Jump to content

pierremenard

Members
  • Content Count

    17
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Community Reputation

17 Neutral

About pierremenard

  • Rank

Recent Profile Visitors

354 profile views
  1. Ah found it, nevermind. If anyone's curious: https://www.lso.ca/becoming-licensed/lawyer-licensing-process/articling-candidates/finding-a-placement/2022-toronto-summer-student-recruitment-procedures
  2. @leavemealone Would you mind posting the link?
  3. Hitchens was a brilliant, but complicated and undeniably flawed, man. An ex-Trotskyist (read: Marxist), militant atheist who was discarded as a darling of the left after his outspoken support for the Iraq War. I encourage everyone to read his memoir, Hitch-22. He can be self-aggrandizing, but he had a fascinating life, including being smacked on the ass by Margaret Thatcher in a particularly hilarious episode. And even if you hate his politics, the man could turn a phrase like no other. I fondly remember his quip on Fox News when asked to give his opinion on the late televangelist Jerry Falwell: "If you gave him an enema he could be buried in a matchbox" On the actual topic of the thread, I just want to throw another hat in the ring for mindfulness/meditation. It's hard to understand how little control you have over the thoughts that appear in our heads until take a step back and notice them as they appear. We really are on auto-pilot most of the time. If you meditate enough you may discover that the self is itself an illusion, although that takes some serious practice. The alternative is to take a hefty dose of LSD or psilocybin; that'll get you there too and have you smelling roses in a whole new way.
  4. Just to return to Sam Harris, it really is unfortunate that he's gotten grouped in with Peterson, Rubin, and people like Brett Weinstein in some made-up "Intellectual Dark Web". I believe the origins of the term can be traced to a feature by Bari Weiss, who incidentally left the NYT today, but really only apply to their positions on the censoring of college speakers and cancel culture. Sam probably didn't help himself by having public conversations with all these folks. The problem is that Sam is most often not discussing those issues on his podcast, and his meditation app (Waking Up) has nothing to do with anything political or even remotely controversial. As people like Rubin and Shapiro slide further into insanity, Harris is often just damaged by association. Back in the day, Sam was part of another made-up group with Christopher Hitchens (bae), Richard Dawkins, and Daniel Dennett--the Four Horsemen of Atheism. The difference is that all these guys were mostly speaking about atheism and religion at the time, and were actually on the same page about most things.
  5. One way to test whether your diagramming is out of wack is to take some LG sections completely untimed. You should be able to get a LG section pretty much 100% correct without time constraint. If you're still getting around 15 correct, then it's likely you're not diagramming effectively. Remember, your diagram should visually represent all of the rules in a fool-proof way; you should never be referring back to the written rules on questions, because it's all on your diagram. Once you've got that sorted (and you do need to get it sorted), then you can focus on timed drilling. As at @AllanRCsaid, LG is about drilling, drilling, and more drilling. I get the feeling that a lot of the posters here who struggle with the section simply are not drilling enough games. There's also a right way and a wrong way to drill. The wrong way is to drill a game section, get 15 or so correct, review your answers immediately, and then never encounter that game again. LG is all about practice, and if you haven't completed an individual game with 100% accuracy under timed conditions, then you haven't mastered that game. What I'd recommend is make 3-4 copies of 20 or so of the most recent game sections, so 80 total games. First, you do the game under timed conditions stopping right at the 35 minute mark. Second, without correcting your answers, you revisit the game immediately with no time constraint. Maybe you couldn't figure out some questions or ran out of time on the last game--deal with those aspects here. Wait at least 24 hours (you can do more games in this period) before correcting the section and watching the associated 7sage video. Forget about the game for 3-4 days. Next comes the fun part. If you got even a single question wrong on any individual game, you MUST retake that game under timed conditions until you get it perfect, hence the 3-4 clean copies of each game. This method will feel tedious, and it is, but it also works. TLDR: to be a master game-taker, you need to do a lot of games, and do the same games again until you get them right. The LSAT and LG especially is a test that rewards hard work. Good luck!
  6. Take the LSAT again if you really want to go to UofT. It sounds like logic games are your main issue, something that's only exacerbated by the stress of test day. I was the exact same way and ended up canceling my first LSAT due to a complete implosion on the games section. If you really want to push up to and past that 170 threshold, games need to become second nature. The method I recommend is the double-blind review. You can use Powerscore (or whatever book's) diagramming techniques for linear, grouping, etc. Double-blind review simply refers to the way you attack the games, only completely moving on from a game when you've finished it perfectly under timed conditions. Your goal is to then buy 30-40 practice tests and complete as many games as possible in the next two months. The folks at 7sage describe it much better than I can: https://7sage.com/how-to-get-a-perfect-score-on-the-logic-games/ Games were the bane of my existence, but once I adopted this method and began to take them in little pockets during the day, my scores steadily improved up to the 170 mark. It's much harder to lose your nerve on test-day with a tricky grouping game when you've logged 45 perfect grouping games. All that being said, I echo the other commenters: UofT is a great school (I'm headed there myself), but it's one of many fantastic schools in Canada. And if you're goal is Toronto post-grad, Queens, Western, Osgoode, and host of other schools will get you there too, probably with more money in your pocket.
  7. Nope and I'm in the same position as you--had applied before the email saying spaces aren't reserved for law students this year. Hopefully we'll find out soon either way. What areas/neighborhoods are you looking at if Grad House doesn't pan out?
  8. From the UofT JD program FAQ sent to students: "If your health and living circumstances allow you to attend classes and other activities in person, we strongly recommend that you do so as much as possible. At the same time, we will provide excellent course content and meaningful learning opportunities to students who are working remotely." They also say you "should start looking for housing as soon as possible". Will there be an orientation? "Yes! We are working hard to put together a fabulous orientation experience that will have in-person and online elements."
  9. From the FAQ: "If your health and living circumstances allow you to attend classes and other activities in person, we strongly recommend that you do so as much as possible." Sounds like I'll be moving to Toronto in August. It would be disappointing to have it all be for 3 classes a week, but it does sound like UofT will do all it can to have as much in-person programming as possible. The only thing worse than having the entire semester online would be for most of the classes/extracurriculars to be in person, and me to be stuck at home. Time to start online shopping for winter coats...
  10. It seems insane to me for UofT Law School to run a genuine mixed model. I'll be moving cross-country for law school, and paying Toronto rent on top of the stress of moving for 1 or 2 seminar meetings a week is not appealing in the slightest. It's great for students who already live in Toronto, but what about everyone else? To be fair, it's not clear from the roadmap posted that the Faculty will actually go this direction, only that they may be considering it. Med school (after year 1) is an example of where how online learning is just not feasible. For Law, when the alternative is an 80-student Contracts lecture, I just don't see any scenario when most of this fall in in person. With this reality sinking in, I have to say I'm mostly just glum at the stunted social experience in 1L. I hate talking with the friends I already have on Zoom, how am I supposed to make new ones on the blasted app? Who knows, maybe it'll be this big bonding experience for all of us. It should at least be great cocktail fodder in 15 years, "Ah yes, Corona class of '23--I was really there, but not physically of course *chortle* *chortle*."
  11. This is what I did to prepare for the test and it worked well for me. Buy two or three of the batches of ten actual LSATs for something like $20 on Amazon, and practice taking actual LSAT sections. Make copies of all of the tests. Use the double blind review method: take the section in 35 minutes with strict timing (marking any questions you're unsure of) then try the unclear questions/ones you didn't get to with no time restriction. Wait a day and only then correct your answers. Pay particular attention to any answers you got wrong but did not mark as "unsure" in your first run through. Keep a running tab of all questions you get wrong; these will be exceedingly useful later in your studying, as you can return and take a combined "section" made up purely of questions you previously got wrong. For Logic Games, retake each game you get at least one or more questions wrong on at least two more times. No single game should be in your rearview mirror until you've done it perfectly and under timed conditions. 7sage is very helpful for LG at least--their video explanations on their website are excellent (and free). The more actual LSAT tests you take, and the more questions you've seen, the better. This method is time intensive, but incredibly effective. If you're aiming for a 170+ score, that's the kind of work you need to put in.
  12. I posted this in another thread, but I really think this method is effective if you're willing to really put in the hours. Buy one or two of the batches of ten actual LSATs for something like $20 on Amazon, and practice taking actual LSAT sections. Make copies of all of the tests. Use the double blind review method: take the section in 35 minutes with strict timing (marking any questions you're unsure of) then try the unclear questions/ones you didn't get to with no time restriction. Wait a day and only then correct your answers. Pay particular attention to any answers you got wrong but did not mark as "unsure" in your first run through. Keep a running tab of all questions you get wrong; these will be exceedingly useful later in your studying, as you can return and take a combined "section" made up purely of questions you previously got wrong. For Logic Games, retake each game you get at least one or more questions wrong on at least two more times. This method is time intensive, but incredibly effective. If you're aiming for a 170+ score, that's the kind of work you need to put in
  13. Buy one or two of the batches of ten actual LSATs for something like $20 on Amazon, and practice taking actual LSAT sections. Make copies of all of the tests. Use the double blind review method: take the section in 35 minutes with strict timing (marking any questions you're unsure of) then try the unclear questions/ones you didn't get to with no time restriction. Wait a day and only then correct your answers. Pay particular attention to any answers you got wrong but did not mark as "unsure" in your first run through. Keep a running tab of all questions you get wrong; these will be exceedingly useful later in your studying, as you can return and take a combined "section" made up purely of questions you previously got wrong. For Logic Games, retake each game you get at least one or more questions wrong on at least two more times. @OnlyResident is right on 7sage for LG at least--their video explanations are excellent (and free). This method is time intensive, but incredibly effective. If you're aiming for a 170+ score, that's the kind of work you need to put in.
  14. Thanks for making this thread--some very helpful info already. Couple of questions: 1. In your own experience, what do most law students opt for in the way of accommodation? How important is it to be within walking distance of the law building? 2. You may not have an answer to this one, but do you have any sense how UofT would try to replace some of the social/community aspects of school in the event that classes move online in the fall?
  15. Just use the free 7sage videos for logic games and buy one of the powerscore books for the other sections if you're struggling with those. I highly recommend the 7sage foolproof method for studying the LG though--that's what put me over the 170 edge: https://7sage.com/how-to-get-a-perfect-score-on-the-logic-games/ No need to shell out a bunch of money
×
×
  • Create New...