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canuckfanatic

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canuckfanatic last won the day on July 14

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  1. You're going to have to explain (in your cover letter) why you want to article in Vancouver/BC and put the firms at ease that you're not a flight risk. Firms don't want to hire + train someone who's just going to go back to Ontario after articles. If you're from Vancouver (or somewhere in BC) then it's fairly easy to just mention that in your applications. If you have 0 ties to BC, you're going to have to be a good salesperson (or have such a stellar application that you're worth the risk). Lots of people with out-of-province degrees secure articles in Vancouver, but a vast majority of those people were from Vancouver in the first place.
  2. For sure, a couple of those Aboriginal Rights cases came out of BC and were the focus of a few lectures. I meant to suggest that the 2007 edition can be used in combination with the up-to-date required textbook and isn't necessarily detrimental.
  3. I was in 1L in 2017 so I guess we were using the 2007 edition? Constitutional law isn't a particularly agile area of law... Compare the cases in your syllabus to an older CAN on the CAN Bank to see if there's any difference. If not, just get the older/cheaper one.
  4. You'll want to read that offer letter carefully, and may need to have a lawyer look at it. Nobody on this forum can provide legal advice.
  5. I would go through with OCIs and take an offer if you get one. If you get a job offer from OCIs you'd still be able to give your previous firm a few months' notice, it's not like you're leaving them high and dry. Did you sign anything committing to your 1L firm for next summer? Are they contributing to your tuition/textbook costs in any way? If the answer is no, then there's not reallllly any obligation to stay. The other consideration is how well known/well liked the firm is, and whether burning that bridge would come back to bite you somehow.
  6. My diagnostic was 159. I studied using PowerScore for about 2 months and got a 164 on the real thing. Then I figured I'd try writing it again just to see if I could do any better. Because I already had a good score in my pocket, I didn't have motivation to study much the 2nd time around (9 months later) and scored 160. I will always remember that 2nd LSAT attempt though because just a few days prior was my first time trying the devil's lettuce.
  7. I went to UBC for undergrad and it's such a beautiful campus. I honestly miss it.
  8. There's not enough time in the day to do all of the required readings and the optional readings. At least, not if you care about other things like sleep, exercise, friends, etc. Everyone at TRU swears by this one, it's super helpful for learning constitutional law.
  9. The average GPA and LSAT for students admitted to UBC are 3.8 and 166. You might get waitlisted?
  10. Nobody can guess you chances of getting into a Canadian law school without an LSAT score. GPA is only half of the equation (less than half for holistic schools).
  11. Copying my comment over from the previous post: Check the LSO rules re: terminating articles. In BC articles have to be mutually terminated, I don't know about Ontario. I'm inclined to also tell you to tough it out and gtfo the moment you complete your articles. If you quit, it could take you months to find a new position, you may lose all 3 months of progress you've made so far, and you might get paid less (or nothing at all). This might be a "better the devil you know than the devil you don't" situation.
  12. Check the LSO rules re: terminating articles. In BC articles have to be mutually terminated, I don't know about Ontario. I'm inclined to also tell you to tough it out and gtfo the moment you complete your articles. If you quit, it could take you months to find a new position, you may lose all 3 months of progress you've made so far, and you might get paid less (or nothing at all). This might be a "better the devil you know than the devil you don't" situation.
  13. And to think, just days before the world shut down the class was debating whether the NBA was overreacting for shutting down the season over 1 positive COVID case.
  14. I would support this. I've expressed privately that the 3rd year of law school doesn't add any value. I finished all of my required courses in the first two years and spent 3L fucking around, taking fun/interesting courses that were not going to be helpful in practice. On the flip side, a part of me wanted a 4th year to take all the courses that I didn't have the opportunity to take (some electives were only offered on alternating years).
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