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Toad

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  1. Some people enjoy teaching. There is also some value in being able to say you know your area of practice enough to teach it at the local law school. In areas like family and criminal, I've noticed that some of the practitioners teaching at the school use their course as an opportunity to get to know the people who are about to enter their practice area. I haven't had any of the negative issues that you have had when it comes to courses taught by practitioners.
  2. I don't think there was anything on my report that suggested I was of particular risk either. I occasionally let a balance linger on my cards, but they were almost always below 10% utilization. No new inquiries. No late payments. No collections. I'll call when I get some time to see if they have any particular reasons listed as to why they reduced it. In the last month on this forum we have also had a person with excellent credit get rejected for a Scotia PSLOC and another person whose cards weren't going to get renewed after the expiry date (however, he later contacted someone else and they said it was a mistake). It looks like Scotia, like with most banks, are tightening credit and reviewing their exposure. We are yet to have anything that has effected a large number of people yet though. It might just come down to dumb luck as to whether their discretion effects you negatively. --- Better name for this thread would probably be "Looks like Scotiabank is beginning to reduce credit card limits" for now.
  3. Mine were both reduced about 2 hours ago by the looks of it. I only noticed because I received the credit limit approaching notice in my email. I thought my cards may have been compromised, but it was caused by the limit reductions. Credit score a hair over 700. No late payments in my 10 year credit history. No collections. Overall utilization at around 40-45% because of the line of credit. I suspect if they reduced mine, most students are vulnerable because my credit history is fairly solid.
  4. Almost certain they can do whatever they want. They could probably straight up cancel all of your accounts without notice if they wanted.
  5. I just had the limits on both my Gold Amex and Passport Visa reduced from $5,000 to $1,000. I'm currently about to enter 3L. My credit score is around 700~ and there is nothing negative on my report. It looks like banks are beginning to reduce their exposure in anticipation of the economic impacts of COVID-19. Seriously considering transferring $20,000 from my LOC into a savings account in case they decide to hit the LOC too. Anyone else have this happen yet?
  6. I suspect this year is going to a be a blood bath. Many of the 3Ls who were interviewing for articling positions around the end of the last school year had their interviews cancelled. Some people with scheduled articles had their articles delayed or cancelled. Many of these people will be applying for articling positions that come up during the school year this year. There will be more people than normal applying for any remotely desirable articling position that comes up this year. Many of the smaller firms have had their businesses devastated. Even if there is a sudden influx of business as things begin to open up, I suspect the first priority for smaller firms will be hiring back any employees they had to lay off and trying to establish a steady cash flow again. There's also still a great deal of uncertainty related to COVID-19 and the economy going around. I anticipate there will be fewer articling positions available than normal this year.
  7. Here's a link with some information about the parental income of University of Toronto law students: http://ultravires.ca/wp/wp-content/uploads/2018/03/UV-February-2018-Recruitment-Special.pdf For comparison, the 50th percentile of household incomes in Ontario is around $74,260 in 2016 Around 28% of students at U of T law have parental incomes of $200,000+ which is to the best of my knowledge in the top 2-3% of household incomes in Canada.
  8. The main reason people get rejected is because of collections or late payments. Even people with barely any credit history tend to get approved if there is nothing negative in their report. The only thing that would make sense if everything you said is accurate is that the advisor made a mistake in the application or if they are tightening up credit because of COVID-19. However, if the later was true there would probably be plenty of people on this website getting rejected. Did you use one of the advisor's from this list? They are the best people to go to if you want someone who knows what they are doing. They have assigned advisors for various professional programs for each school. https://www.scotiabank.com/ca/common/pdf/personal_banking/Scotiabank_SPSP_representative_English.pdf There have been stories on Lawstudents.ca in the past of students going to an advisor who normally doesn't deal with professional student line of credits and having them mess up their application causing them to get rejected. If you can't get Scotia to work for you for some reason, with your credit history you should have no problem getting approved from another bank.
  9. A $200,000 student LOC repaid over 15 years translates to around $1,400 per month. Unless a person is in a city with a high cost of living like Toronto or Vancouver, I'd say $200,000 in debt can be fairly manageable for a person with an income of $80,000. They would just have to live like a debtless person who had an income of $54,000. (Obviously not ideal for a person who went to law school, but they wouldn't be screwed) If a person was earning $200,000 a year, $200,000 in student LOC debt would be a joke. They'd have around $110,000 a year left after taxes and payments on their LOC. Being in a long-term relationship is pretty great when you're facing $100,000+ in debt. The $700 a month I save from splitting many of the bills will basically make my debt feel $90,000 lighter.
  10. That isn't a new policy. There was something similar on the website in 2016. I sent the admissions people a question about it back then. Here was the response: "Transferable to the UofA generally means University level courses or College courses that would transfer into a degree program. So, for example, a University transfer English course from a Community College would be recognized, however, an English as a Second Language or a Culinary course from the same College would not be recognized. As long as your courses apply to a degree they will be included." Transferable to the U of A essentially just means it can't be something like a trade course. It does not mean that the U of A has to have the exact same course. If you completed your undergrad at a Canadian university you're pretty much guaranteed that all of your courses will count.
  11. For most schools if you have above average stats it's a safe bet that you'll get accepted if you apply again next year. Even average stats are a fairly safe bet in most circumstances, it may just push you back a few months into the admission cycle if the pandemic makes the admission cycle slightly more competitive.
  12. It's hard to tell. The 2009 recession lead to a spike in LSAT takers. There are numerous stories you can find from around 2010-2011 from both Canada and the United States about schools receiving a 10-20% increase in applicants after the recession making it more difficult to get in. Below is a chart of the total LSAT's administered by year. When I was applying to U of A I read every "accepted" thread in the U of A forum. The cycles immediately after the recession were noticeably more competitive. Of course, there's no guarantee that the pandemic will cause a similar spike in applications. There are enough differences between the 2009 recession and the 2020 pandemic to make comparisons difficult.
  13. From the University of Alberta 3 minutes ago. The Faculty of Law is yet to make a specific announcement yet, but I assume one will follow in the next couple weeks now that the university has made an announcement FALL TERM 2020: MOSTLY ONLINE AND REMOTE INSTRUCTION, WITH SOME IN-PERSON LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES Every fall, we welcome thousands of students to the University of Alberta and September 2020 will be no different. What will be different is the mix of learning experiences that we offer to suit the various needs of our students. While some students may be close to campus, we also recognize that not all of our students may be able to return to campus in September. Our goal is to create robust, high-quality learning opportunities for all. In September 2020, the majority of our classes will be delivered remotely and online. However, where possible, we are committed to providing small group in-person learning and experiential learning such as labs and clinical instruction, especially in those programs where in-person instruction is essential. In cases where students cannot join activities in-person, we commit that alternate arrangements will be made so that progress in programs can continue. A quality learning environment is a safe learning environment. Yesterday, we spoke with the Office of the Chief Medical Officer of Health which has given us a much better perspective on conditions and restrictions that will likely remain in the fall. That meeting helped to inform our decision to continue with delivering the majority of instruction online, with a mix of other learning opportunities where possible. Throughout our planning, we will continue to work with the Ministry of Advanced Education and the CMO to ensure that we are meeting public health and safety guidelines. As the fall term progresses, we must be prepared to be flexible. This decision allows our community to deal with some of our current uncertainty. Students and instructors can now move forward with planning and decision making knowing the direction we’ve set.
  14. Have you heard anything about how this may effect clinical courses for 2Ls/3Ls? (courses where a portion of the course involves the student working with organizations like Legal Aid or other community organizations that provide legal assistance)?
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