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pinkroses

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  1. would strongly recommend evidence, it was very interesting and i also think it's useful.
  2. I can throw in my two cents. I did 1L at Western and transferred to Osgoode. I did my undergrad at UBC. I think that Western's law building is pretty from the outside (nice brick), but inside is underwhelming. Osgoode's building is nicer, and so is UBC's in my opinion. I'm willing to bet so is UofT's but don't know about other schools. HOWEVER - the building was nice enough and it didn't negatively affect my time there. there were always more than enough electrical outlets and i never had any negative issues. i wouldn't call it ugly. it did its job. i was comfortable going to class there, studying in the library there, meeting with profs there etc. it good classrooms and a chill area in chambers and also a like student hangout room where there's a pool table and there are couches. and it has a cafe. i don't really know what to say about it, i don't think that western's law building is something that would entice you to go to the school just on the basis of that (though idk if that should ever be that big of a factor) but i also don't think it should be a negative or dissuade you from going to western in any way.
  3. haha okay that is also true. that's kind of been my mindset about working during the school year. i worked a lot during the school year in undergrad, which definitely affected my grades, and at the end of the day it was like i earned 2k over the year, which was helpful but idk if it was worth almost not getting into law school over lol. and yeah i guess this will only be 6 weeks. thanks for your input.
  4. yeah that's what i was thinking. after hearing everyone's advice i'm definitely gonna decline the full-time job, but yeah i think i'll try to see if near where i live i can get a 1 or 2 day a week part-time job like in a cafe or clothing store or something, which like i probably won't be studying 24hrs a day 7 days a week anyways so i think it should be ok / i can always just quit if it's too much lol.
  5. Thanks for your replies everyone - I was already leaning towards not working, since it just feels kind of ridiculous to not be focusing on the Bar, but wanted to double check just in case. This confirms it for me though, so I won't take the full-time job.
  6. I'm writing the bar exams this June. I have the opportunity to work full-time while studying for the bar (May/June/July, then start articling in August). It's a job I've worked before and definitely won't require me to stay past 5pm or do any work outside of regular work hours, and isn't too stressful. I'm really stressed about money so this would definitely ease my worries a bit. But I also don't want to fail the bar..... is it realistic to work full-time while studying for the bar? How time consuming/intensive is bar studying? For reference i've been doing pretty well in law school and have taken some (but definitely not all) of the relevant courses for the bar. Any advice is appreciated. Thank you!
  7. I can give my personal experience, but i'm guessing for every person it's pretty different, and it also might depend on what school you go to. i go to osgoode so i can also speak a bit about the resources available there. sorry for the long message lol. i have pretty significant challenges with OCD, as well as some other personal challenges, and for me there have been some issues in law school for sure, but it's been manageable and over time i've learned how to manage it better. things that have helped me are registering with my school's academic accommodations office, so that way i can write my exams in a private room which helps and also have the option for flexible assignment deadlines (i've never used this but it's good to know that if i was having a particularly bad episode it's available), also just in general being registered means that if something were to come up, in general admin. and profs will probably be more understanding since you're already registered with accessibility services. i've also found it helpful to not take on too much, it's definitely positive and to an extent necessary to do some extra-curriculars to build your resume but courses and coping with a mental illness can already be a lot, so it's been helpful to me to manage my commitments accordingly. it's also possible to do an extended time degree (i think) where you could do the degree over more than 3 years. or there's the option to take a semester or a year off if necessary (though you would probably have to get approved by admin.). at osgoode we also have mental health counsellors, and you can make appointments to see them and just talk to them for support, and they can also connect you with resources at osgoode and york. if you're registered with accessibility services (and maybe even if you're not idk) you can also apply for a grant from osap to give you i think 2k per semester that you can use to cover the cost of therapy, and there's also a general grant for students with disabilities. so basically i think that law school is already really difficult, and any extra challenges can make it more difficult, but for me it's been manageable, and there are supports to help you. wrt working idk because i'm in 3L, but i do think that some jobs can be more accommodating than others. for example i really pursued government jobs, for a lot of different reasons, but one is because i know that they generally offer a better work/life balance than private firms, as well as more stability in terms of job security and pay and benefits etc., and i also know that (from what i've heard from coworkers at MAG in the summer) they allow you to take leaves of absence (unpaid) on top of your vacation days quite generously (like i know one person who left for 2 years and had their job still waiting for them, and another person who took 3 months off and had their job waiting for them). so i think that working in the legal profession can also be manageable, even in a big firm or outside of gov., it's just something you might have to think about and plan how it'll work out. also i feel like schools and employers have a legal duty to accommodate a disability, just want to throw that out there, though i'm not sure how that looks in practice.
  8. I just wanted to offer positive encouragement by saying that last year I only had 3 OCIs and 1 in-firm and I ended up getting the job. I know it can be kind of discouraging and also a bit stressful since it feels like you have fewer chances, but you are also in a good position since you'll have more time than people with more interviews to research and prepare, and also won't be as tired on the day of your interviews.
  9. last year i was i think number 5 for a gov office, and number 15 (lol) for a biglaw firm, the gov office i moved down to i think number 2 but didn't get off the list, and the biglaw firm i think i moved down to number 12 but unsurprisingly did not get off the list. just to give you an idea of (in my experience) the type of movement there could be.
  10. I'm a 3L at Osgoode selling the 2017-2018 Consolidated Ontario Securities Act, Regulations and Rules 63rd Edition published by BLG. I used it last year for Securities Regulation. Selling it for $60 (paid over $100 for it). It has some highlighting. I can meet anywhere in Toronto.
  11. i lived at 565 talbot in 1L. i liked it! not perfect but pretty good. i lived with a roommate and i thought the rent was pretty reasonable (i think we each paid 525 plus utilities or smth). the location is super good. really close walk to richmond row for going out like to bars and stuff, and also really close walk to the 106/6 bus stop that goes to school and also busses that go to masonville and stuff like that. also a pretty close walk to the greyhound station if you're going back to toronto or wherever. close-ish to the grocery store, there's a valumart that's like a 15ish minute walk, maybe even 20 mins, which is kinda far if you're carrying lots of groceries, but you can also take the bus for the 2 or 3 stops. the only con is that the building is not super nice, like it's definitely not a condo or anything near it lol, and the lobby sometimes smelled bad-ish (like really really strong cleaning products), and i definitely had some bug issues in my unit (like i frequently saw silverfish and centipedes) but it wasn't unbearable, like the bug issue was like a 3/10 issue for me. all in all i would give the building like a 7/10 haha.
  12. i'm not addressing reference letters to specific firms but just use the same for all, I did the same thing for OCIs and don't think it hurt me at all. wrt if they don't ask for letters, I feel like it doesn't really matter if you attach it or not, if you think you have a really good one then why not but if it's just so-so I wouldn't, but honestly I feel like it doesn't really matter. wrt how much they influence a decision idk but I feel like not that much.
  13. i am also interested in this. but fwiw i feel like they haven't, just because i feel like i would somehow know about it (through either getting one, hearing of a friend getting one, on fb, idk some other way) if they had. i also feel like it's still relatively early.
  14. as far as i know we at osgoode have the same plan as the york undergraduate students. york graduate students have a different (and i think better) plan than us but i don't think we have the option of enrolling in it. as far as i know the only option is the york undergraduate plan (or you can opt out of it and get your own insurance elsewhere). i feel like the link you posted is our plan but idk for sure. the link i use (which i'm also not 100% sure is our plan lol) is this one: http://www.yfs.ca/health-and-dental/.
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