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Lawstudent95

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  1. Hi everyone, I'm currently doing my undergraduate degree in a co-op program and am considering applying to law school. I was reading the U of T Law School Admissions website and came across this: Our review of an applicant's undergraduate record is based on the principle that undergraduate records should be compared as fairly as possible across applicants. For this reason, we examine the pattern of the intensity of the course work taken across an applicant's undergraduate career (light versus heavy, full-time versus part-time, co-op versus regular, introductory versus upper-year courses, courses on exchange, courses during the summer term). I have a couple questions about this: 1. What is the reasoning for differentiating between regular and co-op programs? Does this mean students in co-op programs are at an inherent disadvantage in admissions? 2. Regarding summer courses, I assume U of T looks at them differently because they are sometimes accelerated or easier than those during the fall and winter terms. Because I am in a co-op program, I am forced to do a summer term with a full course load. These courses are the same length and difficulty as the rest of my courses. Will U of T put less weight on my grades in these courses simply because they are "courses during the summer term"? If anyone has any information that can help answer these questions that would be a huge help for me. Thanks in advance.
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