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realpseudonym

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Everything posted by realpseudonym

  1. No, it isn't. But if you live in Ontario and care about the rights of accused, of parents and children involved with CAS, and of persons facing removal / deportation, please contact your MPP and tell them that you oppose cuts to LAO's certificate programs. If you live in Ontario and think homelessness is bad, that renovictions are bad, that victims of violent crime should get compensation, and that those with mental disabilities might need help at SBT hearings, please contact your MPP and tell them that you oppose deep cuts to your local Community Legal Clinic. If you think that the justice system works better when litigants are informed and represented, please call your MPP and tell them that you oppose the cuts to LAO. These cuts aren't going anywhere. But most of the people coming to this site are advocates or advocates in training. So advocate. Don't duck and wait for electoral salvation. There are a lot of cases on the docket between now and 2022.
  2. This is a great thing to do, and can be a really good learning opportunity. Just remember to be respectful and discrete when observing. This is probably obvious, but I’ve seen observers (including students and journalists) laugh when a witness is struggling to answer a question, throw their hands up in disgust when they hear a decision that they think is wrong, talk during proceedings, etc. Do the basics. If someone is having a hard time (either on the stand or not) try not to stare. Because while this is a learning opportunity for you, someone else’s life might be changing pretty drastically.
  3. If memory serves, @Bure10 went to TRU in one of the earlier years. Maybe he has some insight?
  4. I feel like I'm working really hard to derail this thread, and since this is a perfectly fine topic, I should stop. But man, I've had the exact opposite thought about family so many times. I was just talking to a supervising lawyer about this time a bunch of immigration lawyers sat around and completely misapprehended basic concepts like paternity, custody, and access. Not only did that make them poorer advocates for their clients in the context of the immigration issue they were discussing, it meant that they couldn't spot family issues and advise their clients that they might want to speak to family counsel. Family law touches so many people's lives, and on touches lots of other areas of practice. I haven't done any actual family during my articles, but it's still been kinda essential on a number of occasions. I think I've used it more than torts, civil procedure, and criminal -- all of which were mandatory. Edit: I agree about wills and estates. I don't care about wills 😊
  5. Sure, there's nothing wrong with any of that. I wasn't trying to pick on you for using the word desperate. I just mean that after reading the applicants / schools forums for several years, I almost want to go around and put a post in every single one saying: THIS PROCESS DOES NOT DEFINE YOU. YOU CAN ALL (probably) GO ON TO LEAD MEANINGFUL FULFILLING LIVES, REGARDLESS OF WHETHER YOU OBTAIN A LICENCE TO PRACTICE LAW.
  6. Ottawa. Maybe even Dal -- I bet some of my classmates would've gone to a Toronto school over Dal. Yeah, I can't say I was that desperate. I wanted to go to law school. But I understood that I was probably going to get in somewhere. And I never felt like my life would be over if I didn't get a legal education. There are lots of great ways to earn a living and if I didn't get into law school, I would've just done something else. If you feel desperate, then sure, that's your reality. But not everyone feels that way and I'm not sure it's a particularly healthy mindset.
  7. I have no idea whether the Toronto location will be sufficient to lure a stronger applicant pool. But I suspect that the end result will be that more people who would've gone the foreign route or done something else will end up in Ontario law schools. Which is great for them while they're in law school. It's less great for people looking to article in southern Ontario in 2023 - 2024.
  8. Aren't all the black letter law courses half-year? I don't know if they're doing more classtime per semester, but I'm not sure I would be comfortable learning 50% less contract and criminal law than every other Canadian grad.
  9. There’s a delightful symmetry between the username “Hopeful10101” and the statement “could be any day now”.
  10. If I were king of confessions law for a day, I would create some sort of rule that investigators must allow counsel (or maybe someone else) to be present throughout questioning, where investigators know or reasonably ought to know that the accused has a disability or mental illness, which may impair their ability to understand the nature of the questioning or produce a false confession. I understand that where the markers of reliability are absent, judges can exclude the evidence after the fact. But I think that the justice system should do more to protect the rights of the most vulnerable throughout the process. We already afford the protection to youth. I don't see why we shouldn't extend the same right to other individuals, who, as noted by the SCC in Hart, are at similarly elevated risks for giving false confessions. Alas, despite my continual monitoring, I haven't seen a single posting for a king of confessions law position (w/ requirements: not called to the bar yet, minimal experience valued).
  11. I saw someone laughing uncontrollably outside the Bay/King CIBC near Stikeman. They were clearly having a mental health crisis -- if I'd known it might've been you I would've stopped to say hello!
  12. I'll PM you what I did. Not tonight, because I want to finish some work /make lunch for tomorrow / blahblahblah-responsible-decisions (this is why people should take time off!). For ideas, pzabby's new thread should drum up something.
  13. Yeah, I’m with Providence on this one. Your question is whether you have enough experience for your legal career. I think this is looking at your gap year the wrong way. If you get in, you’ll spend the next 5, 10, 40 years accumulating experience. Your question should be: what experiences do I want before I start my legal career? Take one year off. Take more. Do something you won’t be able to do once you accumulate debt, responsibility, children etc. I don’t regret going to law school at all, but I wish I’d done a little more before I did. I hope I’m no where near the middle of my life, but Jesus, sometimes I can already feel the midlife crisis coming.
  14. As far as I could tell, this was true for my graduating class at Dal. The top students were there everyday. They also seemed sufficiently well-prepared that they could follow along, and discuss, if needed (although not all of them frequently engaged in class discussion).
  15. Sure, I agree with this completely -- I think that most choices can be exercised in different ways. My point was mostly that for me, pursuit of my own choices does not equate to judgment of others' choices. I didn't mean to make blanket statements about other peoples' choices.
  16. From my standpoint, this is a little like being a (non-infuriating) vegetarian: I can believe in something without walking around condemning everyone else for not acting in accordance with my beliefs. I was a vegetarian, briefly. I ate meat for most of my life, stopped for about three years, and have since resumed eating (large quantities of) animal flesh. I stopped eating meat (partly) for ethical reasons. During that time, I’d like to think that I didn’t irritate other people with lectures or attempts to convert to them to a plant-based diet. I don’t really remember talking about it unless explicitly asked. If asked, “do you think eating meat is ethical,” I would probably phrase my answer the way Diplock did in this thread. Which is to say: no, there’s really very little that’s ethical about it – most people don’t eat meat because they think it’s morally right to do so, they do it because it’s delicious, convenient, nutritious (sort of), and they want to. I think pretty much the same way about my classmates going into corporate practice. From having spoken to them, they’re doing it to repay their debt faster, to increase their exit options, to maximize their earning potential, and because they want to/like drafting. And, I don’t judge any of them for doing so: just like I didn’t care when my family ate pork chops, while I feasted on lima beans and edamame, I really don’t think I judge anyone for going into corporate practice. In choosing my area of practice, I want to take my final marching orders from individual people, not corporations. There’s a lot of reasons for that, which really all boil down to: “well, this is what feels important to me, and I want to do the thing that feels important.” But again, that doesn’t mean that I’m judging other people for believing that different things are important. And, I do sometimes wish that I could articulate those principles without so many other classmates / lawyers getting defensive. Because people often ask, why do you want to practice X and not something, y’know, more lucrative. And then they proceed to respond to my answer with something implying that I dumped all over their career.
  17. @Uriel described the appeal of transactional/corporate work very coherently here, but he's so preternaturally persuasive that I'm pretty sure he could stocking shelves at Walmart sound meaningful (I have, in fact, received money to stock shelves at Walmart, although very briefly):
  18. In fairness, the Good Wife involved less shouting at witnesses, and more dramatic plot twists stemming from last minute discoveries by the investigator, which, for some reason, were allowed into evidence despite amounting to a persistent strategy of trial-by-ambush. (Edit: my-exes have told me that I'm a lot of fun to watch TV with /s)
  19. Suits isn't really about the practice of law. It's mostly just people in corporate offices exercising very odd ethical decisionmaking, and then occasionally yelling at witnesses without having anything probative to ask.
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