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whereverjustice

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whereverjustice last won the day on August 18

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  1. This is an automated response to a topic that appears to be requesting legal advice. Please refer to the following post regarding such requests:
  2. I think you should cancel and retake. No one will care about seeing a cancelled score, and even if they did, a 154 does you no favours given your preferences. Go for that 160.
  3. When you transfer out, you need to have a clear explanation for your decision and ambitions to avoid looking like some aimless nomad who won't commit to the program. So when you apply to other schools, make sure you are very clear that with your 1L pedigree you expect to stand out from your classmates; that your admission at UofT and your experiences there will make you a top candidate for leadership in the student body given the higher admissions standards and superior instruction. I'd suggest you attach a copy of the Maclean's ranking, and maybe print out copies of the recent lawstudents.ca Accepted threads from both schools. You should also send these, along with a copy of your transfer application, to the ECs you might want to run next year such as student newspapers, law journal, clinics, etc.
  4. Yes, you can get into a Canadian JD program with good grades from a Dutch university. You don't even need Canadian work experience. Your main obstacle is likely to be getting a visa (or permanent residency).
  5. This is an automated response to a topic that appears to be requesting legal advice. Please refer to the following post regarding such requests:
  6. Volunteering experience is fine. You don't have to hold a paid job. Really you don't even need volunteer experience, though it can be helpful in showing you to be a well-rounded person and giving your personal statement a bit of a boost.
  7. I don't want students to talk to me about my social life because then I have to pretend I have a social life. Or like, "oh, have you been watching game of thrones" and I'm just "no lately it's been all Noddy, Toyland Detective". I definitely don't want to talk about my practice with articling students at social events. It reinforces the hierarchical aspect of the relationship which social events are, ideally, supposed to erode a bit. Also I resent the idea that my work is the most interesting thing about me, especially because that is true. Honestly my preferred conversation topic is for articling students to talk about unique or interesting experiences they have had, e.g. past jobs/volunteering or travel. I've said this before, but just in case some are inclined to take this seriously, bear in mind that Hoy had a lot of friends who are still in the profession and who don't find his death to be especially hilarious.
  8. This may be helpful: https://www.lawsociety.bc.ca/Website/media/Shared/docs/forms/MS-admissions/transfer-info.pdf
  9. This is an automated response to a topic that appears to be requesting legal advice. Please refer to the following post regarding such requests:
  10. The Call experience in Toronto is a lot like a university convocation. Some people might cry, sure, but it's a regimented celebration.
  11. I agree with @adVenture. You should definitely try to make contact with someone in the office to get insight on the work they do. They may also have some sense of what will be in the interviews. I know it's awkward to cold-call. I'd suggest you try to identify one or two recent calls (1-4 years), or alumni of your law school, and reach out to them. Names and e-mail addresses will be in Info-go; browse by organization - go to Ministries and then Attorney General, or to the client ministry (e.g. Labour) and then find the Legal Services Branch which is usually listed as part of the Deputy Minister's Office. LinkedIn can help too. You can also just pick a lawyer at random, tell them you're interviewing in their branch and ask if there's someone who's designated as the contact to talk about this kind of thing. Even if there's no one formally identified, they should have a sense of who might be willing.
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