Jump to content

jwms

Members
  • Content Count

    105
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    1

jwms last won the day on October 5

jwms had the most liked content!

Community Reputation

61 Decent People

About jwms

  • Rank

Recent Profile Visitors

512 profile views
  1. The few hundred upper years in your law school.
  2. I don't agree. Some firms do care, and check to see whether an applicant has attended any of their events. The members of a student committee and head of recruitment at a firm (a seven sister) told me explicitly that this mattered to them. I have no idea whether that's the norm (I suspect it's not), nor whether it matters a great deal (likely not), but I have no reason to not believe these individuals.
  3. I spent very little time both prepping for OCIs and on readings.
  4. It won't necessarily get you more OCIs, but not attending firm events may harm your chances in the interview process. That said, I wouldn't feel obliged to attend them all, especially in 1L.
  5. Typically set menu. No need to play it safe, regarding menu items. And wine will be offered -- typically before dinner and then another round when seated. It's easy to drink too much, and every dinner there are a few students who do drink too much.
  6. Why would you state that planning one's career (which is never a bad thing to plan, btw) around a niche field is a poor choice? If someone is passionate about something, and knows precisely the area that they would like to work, why would that be a bad thing? Your post implies that niche fields of law are not active areas to practice (which is in itself a contradiction; something cannot be niche will simultaneously being non-existent). I would caution against discouraging prospective law students from pursuing specific practice areas, and instead encourage having those passions while keeping an open mind, and knowing that there are multiple ways to engage those practice areas (e.g., in private practice, including full-service firms, working on environmental issues for corporations; or in public capacities where one is actually practising, or using the legal training but in non-legal roles).
  7. I'd focus on studying for the LSAT and raise that by more than a couple of points.
  8. Name-dropping lawyers you've met with for a coffee is fine and normal practice.
  9. No one does this. You're trolling or have a very bizarre view of law school and what your peers are doing. In any event, I don't think this thread is particularly helpful to you (since you're not reading/digesting what anyone's telling you), and it's certainly harmful to any prospective law student reading this misinformation, so I'm out.
  10. This makes zero sense. The 'new' grading system (which is not at all new) does not really foster any more stress or competition than any other grading scheme.
  11. The vast majority of your statements in this thread are factually wrong. Are you trolling here? If not, it's pretty embarrassing that you got an H even with this display of logic.
  12. Factually wrong. Also wrong (but related to your first incorrect statement). Profreader above explained why your absolute #s of hires are meaningless. And I don't know any students who think UofT 'dominates' Bay Street; any student who does believe this is clearly misinformed. I don't know what this point has to do with anything. Who claimed that UofT was 'worldwide prestigious'? And what does that mean? What does global prestige matter, anyway?
  13. What were your grades? Edit: I just saw you posted your grades in another thread. A few things: First, your grades are above average, so you should not be nearly as concerned/anxious as you appear to be on this forum. Second, yes, having an HH is nice, but isn't the be-all, end-all. I don't think it's at all accurate to say having 1 HH and then straight Ps is more desirable than having 5 Hs and 2 Ps. In fact, having 1 HH/straight Ps would automatically disqualify you from certain firms that have a grades cut-off, whereas 5 Hs will meet every firm's grade cut-off. Third, many, many UofT students with inferior grades land jobs at top firms every year through OCIs. Finally, your extreme anxiousness on display here + your need to repeat this across three separate threads, and to discuss leaving UofT based on misinformation (these being below avg grades/1 HH being more desirable/etc.) are the types of character traits that could emerge during the OCIs (a time that many students are anxious) and probably won't serve you well there.
×
×
  • Create New...