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BlockedQuebecois

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Everything posted by BlockedQuebecois

  1. My favorite thing about Osgoode thus far has been the people. I've found my peers to be incredibly supportive and the upper years go above and beyond to make sure we're getting along well. Similarly, professors are supportive and astonishingly supportive, and I've found most of them to be lovely people as well. Something you may not be used to if you're a K-JD without any work experience with academics is how they really start to treat you like an actual human being. There's still a clear power dynamic, but they'll tell you about their day, ask you about yours, and mention if there are any cool bands coming to town this weekend. The worst thing about Osgoode is the location. North York sucks. Nearly every major off-campus event will take place downtown, which up until now with the subway involved a bus ride and subway downtown, plus possibly an additional bus ride once down there. With the subway opening up the commute to and from Osgoode will be nicer, but you're still looking at a good 40 minutes to an hour if you want to go to school here and live somewhere livable.
  2. 1) No, I don't, but most of my friends do and I spend a lot of time there. The apartments that open to the outside are serviceable — they're nice a big, you get a fair bit of light, and it feels like you live in a townhouse. The ones that open to the inside I find depressing. The hallways are bleak, the carpet is worn, you can hear everyone talking through their paper-thin doors, and it smells awful. They also tend to be significantly smaller (and all the outside apartments have an area when you first step with a second closet to hang your coat and put your muddy shoes. The equipment inside each is the same, with your standard dorm-level furnishings. The desks have built-in fluorescent lighting, which I like when I'm studying at someone's place. I've heard the beds are uncomfortable, and that you should budget for a mattress topper if you choose to live there. Oh, and the walls are thin! 2) You can see all the first year course schedules online! Go to myosgoode.yorku.ca and click schedules and timetables (no login required). You'll be able to see both the fall and winter schedules for each section In general, I was in class from 10:30 to 4:30 most days in the fall, while some of my peers were in class from 8:30 to 2:30. There was usually at least an hour break in between classes. This winter I'm usually out earlier, 12:30 some days, 2:30 others. 3) I had a discussion with someone about this today actually! I vastly prefer the semestered course system. Things are definitely tight and your profs will likely pick up the pace come November, but overall I think the benefit of not having to juggle 8 classes worth of readings for an entire year is worth the tradeoff of reading one topic more quickly 4) My undergraduate was in biochemistry, which meant I was used to memorizing significant amounts of information and thinking through problems logically. Those techniques translated quite well to 1L. What I struggled with was reading. My undergraduate was very hands-on, and I rarely had to read more than 10 pages per class (for most of my undergrad I never read, period). Shifting from that to reading 30-40 pages per class was a big adjustment. It took until November for me to really get a grip on how I wanted to brief cases, how deeply I had to read, and what parts of cases I could scan over.
  3. Hey all, ZineZ made one of these last year, and Ryn made one two years ago, so I figured as this year's active Osgoode 1L I'd offer to answer any questions you may have. Someone else tried to start one a few weeks ago, but since they weren't a 1L and were simply requesting one it didn't garner much attention I'm happy to answer any questions you have about Osgoode generally, how I study specifically, living on campus, or anything else. As a student from out-of-province, I also have a bit of a unique perspective in terms of moving across the country for law school, so I'm happy to speak to those as well! Please don't ask me about tuition, it will make me sad (but you can ask me about bursaries, etc). Just a disclaimer: we've got 1L job and 2L clinical applications due on Wednesday to go along with a 50% paper due on Monday, so I may take a while to respond until then. I'll try to read through and respond at least once a day though (and the benefit of me starting the thread instead of responding in the request thread is I'll get notifications instead of having to read this forum, which I rarely do ). If you have any questions you feel are too personal, feel free to PM me. If you PM me a question and I think the information would be of general use, I'll strip my response of any identifying information and post it here.
  4. If that's the case, it's terrible planning to use a huge outlier as your basis for making a $100,000+ investment.
  5. Their website: https://www.law.utoronto.ca/student-life/career-development-office/career-statistics
  6. I also don't know where they're getting 11% from. From 2012 to 2016 they averaged 4.9%.
  7. I agree with Luckycharm, I would forward it to the dean. Alternatively, you can reach out to either of the two admins for that group — they're both student government members and in close contact with the faculty. @Nabbo , you may want to consider editing your post in case it violates any forum rules against doxxing.
  8. People are fully entitled to want a career that pays well and provides financial stability. At the same time, other people are fully entitled to dislike people who want to spend their social, political, and educational capital in pursuit of making money instead of in pursuit of "social justice." Both views are fair.
  9. What would your family reference accomplish, besides bring the appearance of nepotism to your application?
  10. I actually think the firm in the third paragraph what being charitable. There's no way I would pay $15,000 to somebody that doesn't realize until after "building a successful practice" that there is an inequality of bargaining power between employers and students. Win all the prizes you want, if you're that dull I wouldn't expect a job.
  11. The overall articling (not including clerkship) rate in Ontario was ~85% in 2012, though that number didn't account for graduates that found articles after March (http://www.lawsocietygazette.ca/wp-content/uploads/2012/10/ArticlingTaskForcefinalreport.pdf). Most of that is concentrated in certain law schools. These schools in Ontario all list >90% articling+clerkship rates: U of T, Queens, and Western. I don't think Osgoode does, but they sent me their report when I emailed them last year and it was well above that mark as well. It's also worth remembering that 1 or 2% of each class will go into another field or academia instead of being called.
  12. For any Canadians debating this path, articling rates from most law schools are greater than 90%.
  13. I think I'd prefer people with such usernames bust, but to each their own. There's a reason such an obvious name went unselected until 2017 on this board.
  14. Osgoode won't tell you what any possible bursary award would be. They will, at most, tell you that your financial statement suggests you would be eligible from a bursary ranging from $1,500 to $10,000.
  15. The obvious problem here is that you're comparing an honours level course in a political science degree to a first-year engineering course. Regardless, I'd take the engineer in this bet every day of the week and twice on sundays.
  16. "unreal" seems like a bit too high a praise. OP has a GPA 0.15 above the lower bound Osgoode lists for successful applicants, and an LSAT 3 points lower (and importantly, a full 10 percentile points worse). It probably averages out, but still, I wouldn't want to be relying on my scores averaging out to the minimums listed.
  17. No, it's pro-rated. I think they'll also let you move out on whatever day of the month too. I'm not sure how early they would let you move in, but May would probably be a weird time to live there. It's dead here in the summer (even just the week before York starts but after Osgoode has), and you likely wouldn't have any friends yet. Assuming there's no reason to live in North York at that point, I'd almost recommend renting one of the U of T dorms during the summer so you can experience the city a bit more: https://www.studentlife.utoronto.ca/hs/summer
  18. We should really just make a robot that scans posts for *insert noun* law, and then posts "Any corporate/criminal/environmental/international/human rights law you will do is probably not what you're thinking of." It would be a big time saver.
  19. Yeah, long story short was that the Obama administration created incentives to create electronic healthcare records, with the assumption that medical professionals would obviously share these once they existed. Instead, everyone created their own electronic records to get the incentive but refused to share them, because there was no reason nor (free) system to do so. It's actually one of the few places ex-Obama officials will openly admit they messed up (this criticism isn't aimed at Obama officials in particular, just pointing out how rare it is for politicians and political operatives to admit that their policies outright failed).
  20. The good news is electronic healthcare record sharing in the US is also abysmal and was a huge waste of money by the Obama administration.
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