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TooYoung

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  1. Hey. I worked full time while self-studying. No tutor. I used PowerScore. PowerScore has a number of schedules, depending on how much time until your test (e.g., 1 mo, 3 mos, etc.). They also have something on their site where you enter your answers from practice tests, and it’ll tell you which kinds of questions you’re struggling with. At first, I followed the schedule to get a sense of the LSAT. I then would do at least one practice test/weekend and adjust my studying accordingly to where I was struggling. Of course, certain types of questions are more intuitive than others, so I didn’t want to waste time studying concepts I understood. I didn’t take any time off to study. Studied textbooks after work, and practice test(s) during the weekend. I took a total of three days off: two days before the test and obviously one on test day. On my first day off, I took one last practice test. Scored the lowest of any of my prep tests. That did not help my anxiety going in — I recommend you don’t make that same mistake.
  2. I look forward to finding out which is greater: 5% of ls.ca's global revenue or $25m. (see: s.125(a))
  3. Just be happy yours became inaccurate in a day, instead of one that has slowly been transitioning from being accurate to being a joke.
  4. I keep finding myself focusing on the literal text, rather than why I'm reading a particular case. Wrapping my head around the reasoning behind having a self-service pharmacy was more difficult than the issues re: offer/acceptance. Yes, they were technically over the counter drugs. But they also contained codeine. If my elementary school Lil Wayne phase taught me anything, that can be some serious stuff! What really felt crazy was the signup for Student Legal Services. I feel like the average person who's frequently at odds with the law knows more about criminal law than I do. I know I can only deal with relatively minor matters and have proper supervision, but still!
  5. Damn I love this website. Thanks so much for the insights everyone!
  6. Would you mind elaborating on that portion, if you have the time? I’m curious how that plays out more specifically.
  7. Thanks for sharing your insights! I suppose, as I'm starting to learn, the answer is usually "it depends". As a follow up to the above: do you have any insights into how a law student could dip their toes into this world to see if it's the right fit? Summer jobs are the most obvious answer, but would you recommend any classes that I should take, for example?
  8. Hello, I've been researching different career trajectories that my JD can take me. I have come across several firms' government relations practices. This seems to be interesting work but based on LinkedIn creeping of partners/associates, I can't seem to figure out what sort of path is required to get in to that world. Would any of you have any insights into: What a law practice in that circle entails (e.g., Would you solely be handling legal issues? Is there some mix lobbying/communications/law?) What kind of experience is required to get in to that world (e.g., should one get involved in politics? Is it just an organic transition into that world as you become more experienced in a firm?) Any insights are much appreciated!
  9. If only my parents understood my gaming as "getting shit done" when I was growing up. I would have gotten out of a lot of chores.
  10. At least I know where I'm going now... CGPA: 2.8 L2: 3.7 LSAT: 159 (Jan 2020)
  11. Old people assuming that the world that was is the world that is.
  12. If I cared enough, I'd take the time to point out how many ridiculous points you made. Instead I'll leave it at this: why should anyone take your (i.e., someone who has admittedly never practiced) advice over the other posters above who have practiced? I know whose opinions I'd value more. But I'm just a youngster with a degree with inflated grades, whose degree was tarnished by all those damned SJWs, and is also worthless, as everyone appears to know.
  13. From the email I received today: "We can confirm that all first-year courses will be online for the Fall semester (September to December 2020)."
  14. While I don't have lots of advice to give, I just want to say that getting in to law school is definitely still possible for you. I was in a similar boat and have gotten accepted. Career options without law school: Government. They more or less have a monopoly on many of the things you will have studied (e.g., police forces, prisons, etc.). Great pay, great benefits, etc. Additionally, for some reason, I have also met a lot of people in corporate HR with crim backgrounds. I don't know why but this might be something to look in to. Grades: Personally, my years 1-3 were bad. I worked hard in my fourth year and took a fifth year (i.e., you might want to consider taking two additional semesters) under open studies. That netted me 2.8 GPA and 3.7 L2. I then applied to schools that focus on your L2 (e.g., UCalgary, UAlberta, TRU, Western, Queen's, etc.). They all have somewhat different processes at looking at grades so consult the schools' websites. LSAT: I don't have much advice on this other than the obvious fact that you should strive to do as well as you possibly can. Of course, the lower your L2, the stronger you want to be on this front. Feel free to PM me if you want some insights on the non-law government route. I too have a background in crim and have had some fun jobs with the govt.
  15. Rejected today. Still no email/update in OLSAS. CGPA: 2.8 L2: 3.7 LSAT: 159 (Jan 2020)
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