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meandtheboys

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meandtheboys last won the day on April 29

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  1. I wrote my LSAT just as I started second year. I wouldn't say that everyone should do this, but there's honestly no reason not to do it if you wanted to. If anything, writing early can be beneficial - you can get it out of the way before you have to focus on school, and it gives you another chance to write it again if you're not happy with your score. Studying for it early on in undergrad can also help your GPA in the next few years, since the mindset you need to do well on the LSAT also translates to better writing and reading skills that could help you do better in your classes. That being said, don't jump the gun and plan how long you will study for without first doing a diagnostic.
  2. Lol the 1L ambassadors literally said the class is finalized. Last year's waitlist might have shown movement, but given the situation this year with covid the situation is quite different. It's more likely that people would want to make up their minds early about moving or staying home, which affects when they would firmly decide.
  3. I wouldn't know if people have accepted other schools, but from what I can tell a lot of people have already made plans to move to Van and don't seem intent on pulling out. Even those who aren't moving here are pretty firmly decided on UBC.
  4. If OP used one of these companies and couldn't get in with good stats, that should say something about the company's ability (or lack thereof).
  5. I think this is a more prevalent thing in the US that seems to have appeared in Canada more recently. Admissions here are much more straightforward than down in the US, so it seems to me that these "agents" are just taking advantage of students here who either aren't familiar enough with applications or aren't confident enough when applying. Anything these people are paid to do could just be done by 0Ls for free, and I doubt these "agents" have even gone through law school or the admissions process themselves - otherwise they wouldn't need to make a living off this kind of work. I, for one, would be willing to help you for free with this kind of stuff, and I'm sure at least some others here would too. That aside, I don't have much to add since the others here have already mentioned language ability as the one thing you need to work on. Other than that your stats seem good enough for admission. Good luck!
  6. FYI the 1L ambassadors told us last week that the class is full and pretty much finalized, so if you guys have other acceptances I'd suggest not to wait on UBC.
  7. They are all weighted 1/3 each unless your index is above the autoadmit threshold (92). In my year it seems like nobody with a 92+ had their PS read. You're safely over the autoadmit index so even if you had a bad PS, you would get in on stats alone.
  8. I'm not as familiar with CVs as PSs, but you are always welcome to message me about your PS and I'd be happy to go over it for you
  9. This is good advice. I'm always happy to look over PSs! Shoot me a message anytime.
  10. Same here! Shoot me a message and I can take a look.
  11. At this point you aren't even taking into consideration the advice people are giving you - you're just looking for validation that you have a chance despite having objectively weak stats. If you're not willing to engage in good faith and entertain the idea of not getting in due to your weak stats, why even post here and argue with people who are taking time out of their day to help you?
  12. While it's probably not the path for everyone, I wouldn't go so far as to recommend that nobody apply in third year. I worked throughout undergrad as well, didn't stress, didn't lose sleep, and still got accepted without a problem to one of the schools OP is aiming for (UBC). As long as you plan far enough ahead and are 100% committed to going to law school, I don't see a problem in applying early. If OP is still reading this thread, UBC doesn't care if you don't finish undergrad. Keep in mind that they don't look at L2/B2/B3 like other schools do and just look at cGPA. If your 165 is an actual score, take a look at our accepted threads to see roughly what GPA you'll need.
  13. I meant that @BlockedQuebecois' assessment of Bay Street (I guess West Georgia/Burrard here?) firms representing corporate as well as FN interests at roughly the same rate is correct, from my experience. You mention disputes, but I think contrary to popular belief there actually aren't many disputes between FNs and corporations. Most of the work we do on behalf of FNs is consultation and accommodation work alongside corporations represented by large firms, not litigation against them. On Fasken's website, for instance, many of the aboriginal law files they have listed are also files we've worked on together - just from the FN side. Since this is a large portion of our files you could say that re: consultation and accommodation, boutiques like ours would do the bulk of the work for FNs, and that in this case large firms are representing corporate interests. However, for high-stakes litigation, FNs tend to go with larger firms. One client that comes to mind has our firm as the go-to for general work and Specific Claims, but went with Gowlings back when they were challenging the pipeline ruling. It's also not uncommon for FNs to have large firms act as general counsel or do corporate work. Especially when it comes to high-stakes litigation, large firms are doing the bulk of the work and are directly representing FN interests. Basically, there is some aboriginal law work that is exclusive to boutiques and some that is exclusive to large firms. There's also some general work that could be done by either. It evens out to roughly the same for large firms.
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