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barelylegal

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barelylegal last won the day on August 18

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  1. barelylegal

    Improving Your Application for Articling

    You're not accounting for the competition aspect. If 20 seemingly highly qualified candidates are interviewing for 1, or 2, or even 5 spots, and 2 raise work-life balance off the bat (and the interview as a whole, not just the first question, is really "off the bat"), and 18 don't... I mean, you have to find ways to distinguish people somehow. You might not think it's fair, but that's what happens. All 20 candidates might turn out to be excellent students, but you don't know that. If someone asks a question that could be a red flag, and others don't, you need to manage that risk.
  2. barelylegal

    Improving Your Application for Articling

    Here's the thing though. Interviews are time-limited, and firms need to make the best decisions they can about candidates on the limited information available. I can only speak from the perspective of my own firm, but we want to hire people who are excited about the kind of work we do. If someone is given an opportunity to ask questions in an interview, and their chosen questions in that limited time are all about "work-life balance", our firm's social activities, etc. - i.e. everything they could be doing other than working - it may not be unreasonable to draw an inference about the priorities, in contrast to people who care to ask what kind of work we give students, the amount of involvement students get to have in files, business development topics, etc.
  3. What do you mean by "actively hiring"? With the caveat that I'm not particularly knowledgeable about the process for foreign-trained lawyers, my understanding is that unless you get the articling requirement waived (and I don't know anything about this process), you would need to look for an articling position, not a lawyer position. There's a centralized recruit for articling students during the summer of the calendar year before the articling term generally begins (i.e. for students who participate in this recruit, they would do so in the summer of 2018 to start articling in the summer of 2019, and so on). This doesn't involve any on-campus hiring - you submit applications, and then firms decide who to bring in for interviews.
  4. barelylegal

    Are lawyers still using typewriters?

    I would generally ask a clerk to help me with more substantive, generally document-oriented, tasks. Examples of things I would ask my legal assistant to help with: Preparing document shells for letters / court materials / facta, formatting documents, coordinating service or couriers, filing my emails, adding things to my calendar, booking boardrooms, calling the court or other counsel for information, obtaining motion dates. Examples of things I would ask a law clerk to help with: Coding documents, preparing affidavits of documents, reviewing transcripts, preparing document briefs, attending examinations for discovery to help manage documents. I think this can vary by practice area as well. For example, I know some personal injury law clerks will meet with clients, draft pleadings, etc.
  5. barelylegal

    We're Starting Articles Soon. Give us advice!

    Short, but regular, breaks have always helped me with mental stamina. When switching tasks, I might do a quick online crossword, or grab a coffee alone or with a friend, or check LS, or wander the halls for another associate in need of a break, or something else to check out a bit before diving into something new. Helps me refresh and keep the fatigue from setting in sooner.
  6. barelylegal

    Sample Exam Answers

    There should be sample exams online at Queen's, though likely not answers. If you draft answers to the sample exam questions, professors are often willing to meet with you and give you advice/comments on your draft answers - I did that multiple times while there. As @providence notes, the best insight you can get is from your own professors.
  7. barelylegal

    Omnibus topic: when you are not hired back

    I just mean that generally, there are more people looking for first year associate positions than there are looking for 2-4 year associate positions. If a firm is looking for a first year associate, there are lots of people at that experience level applying, and with someone that junior the experiential expectations might be lower. If a firm is looking for a 2-4 year associate, they might get far fewer appropriately qualified applicants (plus tons of applications from people trying to convince them to hire a first year for the spot). On top of that, when a firm is looking for someone with some experience, they might be looking for particular interests or competencies or experiences, which further narrows down the pool, and then when you add personality factors, it narrows even more. If a firm is looking for an associate with X years of experience, in X field, how many candidates will there be that (a) fit that criteria, (b) are interesting in switching firms, (c) are interested in that firm, and (d) at a time that matches when the firm is looking? Of course, I can only speak to what I've seen at my own firm, but I'd be surprised if this differs elsewhere.
  8. barelylegal

    Attire for 'coffee chat' style meetings

    I give you the short-sleeved blazer: http://www.joblackcraze.co.uk/religion-slim-blazer-in-black-with-short-sleeve-black-blazers-men-p-135.html https://cnconqueror.en.made-in-china.com/product/QBVxaNLFhukH/China-New-Style-Men-s-Short-Sleeve-Black-Slim-Fit-Suit.html
  9. barelylegal

    Transition After Articling

    This is an odd arrangement. I see a lot of potential issues with this. For that week, are you in an articling principal / student relationship? If so, there's a process you would need to follow to terminate your articles, it isn't just done on a whim. Are you now considered to have accepted an articling offer? If so, and you decide not to stick around after a week, how are you going to complete your articling term? It's not like you can look for a backup position now - Law Society procedures provide that students who have already accepted an articling offer can't thereafter participate in interviews with other firms or accept offers subsequently received. And if you wait until next summer to look for other options, your other options will be quite limited. I don't really know the answers to these questions. I just encourage you to think about them, do your own research, ensure you know what the parameters are.
  10. barelylegal

    OCI PROCESS QUESTION - URGENT

    I assume you're talking about Toronto OCIs. Short answer: No. The OCI recruitment procedure is, basically, the earliest that firms are permitted to conduct recruitment activities. In broad terms, firms that participate in OCIs are those that are large or consistently busy enough to have a sense of how many students they want to hire nearly a year in advance, want to scoop up the "top" candidates, etc. The OCI procedures provide structure for this early hiring scramble. Employers aren't required to participate in the OCI process, and lots of firms/employers don't participate in the OCI recruit, for various reasons. Maybe they aren't in a position to know, nearly a year in advance, how many articling students they'll want to hire, or if they'll be hiring at all. Maybe they just don't recruit that far in advance for other reasons. Maybe they want to hire at their own pace, and not be bound by Law Society regulations in that respect. These employers can hire at any time, and you're open to apply to their postings should you not secure a position in the OCI recruit. In broad terms, these employers which hire later on tend to be smaller or more specialized firms, or corporations, or regulatory bodies, or unions, or other less-traditional legal employers.
  11. barelylegal

    Improving Your Application for Articling

    I would worry about the optics of connecting with an articling candidate on LinkedIn in advance of interviews. In particular: If during a formal recruitment period, could connecting with an applicant during a regulated period ever be viewed as offside Law Society rules? As an articling interviewer, I'm instructed by my firm to avoid any communication with applicants to the extent possible. If I accept a connection request, could the applicant read into it something about their chances of being hired? I don't want to add to the already-extensive list of things that articling candidates read into.
  12. And just when I thought it couldn't get any more hilarious - your order also comes with "two LSAC approved number 2 pencils and a specialized eraser". Incredible. Honestly, I respect the person that saw the incredible anxiety of would-be law students and thought to create something like this. Not at all surprised that it's sold out.
  13. barelylegal

    Interests Section

    Man... that Kristen really blew her interview. I interviewed someone who listed "trashy reality TV" as an interest, and gave examples of what are likely some of the most notoriously trashy reality shows. It just so happened that both I and my co-interviewer watched one of them, and it turned into an excellent conversation-starter. I actually respected the confidence I imagine it took to include something like that, which wouldn't necessarily resonate well or reflect positively with every audience - high risk, high reward, in that case.
  14. Lots of boutiques / mid-sized firms don't do third interviews or lunches or things like that.
  15. First off - to answer your question, as others have said, it's not an issue if you don't have any business background going into business law. You learn what you need to know on the job. Second - unlike other posters, I don't put much stock into your comment that you have no interest in business. When I started law school, I had no background in business and thought it was the most boring thing ever. My father would try to show me interesting business articles in the newspaper and I'd immediately tune out. It was, quite literally, the last thing I ever thought I'd be doing. Fast forward to today, and I'm now a commercial litigator, dealing daily with those things I used to find boring - and finding them fascinating. Turns out that practicing law in a certain area is very different from just reading about the area in a general sense. Granted, I'm a litigator, but I'd think the idea applies more broadly. Full service / corporate firms are a great way to get solid training at the start of your career. Just don't rule out the possibility that you might actually like it.
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