Jump to content

PureComedy88

Members
  • Content Count

    47
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Community Reputation

47 Decent People

About PureComedy88

  • Rank

Recent Profile Visitors

The recent visitors block is disabled and is not being shown to other users.

  1. E-mail this story to your MPP That is terrifying
  2. Did you run the calculator for 2019? On the website it says it is not available yet, and for obvious reasons. I'd like more details about how this move is going to affect mature / older students. I'm 30 and am in no way dependent on my parents (both are now retired). When I ran the calculator for 2018 last year I was eligible for $15K in OSAP, only around half of which I would have to pay back. I'm wondering how worse off I am going to be as a result. It's great that it sounds like the tuition reduction will apply to law students. Overall, this is a terrible policy and going to harm many students. However, I also think the Liberals should have just cut tuition and actually made colleges and universities commit to free tuition for those in households earning under $50k per year instead of this obscure grant OSAP-based funding model. It would have made it much harder for the Ford Cons to roll back.
  3. The majority of Ontarians did not vote them in
  4. The fact that you are not receiving free tuition means it's not free, plain and simple We're talking about students
  5. You are making an assumption though about the source of funding based on something that happened in relation to your roommate. Do you have any other evidence or is there other info out there? Regardless, it's my understanding that it isn't actually free tuition because it is a series of grants that are given to individuals based on means and can be affected by things such as the level of savings they have in their bank account. Only if you meet a certain number of conditions (i.e. so many years out of school, your parents make under a certain amount of money per year) do you actually get 'free tuition' and even then it's provided through OSAP. Free tuition would literally mean free tuition, as in no OSAP, no means testing, nothing like that....
  6. That sucks! What would you like to see the government do? I'm also curious about the exact change that resulted in your funding being cut between your second / third year and how it was related to the most recent changes. As we all know, the 'free tuition' thing was a hoax, especially if one group of students is receiving extra support at the expense of another. They shouldn't be assuming that people from 'high' income households (also, don't mean that literally) all have parents who are willing to assist them with tuition and living expenses. I should note that I'm 30 and haven't been in school for 7 years so kind of drifted away from following student politics and am no expert regarding the ins and outs of OSAP. I was also privileged enough to never have to apply for OSAP until now because my parents helped pay for my undergrad tuition (although we are far from rich), but I did work throughout my undergrad and master's programs to afford rent and living expenses.
  7. I am very concerned about what this could mean for law students, especially since I am one entering first year next September at U of Ottawa. All this government has done is slash programs and give handouts to business. I wouldn't be surprised if they announced that they are reversing all changes made to OSAP under the Liberals. Even those changes were inadequate considering the level of student debt in this province, but they were still a major help and far better than nothing at all. Like many, I will be requiring the assistance of OSAP for the next three years. In 2018, I was projected to receive the maximum amount (around $15-16K) and only required to pay back half of it. If they reverse the changes made to OSAP, without lowering tuition for professional degrees, this government 'for the people' may result in me, and many others starting law school next year, accumulating up to an additional $20k in student debt over the next three years of legal studies. That is atrocious.
  8. Wow, what a jump in LSAT scores! Congratulations! That's so impressive, seriously. I'm sure some law schools in your area would accept you. However, you need to make sure your personal statement is very well written and provides not only a succinct overview of your life and work experiences, but also your motivations for wanting to pursue a legal career at this age. Also make sure that you explain the reasons for why your GPA is on the lower side.
  9. You should be encouraged because I learned I received an offer from U of Ottawa literally minutes after making this post!! I have two years of experience as a social worker in a low income community and two years of experience as a researcher working under a university professor studying the experiences of immigrant injured workers. I am submitting a publication for peer review sometime next year. How about you? I still haven't heard back from Windsor or any of the other schools I applied to (Western and Queen's)... Did you apply anywhere else?
  10. Accepted today - no e-mail but status changed on ozone and I have my PDF in front of me as proof LSAT 156 cGPA 3.1 and L2 3.3 Older student with an MA and tons of work experience I have been working at this for two years (studying LSAT and applying). I was rejected in 2017, waitlisted in June of this year and am now finally accepted. I'm on the verge of tears right now...
  11. Nvm, was just accepted. Merry Christmas folks!
  12. Older applicant, MA degree, extensive professional work experience in the social services and as a researcher, very focused and clear personal statement and fantastic academic and professional references...
  13. Older applicant, MA degree, extensive professional work experience in the social services and as a researcher, very focused and clear personal statement and fantastic academic and professional references...
×
×
  • Create New...