Jump to content

LivePumpkin

Members
  • Content Count

    214
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Everything posted by LivePumpkin

  1. Agreed. LSAT Trainer was probably the best book I used.
  2. Hey, don’t feel discouraged. The other users have given good advice here. And like some have said, you did write two A exams. Try reflecting on the year. Did you notice any differences between the classes you got an A / C in? How did you study for the classes you got an A in vs. the classes you got a C in? How did you build summaries for the two? Also, did you visit professors for feedback on exams? Different courses/professors have different methods of evaluating, so I think trying to figure out the professor matters a lot.
  3. I think you should let the school know that you might not be able to make it to the first day of orientation. I know people who did that and they were fine!
  4. @harveyspecter993 "B and B+ students were hired in the 1L recruit." ^ That's interesting. Everyone I know of had an A average.
  5. Pursue extracurriculars in areas that you are interested in. For example, if you’re interested in business law, seek out opportunities that will give you exposure in those areas (e.g., business clinics or various corporate oriented groups at your school). In my experience and opinion, pursue extracurriculars/clinics/clubs with a quality over quantity mindset. I also think employers see the type of extracurriculars you are involved in as being indicative of your interest in that area. The 1L clinics I was involved in were minimal commitment, which allowed me to spend most of my time focusing on readings and lectures. On the other hand, I also know that some of my peers did not like the minimal commitment since they didn’t learn as much as they wanted to. I believe balancing extracurriculars with exam preparation comes down to your ability to manage your time well. Try your best not to procrastinate (such as keeping up with lectures and readings) and you should be fine. Considering that it may take time to adjust to 1L itself, I’d recommend pursuing 2 clinics/clubs/extracurriculars max. Obviously the choice is yours but I found that worked out pretty well for many people I know in 1L. I hope this helps!
  6. I think this depends on the clinic/intensive. All of the business clinics/intensives are very competitive (e.g., Osgoode Business Clinic and the Advanced Business Law Workshops). I am not familiar with the Crim clinics/intensives but I know that CLASP/PBSC were competitive in 1L (especially in first semester). A lot of people did not get an offer from CLASP in the Fall semester but did get an offer in the Winter semester. In the end, I think most people end up with something. For clinics in first semester, your resume and specific clinic application will determine whether you get an offer or not. In second semester, your first semester grades will also be added to that mix. For example, if you are applying to the Advanced Business Law Workshops in the second semester of 1L, your first semester grades will play a huge role in determining whether or not you get the workshops. Hope that helps! I'd also add that these comments are based on my experiences. Someone please correct me if I am wrong!
  7. I found this from last year @FoG!
  8. I'd suggest focusing on one section at a time (start with LG, then do LR, and finish off with RC). Also, for LG you might want to check out 7Sage. Their fool proofing videos were pretty helpful when I prepared. Also, try your best not to burn out. Put in as many hours as you think you can do. However, if you start to notice that you are burning out or getting frustrated with the material, then just take a break. If you are in school, I would try aiming for anywhere from 1-3 PTs per week. Just make sure you review them all thoroughly!
  9. If you are in school, I would recommend studying one section at a time. Try LG > LR > RC. 7Sage foolproofing videos for LG / LSAT Trainer for LR / RC
  10. Try studying one section at a time? LG > LR > RC. Focus on foolproofing the games first with 7Sage videos and then try The LSAT Trainer or Manhattan for LR/RC. After each test/section, spend a lot of time reviewing your mistakes and even consider writing them down somewhere to look back to for a quick review. Study from PT 52 and up as they will be closer to what you will expect on test day
  11. Try studying one section at a time? LG > LR > RC. Focus on foolproofing the games first with 7Sage videos and then try The LSAT Trainer or Manhattan for LR/RC. After each test/section, spend a lot of time reviewing your mistakes and even consider writing them down somewhere to look back to for a quick review.
  12. Also, I'd recommend using PT 52 and up since their questions will be fairly similar to what you will see on test day
  13. Try THE LSAT Trainer or Manhattan for LR / RC. Try 7Sage for LG. They have free videos on YouTube on fool proofing! Also, I'd recommend taking your time. Really try to understand your mistakes after every PT so you can avoid them in the future.
  14. I agree with this. 7Sage is one of the best resources out there!
  15. In addition to what has already been said, take the test when you start consistently scoring around your target score!
  16. There are many success stories all over different LSAT forums (like LSAT Reddit and 7Sage forums). You could try studying with others, that could help motivate you. I studied alone as well so I know how it feels. Let me know if you need any help!
  17. Like others have said, I do not think they will care. Just try your best to do well in them!
  18. I tried both PowerScore and The LSAT Trainer. I found the LSAT Trainer to be a much better resource. Check it out. Last time I checked, the author even had free sample chapters on his website
  19. Study LG, LR and RC in that order. For LG try 7Sage's Foolproofing method (the videos are free on YouTube). For LR and RC try The LSAT Trainer.
  20. I'd recommend studying from the PT that introduced comparative passages and going from there. I forgot which one it was but I am pretty sure it was in the 50s. The newer LSAT tests will be similar to what you will encounter on test day!
  21. 3-4 months of very intense studying all day. I forgot the hours, lol. Like others have said, however, studying for the LSAT will be personalized to you. You might learn the material faster or slower than others. I'd recommend studying LG, LR and RC in that order. For LG try 7Sage's foolproofing videos. For LR and RC try The LSAT Trainer! Good luck!
  22. Echoing @BlockedQuebecois - Do you have any questions/concerns about time spent early on in the Reserves before becoming a Legal Officer (e.g., completing basic military qualification training)?
×
×
  • Create New...