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HouseOfPolycarbonate

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  1. I "speed read" for something like that too, but it just seems like you could keep your PR book and index open the whole time on another part of the table, to quickly switch between it and the section you're on. It seems like it might be worthwhile though. I might take your suggestion. Thanks
  2. Would this not potentially be a strategy that ends up taking more time? I mean, because you have to read the question to figure out if it's PR or not, and then when you go back to answer it, you have to read it again. Additionally, does anyone have any tips on distinguishing a PR question from say an Estates question? I just mean that the other sections also ask questions that are similar to PR, in the sense of "what should you do if" and then asks about a specific scenario with a client, etc.
  3. Thank you very much for this post and your insight. The investigations practice sounds interesting. Are you able to explain in more detail what this is?
  4. Hi, I understand that I put many specifications on this. So a wider range of positions that don't fit all the specifications would also be appreciated. But to clarify, I'm not sure how you interpreted what I wrote, but I didn't mean a job where you would not be working for a couple of weeks at a time, a couple of times a year, but just where such work during this period of a couple of weeks would be able to be done without having to attend in person anywhere (e.g. you could still take phone calls, video calls, send work electronically, etc). I get your point though, I am really limiting the suggestions that I would get.
  5. My initial reaction to this was a strong no, as I have heard that the pay is very low, and that more and more of this work is being outsourced overseas. Am I incorrect?
  6. Huh, that's really interesting. Could you explain why some HNWIs may prefer to have someone of a different ethnicity serve them? Also, I know almost nothing about immigration law. When you say organizational client, do you mean companies looking to hire foreign labour? How remunerative are both types of immigration law practices? For a solo practice, is the less retail oriented model impracticable?
  7. How important is it to have an "in" within the community? E.g. is it important to share the same ethnicity? Edit, is this kind of area of law where it is important to work in a major city? E.g. Toronto, Vancouver, etc?
  8. Hmm, what is a word that means "not at all" in an even more forceful way? Hah! (But nonetheless, it is a valid suggestion.)
  9. Hi! I am wondering if anyone has any suggestions for areas of law, or even careers that wouldn't involve practicing the law as a lawyer, but careers where experience as a lawyer could be leveraged in order to work for yourself/go solo, and working without a secretary or assistant. Something where maybe you could just work from home all the time (although permitting having to leave to travel to interview people, or mediate, attend court, etc, depending on the specific career), and for maybe 3 or 4 weeks a couple of times a year, you wouldn't have to be physically present anywhere specific (e.g. wouldn't have to do the aforementioned interviewing of people, or going to court, or meeting with clients), but you would still be working remotely during this time. I have read about things like becoming a mediator, but does anyone have any other ideas?
  10. Oh that's very interesting then. Maybe you're in the minority then? I'm not sure how their workloads compare to undergrad, but I certainly wouldn't call their work ethic bare minimum (it's far from that). Edit, perhaps they'd do as well if they reduced their workload? I am not sure, but they don't seem to have tried that (at least on the surface from what I can see).
  11. Eek, not sure what you mean by bare minimum work ethic, although you've perhaps elaborated a bit with your reference to "needed to review a good summary or create your own". But as someone who knows a few medalists (although not intimately), work ethic is a core component of their academic performance. It is certainly no where near what I would call "bare minimum". They're all absolutely among the hardest workers (not saying that there aren't students that work harder, there may be?). I think I may also disagree with the "greater interest in the work/law" hypothesis as well. I'm not sure I've noticed this having anything to do with it (re: what the other poster mentioned)
  12. As others have said, if you aren't really losing much from transferring, then it might be reasonable to take the risk.
  13. You've been together for 1.5 years. Observe all the relationships that you've known that have lasted that long and later failed, and try to be as objective as possible. Keep that in mind. Statistically, there is a very good chance that your relationship will not last. If you haven't even lived with each other for a particularly long period, you probably don't even know each other very well. Long distance makes it even harder to get to know someone. Just be careful with your sacrifices. You may feel one way, and project those feelings onto someone else, but they may not feel similarly. This happens all the time, not just with intimate relationships. It's hard to see, and can bite you in the end. Pay attention to sacrifices he has made to this point. They're evidence of his investment in your relationship. If he hasn't made any significant ones, I think it's difficult to judge how serious he is about the relationship. Sorry, it's just that you're in love, and it makes being objective more difficult. This post will probably seem a lot more prescient in hindsight, if your relationship does not last, and you read it through the lens of someone no longer in the relationship. This may all seem very cynical, but I'm really just suggesting that you be more careful.
  14. Please come back and let us know how you felt about the process.
  15. Many law students are insecure braggarts, whether they do well, or not. You may have noticed a handful of them even on this forum. Tune it out. I think that law school may particularly attract insecure people, but this I am not sure of. Any perceived advantage in this regard is shortlived, and quickly disappears once you've spent even only a couple of hours reading cases. Seriously, don't even worry about this. Edit: you'll learn to appreciate the humble law students you meet 10x more due to this.
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