Jump to content

kurrika

Members
  • Content Count

    16519
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    105

kurrika last won the day on April 16

kurrika had the most liked content!

Community Reputation

7400 Good People

3 Followers

About kurrika

  • Rank

Recent Profile Visitors

4819 profile views
  1. If the job posting specifies that they are hiring for a position and establishing an eligibility list the hiring person can choose to create an eligibility list. You stock your eligibility list with people you would have hired, and rank them based on how they scored. If you are smart, you say "may establish an eligibility list" so if you interview a bunch of people who technically pass but who don;t wow you , you just don't establish a list. If you are hiring the same job description again during the time period you have to hire off the list. I don't know how the AG hires lawyers.
  2. I can't tell you the turn over rate for those jobs / rate of openings. I can say that it is fairly common to hire off of eligibility lists in the BC government, and that when I've hired off an eligibility list, outside candidates tend to get new jobs and are less likely to be available to hire when you want them (because they are good hires, so likely to find work somewhere). You typically have to go further down an eligibility list if it is made up of outside of government people. So don't worry too much about your spot on the list. If they have a bunch of spots opening up in the next year chances are good. That said, keep applying.
  3. @rglasgow does procurement I think.
  4. My personal opinion - a competitive candidate is one who: has strong grades over all and tax courses in particular has demonstrated an interest in tax (course selection and extracurriculars - this easier now than it was, there are lots more moots and other activities) can write and converse fluently and comfortably in tax concepts and tax case law (so you pass the interview and tests) has some social skills More tax courses, is of course better. So are black letter law courses. Demonstrating sustained interest in tax is important because you are going to be doing tax, all day, every day. If don't love it, you will likely grow hate your life and then start doing bad work or pissing off the other clerks by slacking. Social skills are important because 90 per cent of your time is going to be spent interacting with the other clerks. It's tax camp basically. If you are a horrible troll or a weird lump, it will be a bad atmosphere.
  5. https://ubcgrades.com/ https://ubcgrades.com/course-profile/ Some clever fellow stripped all the data from UBC's statistics website and made an easy to search version.
  6. Back in the good old days at UBC there was a way to see the grade distribution of all courses
  7. Maybe I'm old, or I'm used to a different curve out on the west coast. But getting 4 As of any flavour as your first year marks would be a stellar performance. An A or A+ pretty much means the course prize for the year. They hand As out like candy out east or something?
  8. When I clerked about half the clerks (maybe more?) had applied in third year and were coming from articles elsewhere.
  9. https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=3647633 May help some student at some point, so linking.
  10. I'm not judging the compensation or the set up. I am worried that the nature of the relationship between articling student and principal means that it is impossible for the test for independent contractor to be met, and both the student and the principal could be in for a nasty surprise when the CRA comes knocking.
  11. Caveat: Morgans LLP insists on Saville Row. The firm has a grudge against italians / italy in general since Italian Republic refused to pay for a bunch of work the firm had done for Mussolini / the Republic of Salò.
  12. Tari's book is Federal Income Tax Litigation in Canada Bourgard's is the Tax Court Practice or the Portable Tax Court practice.
  13. Not solo, but there are a number of judges who came from smaller business firms and would have been the tax specialist there. Pizzitelli practiced in Orillia and then Barrie for example.
×
×
  • Create New...