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TheRealMikeRoss

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  1. You’re correct, Queen’s does look at best 2. I recently emailed them and this is part of the response I received: “Queen’s Law looks at your best two years. We define a “best year” as your highest scoring Fall & Winter terms that were completed at a full load.”
  2. In the exact same situation but my outlier grade this term is a B+, decisions decisions.
  3. That’s good to hear. Do you think that a “pass” would look worse if I only have 3 years worth of grades compared to the traditional 4? I will graduate in 3 years from my 4-year degree instead of 4 due to advanced standing credits, and so every grade will have more of an effect on my CGPA since I’ll have less classes and subsequent grades overall compared to most other applicants. I know In the grand scheme of things a B+ isn’t the end of the world but with me only having 3 years worth of grades and the B+ lowering my gpa by 0.13 points, it’s hard to not think of the positives of using the “pass” option. I also wanted to see the negative implications of the “pass” option and emailed some law schools I am interested in applying to (U of T, Queen’s, Western, and still waiting on OZ). Western and U of T said that a pass will be looked at worse than a letter grade because I’m choosing to use it (it isn’t mandatory), and that the more grades on the transcript the better it is for the applicant (but wouldn’t a higher GPA look better for them in terms of admissions)? Queens said it doesn’t matter since I have the necessary 8 classes this year so it’ll help my gpa with them.
  4. This all makes sense and I agree, the reason I even debated using the pass option in the first place is because the B+ lowers my GPA by 0.13 points on the OLSAS scale, so quite a significant drop. I also forgot to mention that even though I am a first year I am technically considered a second year undergrad student due to advanced standing credits granted from previous community college studies, so I’ll graduate in 3 years and only have 3 years worth of grades on my transcripts and won’t be eligible for any “drops”, and so keeping the GPA as high as possible is extremely important in my situation since each letter grade will have more of an impact on my gpa since there’ll be less of them, if that makes sense. On the other hand I know I’ll be looked at worse than someone who doesn’t have pass/fail courses on their transcript if we have the same GPA. I’m not sure how often this happens realistically though so it’s a difficult choice.
  5. Hey everyone, I am an undergrad student and future law school applicant and I have a question that I’m hoping somebody on here knows the answer to. I know this question has been asked in the past but I’ve read conflicting answers so I’m hoping somebody here can help clear things up. I have a B+ In one of my classes which isn’t a bad grade but it will negatively impact my gpa. My school is allowing us to receive one satisfactory/unsatisfactory grade for a class this term due to COVID, and I’m wondering how a “Satisfactory” grade will look on my transcript in regards to law school applications? Will it be looked at negatively or will it not make a difference since lots of applicants will have a pass/fail on their transcripts due to these circumstances? I wouldn’t want admissions officers to think I did worse than I actually did in the course if I do go with the pass option, but I also wouldn’t want to lower my gpa and decrease my chances of being accepted. Basically I’m asking if it’s worth it to remove the B+ from my transcript or if I should just stick with it and lower my gpa. Thank you.
  6. Hey all, I had a quick question that I can’t seem to find information on and thought I’d throw it on here and see if anybody can help clear things up. Does anybody know how much weight is put on community college grades when law schools look at your application? I have a college diploma which was looked at by my uni to get me accepted into my undergrad program, but college grades aren’t used to calculate my university GPA. Law schools in Ontario from what I’ve read only use university grades to determine your gpa for admission, however one of them said they would “review and assess my college transcript”. Does anybody know how much my college grades would matter to law schools if they aren’t used for my CGPA? Thank you
  7. Hey everyone, First of all I want to congratulate everyone who received their May LSAT scores today! Reading everyone’s posts made me excited to start my journey towards taking my first LSAT! I’ve been reading this thread religiously lately to search for an answer to my question, however my situation is unique and thought I’d make a post to see if anybody has experienced a similar scenario in the past. I am 21 years old and a recent community college graduate. I’ve taken a couple gap years; one after high school, and now this one as I have been working since I graduated college last summer. My plan has always been to go to law school, and I am starting to work on obtaining my undergraduate degree in the upcoming fall. Thanks to my college diploma, I have been granted transfer credits from the university which I’ll be attending and will be able to graduate in 3 years instead of the traditional 4, following a normal 5 courses per term work load. This raised some questions in my mind as to when the best time would be to take the LSAT, since I want to give myself a year to study for it before taking it. I am currently planning on taking the test in June the year before I plan to start law school, to allow myself some room for retakes if needed. If I start studying for the LSAT next summer (2021) and take it the following year (2022) I’ll only have 2 years worth of university grades for law schools to use to determine my CGPA, where as if I take the LSAT after I graduate undergrad I’ll have to take another gap year until I potentially start law school the following fall, which I would like to avoid if possible. I know some law schools will send out conditional acceptances based on your final year of grades if they only have a couple of years worth of university grades to look at, so I was wondering if anyone else has been in the same boat and what everyone’s thoughts and experiences are. I guess it boils down to when you think the best time would be for myself to take the LSAT and not put my application at a disadvantage. Sorry for the long post!
  8. Thank you for taking the time to write such a detailed reply, it definitely helped clear things up!
  9. Hey everyone, I am new to this thread and thought I’d ask a question that I’ve been looking into and can’t seem to find a solid answer to. I am an Ontario undergrad student but my end goal is to practice law in BC. I know that It’s recommended to go to law school where you want to practice so I’m very interested in attending Allard School of Law at UBC in the near future. I have attended community college and graduated, and in turn have a certificate in Pre-Service Firefighter Education and Training, and a Fire Sciences advanced college diploma. I have a couple of questions regarding the Admissions process of applying to law school and GPA calculations; I will be eligible to graduate and obtain my undergraduate university Honours BA degree in three years, due to advanced standing/ transfer credits which were granted to me by the university I’m attending ( I get 30 credits which translates to not having to take 10 elective classes, and they can only be used for electives). I was granted those transfer credits from classes I took while obtaining my college diploma. If those transfer credits are applied towards my degree and I do in fact graduate a year earlier, will my college grades be included in the GPA calculation along with my university grades since they’ll show up on the university transcript? And whether if I choose to go with a different program instead which doesn't grant me any transfer credits, if that will in turn make my university grades the only grades used to calculate my GPA for admission? I have been looking on this thread and on others but can’t seem to find a solid answer as to whether or not UBC will consider my community college grades in conjunction with my university grades for admission and if that’s the case if there’s any way to avoid that happening, or if they’ll only look at my undergrad university grades to determine my GPA which is the preferable outcome? I know that here in Ontario OLSAS doesn’t use college grades to calculate CGPA but I’m not sure what it’s like in BC. Apologies If this has already been answered in a previous thread, still a newbie on here.
  10. Hey all, As a recent lurker of this thread I thought I would pick your brains and see if you know anything about my current situation and can possibly offer some advice if anyone has had similar questions/experiences in the past. Apologies if this isn’t in the correct forum, first time poster. A little bit of a background; I am beginning my journey towards an undergraduate degree this upcoming fall and planning on applying to law schools afterwards. I am a recent community college graduate and have a college certificate in Pre-Service Firefighter Education and Training, as well as a Fire Sciences advanced college diploma. I will be eligible to graduate from university and earn my Honours BA degree in 3 years instead of the traditional 4, thanks to transfer credits earned from college courses I took while obtaining my diploma. I have a couple of questions regarding the Admissions process of applying to law school and GPA calculations; as mentioned above I will be eligible to graduate and obtain my undergraduate university degree in three years, due to advanced standing/ transfer credits which were granted to me by the university I will be attending ( I get 30 credits which translates to not having to take 10 elective classes, and they can only be used for electives). If those transfer credits are applied towards my degree and I do in fact graduate a year earlier, will my college grades be included in the GPA calculation along with my university grades since they’ll show up on the university transcript? And whether if I choose to go with a different program instead which doesn't grant me any transfer credits, if that will in turn make my university grades the only grades used to calculate my GPA for admission? The university I will be attending this fall considered my college grades for admission. They are respectable but definitely not where I want them to be, mainly due to not planning to further my education at the time which has changed recently. I would like to avoid my college grades being included in CGPA calculations if possible, and have read lots of different opinions and thoughts on this and was curious if anyone can clear things up who’s been in a similar situation. I have emailed all of the law schools’ admission teams with my situation in order to get the most up to date information, but with the Covid situation they’re most likely swamped, and I guess sitting at home has made me impatient and thought I’d post this on here. I realize I have a while to go until applying to law school, but I haven’t been able to find a lot of information on this specific topic and wanted to see if anyone on here can help clear things up, and potentially answer this question for anyone else who’s wondering the same things I am.
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