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canuckfanatic

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canuckfanatic last won the day on May 17

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  1. Counter point: https://www.vancourier.com/living/vancouver-ranked-fifth-most-beautiful-city-in-the-world-1.23953567
  2. TL;DR: I think going to UBC gives you more options. Plus you can see if you like Vancouver enough to stay after graduation. For one, UBC will teach BC laws. For criminal prosecution this doesn't matter because crim is federal. Labour and employment laws will be different in BC than in Ottawa. Aboriginal law will, I assume, be a mix of provincial and federal laws. The other issue for people studying outside of their province is the inability to network in the city you want to practice. If you go to UBC, you can network in Vancouver while you're here, and network in Ottawa when you're home. If you go to UOttawa, you'll only get face-to-face interactions in Ottawa. However, it is entirely possible to network with Vancouver professionals from Ottawa. I have emailed lawyers I've never met and set up phone calls with them to network and learn about their practice. Your success rate with this depends on a few factors (mutual connections, if you went to the same school, etc.). When going through an interview process, firms might ask you why you want to work in Vancouver. They want affirmation that you intend on sticking around for a while. If you're from Ottawa and you went to UOttawa they're going to assume that you're going to move back to Ottawa at some point. If your application is equal to that of someone from Vancouver, they'll probably go for that person instead. This problem is mitigated if you go to UBC. Employers in Vancouver will see that you've already moved there, and will be less concerned about flight risk. You'll never have a problem with Ottawa employers because you're from there.
  3. Yeah this is what I meant. @NewBeee While paralegals are unregulated in BC, there are two-year paralegal training programs which would increase your chances of securing a paralegal position. https://www.bcparalegalassociation.com/cpages/home
  4. If your foreign degree becomes a problem, you could complete a bachelor's degree here in Canada. Most Canadian law schools require applicants to have completed at least 3 years out of a 4 year degree program to be eligible. Most people finish their degree completely before applying to law school, but it is possible to get into law school without finishing your bachelor's. You don't need to attend a prestigious Canadian school for your bachelor's degree, you can attend the closest/least expensive program as long it is a full four-year degree program. It is possible to work as a mediator in Canada without a Canadian law degree. You could also look into a paralegal program.
  5. Schools in Canada do not specialize in specific areas of law. Also, there are no official rankings of law schools in Canada. However, some people do view graduates of some schools more favourably than others. As long as you're a strong student, it doesn't really matter which school you graduate from. This website indicates the average LSAT score for students who have been accepted to each school (except TRU, which does not publish its admissions statistics). This gives you an idea of scores to strive for. Keep in mind that these are averages, and not minimums. You can get accepted to schools with scores lower than listed on that website. Depends on the city that the school is in. I can talk about BC. Between the three schools in BC, annual tuition is roughly as follows: TRU - $20,000 UBC - $12,000 UVic - $10,000 I assume textbook costs are roughly the same at each school (~$400-$500 depending on the courses you take). Anecdotally, in my 3rd and final year of school I spent less than $150 on textbooks. According to rentals.ca, the average rent for a 1 bedroom apartment in Vancouver is around $1,900/month, and in Victoria around $1,500/month. Average rent in Kamloops for a 1 bedroom apartment is $1,100/month. However, all three schools have on-campus student housing which is likely to be cheaper than renting off-campus. It is also significantly cheaper to live in any of the cities if you have roommates. I'm not sure if you already have plans to fund your degree, but a significant number of students take out a private loan from Canadian banks like Scotiabank, TD, RBC, etc. The loan (known as a line of credit) is usually for around $120,000 broken into 3 instalments provided to you over the course of your law degree. Interest accrues on the amount that you use, but there are no minimum payments required until a year after you graduate.
  6. TRU adopted mandatory pass/fail across the board for all 3 years, and the reasons in the comments above are why I'm glad they did it
  7. Try your best to compartmentalize. If you can, put your computer in a room that's not your bedroom. Have a dedicated office space that's for work only.
  8. You won't be able to write exams on an iPad - you need full MacOS or Windows 10, not iOS or iPadOS. You can still get an iPad if you want, there are digital versions of textbooks and you'll be reading a lot of PDFs, but you'll need something else to write exams with. Most people had Macbook Airs/Pros, I had a HP Spectre x360 that I bought in 2017 and ran flawlessly all through law school. I also recommend getting comfy headphones or earbuds that block out sound for when you study in public areas.
  9. Usually there's a lot of socializing (i.e., parties) in the first two weeks of September, but it dies down into October and for the rest of the semester as you get closer and closer to exams. Most of socializing comes in the form of things like intramural sports and club activities, which it doesn't look like will happen this fall. There will be a "TRU Law Class of 2023" Facebook group in the next couple of weeks.
  10. If you're working in BC/AB, go to U of A. I've met way more U of A students in BC than Osgoode students.
  11. Also OP, assuming you're in BC you need to complete your articles within 2 years of your start date, and since you started in 2018 it seems like your deadline is coming up. You may have to contact your law society if you aren't able to complete articles within that 2 year window.
  12. This is an urban myth at every law school. It might have happened at some point, but it's evolved into something else entirely. My experience in law school was one in which everyone was willing to share their notes with each other and help their peers understand the material. Most law schools have a database of exam notes that students voluntarily upload (for access by that school's students only). What gets drilled into your head is that the legal community is small and you're bound to encounter your classmates out in the real world after graduation. You might work with them. You might work for them. You might be on opposite sides of a trial. Be kind to each other because everyone will remember if you're not.
  13. Can't speak for @easttowest but at TRU every year there are discussions about abuse of academic accommodations. It's common at many universities in almost every faculty and have been a popular topic for op eds. The discussions are almost never productive, because virtually every proposed solution would violate laws designed to protect those with physical/psychological need for accommodations from prejudice. Further to that, it's harmful to those who need accommodations and feeds recursive thoughts like what @Pythia is experiencing. The stigma around accommodations unfairly produces feelings of shame/guilt/anxiety in those who need(ed) them. It's shameful and toxic the number of times I've overheard someone say "so and so got accommodations just to boost their GPA" or "did you notice so and so didn't write the exam at the same time as us."
  14. KFC's R&D tried to make a "larger than life" sized chicken but it proved too dangerous to contain. Turned out just to be a dinosaur.
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