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TdK

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  1. Prepare yourself for an onslaught!
  2. It was partially directed at you, but also others. Fair explanation regarding your workplace. I may have preached to the choir, considering you've stated there are shades of grey.
  3. On the topic of people listening to or finding some useful guidance in figures such as Jordan Peterson, I think some are being too divisive and harsh. This topic was created in LS Applicants. The poster could be 20 years old. I'm sure there are a number of beliefs I held at 20 years old that I would embarrassed by now. Point being, people will (hopefully) analyze their own ideas and beliefs and change them accordingly. Further, if you won't be friends with someone or assume you won't be able to work with them simply because they found something a speaker like Jordan Peterson said persuasive or helpful, you've got to learn to respect a difference of opinion (and honestly, I personally would think you've got your own set of issues that need addressing). Even if you vehemently disagreed with everything Peterson said, that doesn't mean you can't enjoy spending time with someone who thought his ideas were useful. A couple of years ago, I was intrigued by some of Peterson's ideas. The suggestion that someone wouldn't be able to work with me for that interest is honestly laughable. That's a terribly black and white way to view a person and entirely unhelpful to meaningful discourse about some issues our society ought to work on. It's also possible someone can find only a small portion of what an author or speaker posits as useful, and not adopt their views wholesale. I admit I don't know all of Peterson's work / opinions, but looking at a few of his rules from his new book via Wikipedia, some seem useful. Examples: Be precise in your speech, tell the truth, assume the person you're speaking to may know something you don't. Reading some of these posts, it seems that if I so much as referenced one of these "rules" and uttered the name "Jordan Peterson" I would be branded as a patriarchy-loving, extreme right wing moron. This is a lazy, dishonest, and dangerous way to view people.
  4. Nonono. UofT is the Harvard of the North-ish. Lakehead is the Harvard of the North.
  5. TdK

    Ryerson Law by 2020 - Letter of Intent

    I'm somewhat torn on this issue. I think you're right insofar as there are likely students from every school that can't properly carry out a number of tasks entrusted to lawyers. At the same time, are there a greater number of students graduating from schools that accept less competitive candidates (compared to UofT or McGill, for example) who end up being unqualified and belong to the group of people we might not trust a file to? I tend to think yes. It seems students with less competitive admissions stats are either less intelligent or less dedicated / hard-working. As a result, they will tend to become less than stellar lawyers. I don't think we've dropped below that bar yet, and I'm not even certain the correlation between less competitive law school applicants turning into incompetent lawyers exists. But we certainly don't want to start down a path that leads us to the abysmal state of legal education in the United States, and it seems the only way down that road is opening up more law schools when there isn't a need for them. I wish I could express this idea more intelligibly, but alas I am exhausted. Or perhaps I belong in the unfortunate category of incompetent students we reference.
  6. TdK

    Ryerson Law by 2020 - Letter of Intent

    This was a needlessly aggressive post.
  7. TdK

    Still no articling job.

    There are a large number of students that aren't particularly interested in one area / are unsure what to do in third year. Those that say they do often completely flip over the next five years. Not saying it's ideal, but I don't think it's something to worry about. I'd worry about people in my shoes who had an interest in insurance defence (as they clearly lack a soul).
  8. Oh man, this thread is pure gold. For anyone reading who's genuinely curious as to whether they can pursue a hobby while in law school - of course you can. I can assure you there are plenty of students who finish top of their class who put in maybe 40 hours a week. People who claim they don't have any time to spare are delusional. Or perhaps they belong to a particularly devout group of law-loving masochists.
  9. TdK

    Articling Salary

    Forced an audible chuckle out of me.
  10. TdK

    Suits For Men

    Username checks out. I'd echo @FineCanadianFXs's advice: with a $300 budget, it's going to be difficult to get something that looks and feels good. Tip-Top carries DKNY - not the greatest suit brand but if you're willing to spend an extra ~$50 bucks, their suits are made to fit skinnier guys like you and I. To be honest, I've gotten more compliments on that damn suit than others I've purchased at more than double the price. https://www.tiptoptailors.ca/en/modern-fit-100-wool-notch-lapel-window-check-suit-p73584/
  11. TdK

    The Sartorial Canon

    They're so ugly, they're cute - like those dogs with no fur and a long snout.
  12. TdK

    Rural lawyering pay

    @lioness My comment was not intended towards you at all. My bad if it came off that way.
  13. TdK

    Rural lawyering pay

    Sincere apologies if you're talking about tiny towns much smaller than some place like Thunder Bay, but dear god, your comment is the reason northerners view those of us from the city as elitist snobs. I imagine this comment coming from someone holding a tiny dog wearing a bow in its hair as they sip some golden bean, peach infused, wheat-grass bullshit to "reinvigorate." Also my bad if your comment is poking fun at that culture.
  14. TdK

    Is TRU a reputable Law School

    I think it's fair to say top students with top LSAT scores will likely do best in law school. I don't think that always translates into practice. For example, becoming a wildly successful personal injury lawyer has less to do with one's genius legal ability than it does with being a business conscious, hardworking and likable person (yes, I know you can't be a total numb-skull and still be a successful P.I lawyer). There are plenty of B- law students who have much greater success in practice than those at the top. Some people don't care to work hard in school, but when they've got a client they turn on the jets. Some people who are gifted academically have a difficult time doing the more mundane work of lawyering that clients nonetheless demand. All that being said, I would imagine that on average top students are more successful lawyers than their less academically successful counterparts. I guess we have to ask what being "successful" in law means.
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