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bumblebee

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bumblebee last won the day on August 15

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  1. Demonstrating an interest is going to look different to management vs union side firms. I had a bunch of blue collar jobs and NDP volunteering on my resume which prompted all the management firms to ask me whether I'd have an ideological problem working for them. I would have. I'd only applied out of fear of unemployment. It was awkward. Don't be like me.
  2. Is this not currently the case for people who once had an illegal grow op in their houses? My bat shit crazy cousin couldn't get a mortgage on his new house because of the basement grow op he got busted for several years ago. Though to be fair, there are many reasons no one should lend him any money.
  3. The ban on "Muslim math" was one of my favourite parts of the last season of Veep.
  4. When I would visit my grandmother she would tell every single person who walked into her house that "this is my granddaughter. SHE'S A LAWYER." Using the same tone of voice that one might use to explain that I had cured cancer or landed on the moon. The home care worker or the guy who stopped in to read the hydro meter probably wasn't that interested. She had a grade 8 education and most of her many children barely got their grade 12. She would probably have been just as proud of me if I had married a nice dairy farmer. I used to find it a bit excessive and embarrassing but now that she's gone, it makes me really happy to think she thought the neighbours would be really impressed by her lawyer granddaughter.
  5. I have no insight at all into private practice but I worked for a few government agencies/ministries whose entire legal departments were full of mothers of young children. Once we had a joint baby shower for two lawyers that were due on the same day. These jobs are 9 to 5 and no one is on call or thinks about work for a minute outside of business hours. Obviously, only some government jobs are like this and you have to look for them but they definitely exist. The pay range was also limited to something like 80k to 120k. There is a lot of variety in law jobs.
  6. It's been a long time since I did this and was not an expert then. The first part of your question sounds accurate. Though many times I was witnessing signatures that were on government forms, so I really just had to fill out the blanks on the form. I only used the notary stamp if the document actually needed to be notarized. Sometimes they just needed a commissioner of oaths. I have no idea about the multi page question. Maybe someone else knows.
  7. https://stepstojustice.ca/questions/employment-and-work/should-i-be-paid-training-or-trial-shift I don't know if this kind of thing is allowed here, but this is a useful website.
  8. Don't worry. I did some interesting stuff.
  9. I over committed in 2L to a bunch of ECs because it seemed like that's what everyone else was doing and it was a major time suck, made me miserable, and I deeply regretted it. That being said, I got very involved in clinic work which led to summer jobs, demonstrated my interest and dedication to a niche area of law, and directly led to my articling job. I was a very mediocre student. There had to be higher achieving students applying for that position but I had three years of relevant work experience and a winning personality. My involvement also made sense in the context of my life story and why I went to law school. If I could do it again I would have just done the clinic plus something fun like yoga, or intramural volleyball or wine tasting or something.
  10. Are you worried about the bar exam impacting your wedding or the wedding impacting your bar exam prep? A lot of non-optional stressful life events can and will occur at inconvenient times. Is a wedding going to be easier to plan a year later when you're articling and working full time? Studying for the bar exam is a pretty flexible time and involves as much work and energy as you want to put into it. The day after I wrote my bar exam I had scheduled a fairly serious surgery to remove a tumor that turned out to be benign. The months waiting for it were among the worst in my life for a variety of reasons, but I still managed to pass the exam while being not that focused. If you want to get married then and that time works for your family, you should do it. Life is short and far greater problems will come your way. Don't postpone happiness for a standardized test you can literally re-write a few months later.
  11. I only examined an expert witness once in my legal career and I felt like Perry Fucking Mason. Afterwards I realized that I had been wildly mispronouncing the name of the disease in question. No one in all the prep of the expert and discussion with my articling principle had been able to tell me. I assume that they were just too embarrassed for me.
  12. First, this thread title is misleading... Second, if it's a great job that is in the legal field, and assuming that you are not a brand new call, I can't imagine having too much difficulty going back to practice if that's what you want after three years. You can keep your license as long as you keep paying your "non-practicing" fee.
  13. It's unseemly. I only knew about it because the story appeared about ten times in my Twitter feed.
  14. You are overthinking this. Wear whichever makes you more comfortable and confident.
  15. https://www.oba.org/Professional-Development-Resources/CPD-Programming https://store.lsuc.on.ca/programs http://www.advocates.ca/new/education/upcoming-programs.html These are the obvious ones. Are you in Ontario?
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