?) It also seems like white collar crime isn’t prosecuted by DA/ Crown attorney offices to the same degree as it is in certain jurisdictions in the US (like the SDNY). All in all, this is to say that I don’t think a legal career at the OSC or the Competition Bureau would satisfy my yearning to “make a difference in the world.” My question: would any of the already-lawyers on this forum agree with my characterization? Am I completely wrong (I hope so)? Are there any good legal career options that deal extensively with economics/ finance AND are on the side of the “good guys” here in Canada? Is a soul crushing career in big law the only way to get exposure to the intersection of law and finance? [0] https://thetyee.ca/News/2019/03/19/Monopoly-Friendly-Canada-Competition-Policy/
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