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TheMidnightOil

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  1. If you're stats are accurate, I'm especially surprised that you didn't get in through the regular category. Cheering for you for the holistic round.
  2. Don't be so discouraged. Just focus on school for now, and tackle the LSAT at around August of the year before you want to enter. You're just winding yourself up by stressing out like this on the forums.
  3. This matter is further complexified by the fact this this individual has ducks -- not seals -- as their profile picture.
  4. I think three-year applicants are those between 60-89 (inclusive) credits before the deadline -- they have two years completed, and are currently in their third year.
  5. I'm pretty sure that 3- and 4-year applicants are treated the same, but you can email the law recruiter to be safe.
  6. I think I had four different majors in my undergrad at various points in time. You can email the adcom if you're concerned, but I highly doubt that they care. And don't worry excessively about law school stuff right now if you haven't even reached third year. Ease up and just focus on your grades for now.
  7. The LSAT Trainer (which I recommend [well, for LR and RC]) comes with a few study planners with suggested hours per week / total weeks to complete the book along with practice drills and tests. I think there are 4, 8, 12, and 16 week planners on the website (I recommend doing at least 3 months of prep unless you're an LSAT natural). Generally, 3-6 months should be enough time to get a decent score, and maybe 1+ year if you need a really high score (which even then isn't a guarantee). Also check the /r/LSAT subreddit's sidebar for more resources.
  8. Here's a table for approximate LSAT score to percentile: https://www.lsac.org/lsat-interpretive-guide/2019-2020 Very few people are naturals at the LSAT. You need to prepare formally for it. 1: Write a diagnostic LSAT practice test under timed conditions and no preparation. There are a couple of free ones at LSAC's lawhub site. Pay them something like $100 USD and you get access to tons of them for a year. Don't be disheartened by a low score. 2: Buy prep books and/or a prepping service. Good books are Kim's LSAT Trainer, Powerscore's LG/LR/RC Bibles, Cassidy's Loophole in Logical Reasoning, and the like. 7Sage is a well-acclaimed prep course. 3. Follow whatever study plans come with the books/services. The Trainer comes with several, 7sage should come with a few as well.
  9. I thought that they make no distinction between 3- and 4-year admits? It's the 2-years that get special scrutiny.
  10. This is going to turn into another rankings thread. I feel it. I feel it in my bones.
  11. If applying next year, I highly recommend getting confirmation from the law recruiter some time during the summer whether they're taking highest LSAT or average LSAT for 2022.
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