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labr

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  1. labr

    Application for Law School for Fall 2019

    The structure of personal statements really varies according to your individual style. The goal is to show the AdCom a complete picture of who you are! Some people choose to write a narrative statement, where the opening reads more like a story or by opening with a personal anecdote. Others decide to take a more formal approach. Either is great if it reflects a positive picture of the applicant! Advice on the personal statement is extremely difficult because there isn't one *right* way to write it. I was really struggling with my personal statement, but found it easiest to start by starting. I basically typed out an incoherent stream of topics I wanted to include, and then refined that over the following weeks. It seems daunting to start an essay on why you're a good person and deserve to be admitted, but I found it was easier once I had words - any words - on the paper. Re: access documentation. If you're applying through OLSAS, you can upload documentation on the SAM page (the second page on the application)!
  2. Hello! I'm applying for Fall 2019 and just wondering about the access categories - particularly medical circumstances. I'm not sure if my experience is serious enough to apply under these categories. I had a chronic health issue between Feb 2016 - May 2017, which culminated in a week long hospital stay in April 2017. I was attending school during this time, and bounced around through a few physicians due to staffing issues. I have a pretty terrible relationship with my current physician with her decisions often exacerbating my condition. In other words, I doubt it would be beneficial to ask for documentation from her. I would, however, be able to ask for documentation from a non-physician health professional, but I'm unsure if it would be accepted. I'm still unsure if I should apply under access because I don't know if my experience warrants it. I don't want to detract from the legitimacy of other applicants' claims - many of whom certainly have a worthier reason to apply access. Edit: I forgot to note that I have referenced my health issues in my personal statement. I explained what I learned from the experience and that I still believe I can meet the demands of law school.
  3. I wrote the July LSAT at Dal and had a good experience! My room was one of the first floor classrooms (with the rolling chairs in a horseshoe) - thank goodness it wasn't the Potter haha. The desk is one long desk for multiple people and I found that the invigilators squished people a little too much (one chair between each person, which is especially awkward with the huge outlets in the middle of the desk). That said, I'm left handed and love extra room so it was probably fine for everyone else. The invigilators assign you to a seat. There were 15 other people writing. I talked to a few people who wrote the June LSAT and said there were ~20 others writing at that time. The room has air conditioning, which is great! I wrote when we were in the July heat wave, so I wore a short sleeve dress and was at a good temperature. I didn't bring a backpack with me, so I can't remember 100% but I think other people just had to put it at the front of the classroom. I kept my wallet in my clear plastic bag and didn't bring my phone to be extra safe. There were 2 invigilators, who were very friendly! They were calming and seemed like they wanted everyone to feel relaxed. They go through the instructions on how to fill out your bubble and answer sheet a little fast, but they were always happy to re-read or answer your question. The only thing that caught me off guard was the rules about what you could have on your desk. I had read the rules before, but for some reason, it didn't register that you can't have your water bottle on the table with you. You can only access it during the break (~1.5 hours into the test). I usually drank about a litre of water during my practice tests, so I was a little uncomfortable not being able to drink anything. I'm rewriting in October, and I'll be practicing without water haha. I guess the major piece of advice in general would be to really replicate the test conditions (even filling in the bubble sheet etc.). I hope this helps! I'm also the type of person who likes to know as much as possible about the setting before going in, so please let me know if you have other random questions! Good luck!
  4. labr

    Admission Advice Please on Application

    I'm also rewriting in October! Most schools (although you should double check) will accept LSAT scores up to January write, so you definitely have a few test dates for 2019 entry.
  5. I first posted this accidentally in the LSAT forum instead of this one... Sorry for the duplication! -- Hi! I wrote the July LSAT and wasn't happy with my score (160). It was my first write, so I'm registered to write the October (UK) test. I'm just wondering what score I'd need to have a good chance at Ottawa, Dal, Queens, and Western for 2019 entry. I know my GPA is not ideal. I did a difficult medical science undergrad and also had multiple serious health issues in year 2 and 3 (I doubt they would be enough for access category), which are now manageable (I've explained this in my PS). I have mediocre softs (in progress masters, executive positions on multiple societies for 2-3 years, other ECs that relate to health policy / law, good LORs). With all this considered, I'm thinking I'll need at least a 167 to compensate for my cGPA. Thoughts? Also, do schools take into account what kind of undergrad you did? My undergrad is a BSc Honours with thesis, which was mostly (now personally irrelevant) courses like physiology, pharmacology, immunology etc. . I have a 3.98 in all of my humanities / social sciences courses, but 4 particular science courses really took a toll on my cGPA. I'm not implying that schools take this as a huge factor, but I'm just curious if they consider it even minimally. Thanks all!
  6. Just realized I posted this in the wrong thread! Re-posting in Admissions! Sorry!
  7. Thanks so much! I really appreciate it!
  8. I'm also actually looking at Queen's. My B2 is about a 3.8.
  9. Hi! I wrote the July LSAT and wasn't happy with my score (160). It was my first write, so I'm registered to write the October (UK) test. I'm just wondering what score I'd need to have a good chance at Ottawa, Dal & Western for 2019 entry. I know my GPA is not ideal. I did a difficult medical science undergrad and also had multiple serious health issues in year 2 and 3 (I doubt they would be enough for access category), which are now manageable (I've explained this in my PS). I have mediocre softs (in progress masters, executive positions on multiple societies for 2-3 years, other ECs that relate to health policy / law, good LORs). With all this considered, I'm thinking I'll need at least a 167 to compensate for my cGPA. Thoughts? Also, do schools take into account what kind of undergrad you did? My undergrad is a BSc Honours with thesis, which was mostly (now personally irrelevant) courses like physiology, pharmacology, immunology etc. . I have a 3.98 in all of my humanities / social sciences courses, but 4 particular science courses really took a toll on my cGPA. I'm not implying that schools take this as a huge factor, but I'm just curious if they consider it even minimally. Thanks all!
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