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Tagger

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Tagger last won the day on August 30

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  1. Choose another person like this; that's why UBC asks discretionary applicants for reference letters.
  2. Absolutely not. A bird in the hand is worth two in the bush.
  3. Your professor likely hasn't had to seek employment in 10+ years, don't rely on them too much.
  4. In this case, @Mihael is correct; UVic's class profile doesn't fluctuate much from year to year. You can check the 2016, 2017, 2018, and 2019 first-year class demographics for yourself.
  5. Worry about the diversity of a city, not the diversity of a law school. Law schools are already relatively diverse.
  6. UVic publishes this demographic chart every year: https://www.uvic.ca/law/assets/docs/admissfinaid/LSAT-GPA Demographic Chart.pdf All but two matriculants scored 159 or higher, and the two that didn't had 4.0+ GPAs.
  7. You're letting your own low LSAT score colour the overly rosy advice that you're giving to a fellow applicant. This happens every year, and for the most part, it doesn't do anyone any good.
  8. Feeling Good: The New Mood Therapy by David D. Burns.
  9. This is the 13th thread you've created about this grand plan of yours in the span of four days. You're planning to apply in two years, so right now, you don't have any final grades and aren't close to taking the LSAT. You're wasting everyone's time.
  10. @rlystressed,1L midterms aren't worth much because your professors want you to treat them as a learning experience. Betray your username and don't stress about them too much.
  11. It's extremely obvious that OP doesn't fit this description. From the looks of it, OP's a first-year undergrad who's trying to time their degree and law school application(s) so that their GPA is comprised of two years' worth of grades from lower-level / easier courses. It's a plan that can easily backfire because many law schools (including UBC) make offers to third-year applicants conditional on maintaining the same or higher academic average in their final year.
  12. Many of your friends who received Bs and As on this assignment will likely receive a C+ or two over the course of the next three years. That applies to you, too: you might've gotten a C+ today, but that doesn't mean you won't get Bs or As down the road. Law school is a rollercoaster, and learning to roll with the punches is key to surviving it. That's what makes the good moments so sweet.
  13. Your post history suggests that (i) you don't have an actual GPA or LSAT score yet and (ii) you're desperate to attend law school without completing your undergraduate degree. Why is that? Being the youngest person in your cohort isn't a badge of honour and can work against you.
  14. Adcomms won't read your access claim, conclude that you would've received a 4.0 GPA without your condition, and evaluate you on that hypothetical basis -- access categories don't work like that. They'll see your already competitive 3.7/3.85 and likely assign little weight to your access claim.
  15. Relax - you have a 91.96 before drops, which is a higher score than many first-round admits have after drops. There's no need for you to worry.
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