Jump to content

Mountebank

Members
  • Content Count

    1219
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    3

Mountebank last won the day on December 12 2019

Mountebank had the most liked content!

Community Reputation

1485 Good People

About Mountebank

  • Rank

Recent Profile Visitors

2440 profile views
  1. Well, I don't know. But based on the amount of times I've spoken those or similar words into the mirror, lawyer1987 appears to be my inner monologue.
  2. I've been grappling with this lately (from a fees perspective, as well) as I have a couple non-resident clients. For one of the matters, I'm sure it's zero-rated. For the other, it's an Estate admin file with real and tangible personal property in Canada. My perspective is that this matter is an exemption to the zero-rated rule given that my services directly relate to counting, valuing, protecting and preserving, and ultimately conveying the various real and tangible assets and, therefore, I should keep charging HST (I know my old firm just charged HST on everyone and everything, but I'd like to be a bit more precise and save my clients a few bucks if I can). Can @Skweemish or anyone else point me to some additional resources to help me with this? Or maybe I'm just overthinking this.
  3. It isn't rude to ask for letters of reference and giving those letters is a fact of life for professors and employers. The applicant is one in a sea of applicants, whom the employer does not know, asking the employer for a gig. For any student applicants reading this thread, you can certainly go ahead and not provide reference letters if it offends your sensibilities, but know you risk permitting amenable applicants to distinguish themselves at your expense. There are, after all, fewer legal jobs than there are applicants and although the supply/demand reality may change in favour of applicants some time in future, it will be too late for you when it does.
  4. Throwing my vote in for effectively no one caring about OP's undergrad if he gets a Canadian JD.
  5. @Uriel is up to his asshole in babies, if that clarifies things.
  6. Further to the above posts, I know a couple sole practitioners (one generalist and one volume real estate) who net mid-six figures in small population centres. I don't know how common this is, as we're mostly pretty tight-lipped about our finances, but still...
  7. The same as it ever was. Whichever law allows you to buy a few apartment buildings asap and get the feck outta law.
  8. Patently false. Criminal lawyers rarely use the shower at all.
  9. Seriously. You guys have me rolling over here!!!
  10. ...work? Ha. Hahaha. AAGGGAHAAAAAAHAAAHAAAAAAHAHAHAHAAAAAA!!!
  11. I didn't merge a single PDF before my call. Now I do it all the time, so YMMV.
  12. Yes, least of all the taxpayers.
  13. Echo small town practice for flexibility (35 hours isn't the norm, but I suppose it could be if you actually don't want more than $50k/year).
  14. Is whole foods considered...expensive? It's still buying food to make yourself, like you're a janitor or a teacher or something. To the OP, I had understood from friends of mine that as far as bigger firms go, the dramatic pay difference in Vancouver is most keenly felt during articles and that the gap narrows at least somewhat post-call as you go along. But that's not from personal experience so surely someone more informed, smarter, and maybe even handsomer can comment.
×
×
  • Create New...