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  1. 50 points
    Like many of you, I could not believe it when I saw it. After getting rejected everywhere last year, I wasn't sure if I was going to get in. I am happy to say that I was accepted today. LFG!!! cGPA: 3.62 LSAT: 156
  2. 23 points
    This is not how this thread works, but congratulations on your offer.
  3. 22 points
    Hi all - this forum has been so helpful (and anxiety-inducing, at times!) that I wanted to share my personal adventure on the road to law school acceptances - for those needing a bit of love and support at this time in the application cycle. When I first considered applying to law, I wrote the LSAT on a whim and scored in the 140's; a few months later, I tried again, with a one-point increase in score. I had applied to UVic that year (also on a whim, so stupid), and was rejected (duh). My self-confidence was bruised, and I figured law wasn't for me, so I put the idea of law school to bed. After a good deal of wallowing, some painful self-discovery, and way too many episodes of Gilmore Girls, I decided to pull my socks up and try, try again. I was in graduate school at the time and self-studied while completing my thesis (so stupid - see a theme here?). I wrote the exam and scored in the 150's. Forever the idealist, I re-wrote a few months later, still in time for that application cycle at UVic, and scored the exact same as before. This was a fantastic wake-up call, fueled by two years of rejection. The LSAT is a beast, I was not "smart enough" to take it on without support - that's something I needed to accept. I dished out a painful $1,000, took time off work, and gave myself one month of full-time studying to try, try again. I told the instructors of the course that my goal was a 160, because I truly thought that's all I would be able to achieve. Progress was slow, but as the month came to a close, I saw improvement, scoring on practice tests between 160-162. I wrote the exam for a fifth time, and scored a 163. This year, I applied to five schools: TRU, U of M, U of A, U of S, and UVic. I've been accepted to all/waitlisted at UVic. My approach to the LSAT was sloppy, I recognize that. I was nauseatingly idealistic about my ability to self-study and receive an offer with some cheesy 80's music playing the background with smiles all around. For the majority of us, getting into law school is tough, admissions committees are ruthless - but that stubborn determination paid off, even if it took a few years! So, for those of you tackling the LSAT right now, or waiting anxiously to hear from the schools you applied to, know that if it doesn't happen this year, or on this exam, you have options, and you have time. One way or another, you'll make it happen. Be ambitious, stay strong, keep hoping, and be the badass future law student that you are. Cheers! 🍻
  4. 22 points
    I turned down this offer earlier today. Thank you all for your input.
  5. 21 points
    As a follow-up, I accepted a paid position from a promising personal injury firm just now. Thank you all for your sound advice.
  6. 20 points
    For those of us who are already forced, ethically, to do pro bono work for vulnerable clients, I'll lower any remaining boundaries and say this is a fucking disgrace. A fucking disgrace we all could see coming--but, nonetheless, a fucking disgrace. The reactionary bullshit of "Well, don't commit a crime then," is just too much to handle after a long and difficult week. I don't want to believe things are that bad. Though I know they are. My LAO clients (and the ones who can't even get LAO) are the most vulnerable and marginalized persons likely to die in the ditch they're calling home. To suggest that they set their own trials and advocate their own Charter defences and/or factual defences is a sick joke. I'm tired of this. I can see how my clients live before they die at 35. Hey, no problem paying a Crown $200,000 to prosecute some homeless and mentally ill person. But I guess our government draws the line at paying a lawyer (maybe even now a duty counsel lawyer) a pittance to defend that client. We'll see how these cuts shake out--what services are cut, what jobs are slashed. From what I've seen working in courthouses 5 days/week, there's no "fat." Maybe it'll be the entire non-CCC (i.e. refugee/immigration/landlord-tenant) wing. Who knows. I see duty counsel run off their feet in every jurisdiction. I guess we'll see. It's goddamn sad.
  7. 19 points
    Op, tbh, only do it if your gf is OVER 2 points above you on the scale, and has discussed marriage with you. That’s, in my option, the only way to rationalize it.
  8. 18 points
    I did not know I needed to explicitly state reasons to post on this forum - I ask because I am a young associate myself and I want to hear more from women who’ve been doing it longer. i want to hear their genuine experience without being sugarcoated for workplace formalities. As a woman on Bay St myself I find myself wondering what makes YOU assume we’re not? 3-5 years were in brackets as an example. Personally, that is my experience. I am asking how to balance killing it at work, as I try, and having quality time with my husband. I want to hear Senior Associates + Partners’ with children experience Reality is, on Bay, there are women, like me (thats what makes me assume), who want to make Partner and want to start a family and who may also be of colour and are more likely prone to code switch often. Side note though (I’ve been reading your comments on the forum for a while) I dont believe you’re on Bay St + I am certainly not interested in your male partner’s experience, so I don’t understand why you’re commenting in a manner clearly intending to undermine the purpose of my post.
  9. 18 points
    To me, the key part of this subject title is the anxiety over giving up something "for good." That's something you (and all law students) need to make peace with. When you are young and talented and privileged you go all your early life getting told you can do anything. You internalize that message. And to a degree there's truth to it. But the other side of that truth is that you won't do everything. You can't. Obviously. Don't try to keep all your options open. It's an idiotic and self-defeating way to live. Every choice you make, every path you commit to, implicitly rejects other choices and other paths. If you fear closing off options, you'll continually hedge against committing to the things you actually want. And that's no way to live.
  10. 17 points
  11. 16 points
    Ok. Now I know all I need to know. Tell these people to go fuck themselves. Edit to add: Don't actually say that. But this is shady as fuck.
  12. 16 points
    Baby Lawyer sounds like a really bad movie starring the Rock as the part-time dad of Baby Lawyer who gets looped in to helping Baby Lawyer take on a big bad pharmaceutical company all the way to SCOTUS and along the way learns the true meaning of fatherhood.
  13. 15 points
    For anyone who's reading this, who may have received bad grades just as I did.... Just know that I received two job offers (not through OCI's) for summer work. One with a mid-size firm, one with a boutique firm. Grades do not define your success, if you learn to network, interview well and sell yourself properly.
  14. 14 points
    Accepted this morning! First law school acceptance after getting rejected everywhere last year. 3.8 GPA with drops, 164 LSAT, MA degree. Feels good to finally share an acceptance!!
  15. 14 points
    My advice to you (and what would have made 1L much more enjoyable) is to drown out all the noise. Most law students are lovely but some are absolutely insufferable. They’ll humble brag about how their undergrad in Xyz studies has prepped them so well and half the classes are like review, or they’ll go on and on about that family member that’s a lawyer, the list goes on and on. Coming from an educational background that’s vastly different or never having been exposed to the law, this can be intimidating. But I promise you no one has an edge and no 1L knows what the hell theyre doing. Everyone is just as confused and unprepared as you are
  16. 14 points
    Got the email just now. cGPA: 3.5 LSAT: 155 As a current fourth year at UofT, I'm honestly very ecstatic to be approaching my final days in this extremely unpleasant, money-hungry, apathetic institution. Good luck to everyone else and see ya never UofT. 😎
  17. 13 points
    Wow, if a Crown did that in a trial I was on, I would protest to the judge. It’s not the Crown’s role to ask people to leave open court who aren’t causing any trouble. And a person testifying at trial is not necessarily a “victim.” If onlookers are discreet and respectful, I don’t see a problem - all witnesses should be prepared for that possibility. The judge controls courtroom decorum/procedure, and there are tools to assist witnesses such as screens, support persons etc, so I don’t mean to be insensitive - if it becomes apparent to a judge that a witness is struggling with the courtroom environment, this should be addressed, and there are options that fall short of the drastic action of kicking the public out of court. I think a law student who is serious about wanting a career in criminal law SHOULD watch the graphic and explicit stuff - how else can they know if this is an area they really want to practice? I agree junior high kids probably aren’t ready for sex assault trials, but law students should be.
  18. 13 points
  19. 13 points
    This will seem petty but I swear it isn’t: it’s “advice.”. Advice is a noun. You want advice. Give me advice. Inviting advice. It is pronounced exactly as it is spelled Advise is a verb. I advise you to wait. You advise action. Advise me. It is pronounced as if the “s” were a “z”. It is a very very common mistake but as a new lawyer you need to know the difference.
  20. 13 points
    Chicago Kent is a bottom second-tier law school in the US ranked around 72 of the 200 law schools there. Why would a Canadian who presumably wants to practice law in Canada AND has good stats apply to crappy foreign law schools?
  21. 12 points
    I also say this with respect, and as someone who struggled with anxiety and other mental health issues in the past, you may just want to reapply in a few years, and in the meantime work, grow, and focus on your mental health. If the idea of a temporary move for school is so overwhelming, maybe this isn't the best time to pursue law school. Again, I mean this with nothing but respect and genuine compassion. Taking a few years isn't a failure, it might be the biggest blessing and the best path to success for you.
  22. 12 points
    Accepted today! Seriously cannot believe it because of my low LSAT. CGPA: 3.5 (OLSAS) LSAT: 153 (Nov 2018), 154 (Jan 2019) My L2 is complicated because of additional courses and internships. Heavily involved in school and community work in all my undergrad years, worked 30-40 hours a week while in undergrad, currently full time in school and working in the community. Optional essay. In queue since January 9th.
  23. 12 points
    Out of respect for those waiting, I will promptly decline the offer, so one more spot should open up shortly. Let’s all try to keep the process moving by notifying schools that we know we won’t be attending. Good luck all!
  24. 12 points
    Just wanted to update everyone. I got the offer and turned it down. I feel bad because I like the firm and its people a lot. But ultimately it's the right decision. I wanted to say thanks for all your input, it helped steer me in the right direction.
  25. 12 points
    Where did you read that? Whoever wrote it clearly doesn't know what they're talking about. Look, there are some good articling experiences and some bad ones. Just as there are some good jobs with great co-workers and bosses, and terrible jobs with a toxic work environment. Overall, the reason articling involves stress and long hours is because that is exactly what the practice of law entails. This is not because a "toxic work environment" has been normalized in the profession. It's a simple reality that most lawyers are expected to be on call 24/7, have to work longer than 9-5 out of sheer necessity, and deal with stressful situations purely by the fact that the entire job is about dealing with conflict. If I had an articling experience where I was working 9-5 with only moderate pressure (all of which would have to be artificially enforced) I would have completely crumbled as an associate when I could not work 9-5 and would have the entire weight of a file on me. This is not to say that there aren't genuinely abusive articling positions out there. There are. But this view that the entire profession has a disposition towards exploitation is just silly. Insofar as people are complaining to the law society because they think their working hours are "unreasonable" or they are too stressed out, I'd suggest they quit right now because the practice of law is not for them.
  26. 12 points
    What people normally mean by "strong ECs" is "weak grades and/or LSAT." I've known students who had ECs that would make the average applicant cry out of frustration, if they knew that's what the competition looked like. But those aren't the students talking about their "strong ECs" at all. The students who talk up their ECs were the Presidents of their "pre-law" clubs. The ones who are on the Boards of national NFPs, who wrote books, were published in scholarly journals as undergrads, who compete internationally as athletes...they don't say anything at all. And generally they ALSO have strong grades and LSATs.
  27. 12 points
    I don't know if it was an off-the-cuff addition when you wrote about your sister's "deep depression" but assuming this is at all accurate, your approach to this situation is entirely wrong. I'm sorry, but it is. Put it this way. If you were concerned that your sister was falling into a deep depression because she couldn't find a boyfriend, would you be on a dating site right now, trying to solve this problem for her? Or would you be focused (as you should be) on your sister's precarious mental health rather than the thing that triggered her precarious mental health? Stressors and hurdles in law and legal practice are pretty much never-ending. After finding articles comes the stage where a job very likely doesn't live up to one's dreams, and you're working really punishing hours for a lawyer or a firm that may not appear to appreciate or value your work. Or you're working on a file (to use an immigration-related example) where your client is likely to be deported and he's telling you his life isn't worth living if that happens and he's going to kill himself, and yet there's nothing you can do to prevent it from happening. Or it's simply that you article, don't get hired back, and you're in the same situation - unemployed. This isn't going to stop for your sister. Right now, she's experiencing an ordinary sort of problem. If it's seriously impacting her mental health, then that's the problem - not the challenge she's immediately experiencing right now. You aren't in a position to solve your sister's career for her. It's nice you want to try, but you aren't reasonably equipped to do that. Get your sister support with her depression and with her mental health. That's how you help.
  28. 12 points
    I’m not even sure UT lets you graduate if you don’t own your own caviar spoons. Anyway, as long as you have one tux for each day of the week, you’ll be fine.
  29. 11 points
    I foresee many such post-facto justifications
  30. 11 points
    Did you call and inquire before you applied? That would have been the intelligent thing to do if this was a real concern of yours. Come on, people. All these cries of 'unfair' are a bit silly. Who ever told you that life was fair? If you're this upset over a stated policy that you didn't investigate further, what are you going to do when you don't like being graded on a curve, or you don't get more OCIs than a classmate, or someone else gets hired back and you don't? I would caution those of you making the negative comments about those who have received acceptances, to remember that you may get in and then those people you are denigrating will be your classmates. Is this really the way you want to meet new friends, classmates and future colleagues? Lastly, it's mid-March. There is still lots of time to go in this cycle and there are likely to be many more offers made. Waiting sucks but allowing it to direct your confusion/anger/resentment towards others isn't productive and ultimately will only make the waiting worse.
  31. 11 points
    The trick to succeeding at property law is realizing that it is fun. People try to make it boring or confusing, but they are wrong and bad. You can dig into just about any part of property law and find some interesting bit of trivia, or an exciting bit of history. For example, you have of course watched Showtime's wonderful program, The Tudors. Has your professor pointed out that the various equitable interests generally stem from reforms done by Cardinal Wolsey (played by Sam Neill)? Or all the fun property law based prosecutions he did to prevent the enclosure movement? The statute of fraud's rise due to the increase of the use of uses (now trusts) and the fact that you can't pass a trust through livery of seisen? And the torren's system - it can be a dry subject at time, but there is drama behind its introduction, practically everywhere that has adopted the system has had to fight against the local legal profession to get it put into place.
  32. 10 points
    Admitted this morning. Cgpa 3.63 L2 3.85 Lsat 150 (november), january (cancelled) March (score pending) Average ECs, Strong PS, Great References Not sure if the committee forgot to wear their glasses today (given the lsat score), but hey I ain’t complaining, bless their souls. Will likely be accepting! Good luck everyone else waiting!
  33. 10 points
    I'm a practicing lawyer in rural Newfoundland. Can confirm there is no shortage of lawyers out there, the market is well served, if not better served, by not having its own law school. Many Newfoundlanders, mainly those from St. John's who grow up there, go to MUN, and then go to law school, have never left home before going to law school. Their law school experience is really their first step out into the world and I shudder at the thought of the day when we are graduating law students who have no idea how to function on their own as people. I'm practicing in a town of about 10,000 people and half of our local bar is under age 40, which I think demonstrates that it's not hard to attract people to work here. Basically, kids grow up here, move away for education and go to law school so that they have the freedom to come home and make a decent living. Newfoundland has a very robust legal aid commission, whereby pretty much anybody can come in off the street and get free summary legal advice from a lawyer. I'm not how much use a legal clinic would be for the people of St. John's. As it stands right now, between the graduates coming back to NL from UNB and Dalhousie, the job market is already stretched and there are grads who struggle to find work. I know people that have been firm jumping since they graduated, just trying to maintain steady employment. I don't know where we're going to put 100 grads per year from MUN, but I imagine there'll be a lot of them wandering around downtown St. John's and Halifax trying to find a paycheque. There are only 500,000 people in this entire province. We're arguably saturated now.
  34. 10 points
    Just so this thread doesn’t get derailed, for OP’s sake - we’ve had a private discussion and I think we are all good. I did not mean to come across as unhelpful, I am sorry for that, and I hope OP can get some meaningful answers from those able to give them, and not just bickering about who said what to whom. I think these are important questions that deserve serious responses and did not mean to suggest otherwise. Sorry again. 😊
  35. 10 points
    accepted this morning. after getting rejected from ottawa yesterday i had really lost hope. 3.7 L2 and 159 LSAT. most likely accepting. Has anyone gotten the offer letter yet???
  36. 10 points
    Could we consider replacing the existing "10 reasons (not) to go to my school" threads with new ones in each school's page? These threads have potential to be so useful but when browsing through them, I sometimes have to skim/read through pages of content before getting to content relevant to one of the schools I'm considering. Someone who doesn't want to go to school X probably doesn't care to read about it (and if they do, they could go browse the thread in that school's page.) Also, sometimes people quote someone else and a reference to which school they're talking about is lost so their comments become useless unless I try to find the original post they quoted from. By keeping these threads in each school's page, it'll be obvious that whatever some is saying is about the school I'm looking at.
  37. 10 points
    Accepted this morning via email! Still can’t believe it. CGPA: 3.53 L2: 3.75 LSAT:156 last name starts with G and I’ve been in queue since February 27th. Good luck to everyone still waiting! My offer hasn’t been uploaded on OLSAS but when it is I will be accepting for sure. Excited to meet you all next year!
  38. 10 points
    The fact that Canadian universities are allowed to promote garbage programs like this at the expense of unsuspecting high school students who believe that holding a law degree makes you a lawyer is just deplorable.
  39. 10 points
    You aren't the first person to ask this...have a look at the other threads on this exact topic. It is also difficult to generalize what works for one person to other people or often to even know why one person is doing well and others aren't. I did well in law school, have read a million exams and talked to those students about them, and even I find it difficult to always know why some succeed and others don't. That being said, here's my top...probably more than 5 but less than 10 list. 1. Get your ducks in a row before you start school. Go to the dentist, learn to type quickly, etc. But don't spend time stressing about law school before it starts. 2. Don't listen to other people. Lots of people humblebrag about how little they are working and yet how well they are doing. Half of them are exaggerating and the other half are just somehow infuriatingly good at law school. Other people will go on and on about how many hours they are working for and you will feel stressed about the fact that you weren't at the library as long. Many of those people spent the majority of that time wasting time on the internet. 3. Eventually you might find that you can get by with skipping certain classes or readings, but start out doing as much of the work as you possibly can until you figure out what works. 4. DO PRACTICE EXAMS BEFORE THE REAL THING. 5. You might not be good at writing exams under time constraints. This will make first year difficult, but don't let it discourage you. In 2L and 3L you can do papers, moots, classes with assignments, etc. 6. If you don't understand something, go see your professors. If you did poorly on an exam, go see your professors. 7. Don't just bring your 75 or 100 or whatever page set of notes into the exam, regardless of how well tabbed it is. You also need a shorter version of your notes with just the key information. This will help you move through the exams quickly.
  40. 10 points
    Accepted Nov 28. LSAT - 174 GPA - 3.99 Probably rejecting for Harvard
  41. 10 points
    I articled working 9-5 and thrived as an associate. Hell, I still do 45-50 tops, except for trial times. Though if you really love working that many hours, I'll leave you my card. My separation agreement rates are very reasonable.
  42. 10 points
    Learn to cook and do your own laundry and iron a dress shirt. Get a suit and wear it around a bit until it’s a comfortable outfit and not a dress up costume. My usual advice is to go to a fancy bar and order a drink. Update all your health stuff - prescriptions, glasses, teeth, get a physical, etc. Then get photos of your family and friends developed and throw them in some frames. You’re going to want them in your new digs. Finish the novel you have been meaning to read. Finish knitting the scarf you started or building the shed in your parent’s backyard or whatever. Finish your tasks to feel good and motivated for the next steps. Read Getting To Maybe and relax.
  43. 10 points
    Accepted today! cGPA: 2.98 L2: 3.70 LSAT: 159 General applicant
  44. 9 points
    No, it isn't. But if you live in Ontario and care about the rights of accused, of parents and children involved with CAS, and of persons facing removal / deportation, please contact your MPP and tell them that you oppose cuts to LAO's certificate programs. If you live in Ontario and think homelessness is bad, that renovictions are bad, that victims of violent crime should get compensation, and that those with mental disabilities might need help at SBT hearings, please contact your MPP and tell them that you oppose deep cuts to your local Community Legal Clinic. If you think that the justice system works better when litigants are informed and represented, please call your MPP and tell them that you oppose the cuts to LAO. These cuts aren't going anywhere. But most of the people coming to this site are advocates or advocates in training. So advocate. Don't duck and wait for electoral salvation. There are a lot of cases on the docket between now and 2022.
  45. 9 points
    Just got the green check mark! CGPA: 3.32 L2: 3.5 LSAT: 149,160,161 Access
  46. 9 points
    Wtf? Did you say you were a Nazi sympathizer or something in your application?
  47. 9 points
    Accepted this morning! CGPA: 3.41; L2: 3.7 LSAT: 154 (Jan 2019), 152 (Sept 2018) Strong ECS (Community artist/leader, research analyst, real estate legal assistant) Strong References from professors I've worked with Worked full time between multiple jobs while in undergrad; Filled out part B due to a concussion which resulted in chronic seizures halfway through undergrad. General applicant. Went straight from "no decision yet" to "admitted" - did not go into queue Osgoode is truly holistic, there is hope for those with lower stats but strong credentials!!
  48. 9 points
    I say the below with respect and acknowledge your good stats. I can understand that from your position things may not seem fair and waiting out for a decision you really want to hear back from really sucks. But I also say this as one of those 153 LSAT maritimers you seem to be looking down your nose at. I'm also saying this because every time someone tries to explain this to you you seem to escalate into this 'not fair' narrative. In an earlier comment you mentioned the 153 student really shows you what UNB is looking for. I would agree in that the school is looking at factors that cannot be determined by numbers alone. I would also dare suggest that said person perhaps demonstrated other traits that the school was looking for. We do not know if they were accepted simply because they were from the maritimes. Honestly you seem to be blaming maritimers for not leaving room for you at UNB. Why should they when you yourself stated that the main reason you wanted to go there was because of the small student body. Maritimers have been born and raised there, not to mention demonstrated some measure of loyalty to a province that has barely anything going for it (no offence to my NB brothers and sisters, but it is true). You have been accepted to other schools and yet are totally caught up on this 'how dare they' complex directed at UNB; a school that is honestly trying its hardest to maintain the law infrastructure in the province because if they dont then you can count on no one else doing it. This is an assumption, but it seems you want to come in for 3 years to a school with only 96 seats then immediately leave, so honestly why should the school accept you ahead of a maritimer? I'm not saying you shouldn't be allowed in, but I'm trying to put this into perspective, much like IrishStew and CrystalClear. I agree that province preference isn't necessarily fair, but every professional school does it because there aren't enough schools to go around and ultimately people tend to just go back home once they are done. Each school has a duty to maintain the professional structure of the province it is in first and foremost. It may not seem fair, but it is actually an ethical principle that puts the province's health ahead of individuals' desires. If the school accepted only the highest scoring applicants then it would quickly fill its seats with people from the GTA, Montreal, etc because that is where the greatest concentrations of people are. Thus, there would be much less room for maritimers and the province could quickly be beset by hard times. Lastly, regional preferences are certainly not "as unfair as it gets". I would argue that preferences along racial and gender lines would be far worse and have no effective basis when it came to eventual post graduation.
  49. 9 points
    Please please please PLEASE don't take unpaid articles this early. Some provinces are imposing a minimum wage salary for articling students. Ontario is slow to do this. It doesn't mean you need to do this yet. do not do this out of desperation. If you really want this specific articling experience because it's in the very specific niche you're hoping to work in later, then think really really hard whether it's worth it. The presumption should be it's not worth it, especially at this stage. You have value and worth. Don't forget that.
  50. 9 points
    Christ. People try to help you and this is the response. I shall be concise: Terrible LSAT. Mediocre GPA. 1% at a Canadian law school. 90% at a UK law school and a long, difficult road that will be impeded by your horrible attitude.
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