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BlockedQuebecois

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BlockedQuebecois last won the day on April 27

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  1. You can get nice dress shirts in that range. Particularly if you have time and can wait until sales (Bay Days in particular).
  2. My ex-girlfriends would certainly agree with you
  3. I love when people find out that money is fungible.
  4. You can always talk to students who summered with a firm. There's never a ban on it.
  5. Disagree. The proper way to wear a two button suit is with the top button done up when standing and undone when sitting. When someone departs from that standard, it's noticeable (particularly if they sit with the button done up). It doesn't truly matter, but in the context of trying to look like you know how to wear a suit, it's best to just follow the damn rules.
  6. If they don’t get drinks, politely excuse yourself and find a different firm dinner to crash.
  7. Where have you even heard that? That’s absurd advice.
  8. That story, much like every other good story, has been greatly exaggerated.
  9. Students aren’t registered in 3L courses by the time they’re submitting upper year course lists. Hell, for the 1L recruit there isn’t even a list of courses being offered the next year. And I would argue that listing a course you intend to drop is more dishonest than listing the course you intend to take, even if you’re currently registered in the first one. Listing a clinic is (probably) statistically unlikely to be honest, but that doesn’t mean people shouldn’t list them if they intend to apply and take the clinic if offered a position. There are lots of “honest” answers to what courses someone intends to take a year and a half from now. Pretending there’s no degrees of honesty in the question is silly.
  10. There are degrees of honesty on this topic, though. Say a student is registered in one class for 2L second semester, and first on the wait list for another that they’ll take over the one they’re registered in. Say the same student knows the wait list has historically moved 10 spots for that particular class. What’s more honest, listing the class they’re currently registered in or the one they’ll end up taking? Similarly, say a student wants to take two course, crim pro and civ pro II, in 3L, but they’ll only have room for one. What should they do? Is it dishonest to put crim pro when applying to crim position and civ pro II when applying to others? What if the student will take whichever is more applicable to their articling experience? And that’s before you even get into the issue of competitive seminars, clinics, and moots.
  11. This is inaccurate. First, McCarthy’s is only formally confirmed to have raised salaries for their articling students, not their summers. Second, Davies hasn’t announced a salary raise yet - they’ve been at $1,850 for years. Third, Davies articling students make $1850, not their summers. When I did the recruit they were paying summers $1600 or $1650, with BJs paying $1700, I believe. Also, I think Faskens bumped their articling pay to $1800.
  12. No recruiter in the world is going to care if you change a few courses from the time you submit an application to the time you submit your final transcripts. Mine have changed radically, and certainly nobody at my firm gives a damn. I also think @wtamow‘s story about a recruiter is dumb. Students should take what they’re interested in – if you know after 1L what you want to practice and you can fill your schedule with classes that genuinely interest you, you should. That said, just be honest. If a firm isn’t going to hire you because you took Crim Pro, you probably don’t want to work at that firm. And needless to say, if you’re interested in criminal law, become a criminal lawyer. I’m watching all my 2L friends that obviously want to practice something not-big-law freak out and apply to big law firms right now. It’s sad to see, and I hope they realize their mistake before it’s too late.
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