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Showing content with the highest reputation since 04/08/21 in all areas

  1. 50 points
    There's a move on this forum that leaves me utterly infuriated and I've never been able to explain why until now. Some know-it-all student, probably still applying to law school, says some stupid things and received appropriate and predictable responses to being stupid. Then they turn around on the people replying to them - mainly lawyers, and students well into becoming lawyers - and say something like "you're a loser for even hanging around here as long as you have, so why would I want to listen to you?" I've never really probed why this bothers me so much, because the accusation itself doesn't insult me. Some dumb kid thinks I'm a loser? Probably I am - though not for reasons he or she thinks. You should see how I really waste my free time. And the logical fallacy in this response is also frustrating but also amusing. "I wouldn't want advice from anyone who is such a big loser they would spend any time offering me advice." It's a close variation on "I wouldn't want to join any club that would have me as a member." This isn't really what infuriates me either. But it's a step I needed to finally find it. What infuriates me is that the student offering that reply, by obvious extension, imagines their future success in some different way. They don't just want money, and power and some big imagined job in a big imagined tower that resembles whatever they've seen on some big, ridiculous television show. They want all that and then they want to stop interacting at all with all the losers and little people they've left behind in the lesser world. Because what kind of loser, once they have money and power and professional success, would even talk with some random student to help them? This realization has made me start thinking about what "success" looks like to law students, would-be law students, and I suppose young lawyers as well. I'm not against material success and even power. You aspire to being a partner at a large firm? Good for you. Some of my friends are exactly that. But outside of that role, what do you imagine your life looks like? Do you spend all the rest of your time acquiring art and talking about the shameful service you received from your Lexus dealership? I mean, is that really what you aspire to? I'm coming to the sad realization that really is what a fair portion of students want. Not to say they want to be snobs and elitists necessarily. More that they want to make a lot of money and lead a lifestyle well-removed from everyone who doesn't have money, but with a healthy sense of noblesse oblige still intact. So they'll donate to appropriate charities and sit on a Board and all that. And probably they won't try to defund public health care or public education - though God knows they'll use private health care any time they need it and wouldn't dream of sending their own children to anything other than an exclusive private school. Is that what this career is for, for you? I mean, honestly. I know those people are out there. I know some of them, and I've met a lot others. I guess they were all students at some point. I just imagined they...I don't know. Turned into that somehow. It never occurred to me before now that's what they always wanted. That success, for them, means getting away from everyone else. And maybe they need to spend some time here, on this forum, as students, learning how to get the money and the power. But as soon as they have it they're gone, and can't even understand anyone else who'd willingly hang around an online slum with people who don't have those things. Anyway, I could go on at greater length for myself. But the greatest extent of my aspiration to material wealth and exclusivity is that I like being able to order a double burger at Harvey's instead of a single any time I want, and the only math I'm doing involves calories and not cost difference. I like going to Cineplex VIP movies. Good value for the money - back when we went to movies at all. I've gotten damn used to driving, I admit. I used to like riding the bus in nice weather at least. I doubt I'd enjoy it anymore. But I don't want to get away from the people in a fast food restaurant, or in a movie theatre, or even on a bus. They're fucking people. That's the world. Take all the real people out of society and there IS no society. What the hell does anyone think they're trying to climb to the top of anyway? I'll stop now. This thread may not be about "success" at all. I can understand people who want money, power, even privilege. I just can't understand anyone who sees the ultimate end goal of acquiring those things to be isolating themselves from the sordid reality of ordinary life.
  2. 49 points
    Heh. You want to know what success looks like for me? Walking into a courtroom, introducing myself to counsel, and having them greet me warmly and say something like "You might not remember me, but six years ago when I was a student we went for a coffee and you told me all about that manslaughter case with the alternate suspect." And all of a sudden the file I'm doing becomes an interaction between colleagues who like each other, who are going to be courteous and professional and communicative. That coffee six years ago paid off. It came full circle. And we'll go get a second coffee and catch up and I've just improved the whole microcosm of a system I'm working in that particular week. It doesn't start happening for a few years. But more and more I realize how everyone is connected. More and more the - I don't know - 30? 40? or so students and young lawyers I've given a damn about some time in the misty past are full fledged counsel now, happy to see me, happy to work together. That's the best, for me. That's my version of success.
  3. 49 points
    Just gonna grab some popcorn before this thread pops off 👀
  4. 36 points
    I am confused. If you are planning on attending Osgoode, why didn’t you firmly accept? You would be freeing up spots for people hoping to attend Queen’s. Unless you provisionally accepted only to see whether or not you would be accepted to Queen’s - though I highly doubt anyone would be that selfish.
  5. 35 points
    Might also be worth thinking about why these large firms are so desperate to hire, and why so many are leaving these firms.
  6. 34 points
    Woah, I'm shook! Got accepted via email. cGPA: 2.96 LSAT: 161 filled in part B. I have been lurking here throughout the whole process and wanted to thank everyone for posting (even though I haven't myself). Good Luck everyone! 😁
  7. 33 points
    Whichever law school I attend will have the specialty of me being a student there.
  8. 31 points
    ooh la la lookit mr double-burger car-driving cineplex VIP with his fancy reclining seat still has time for the plebes
  9. 30 points
    I’m really sorry to have upset you, honestly. I think many ask these questions because a main purpose of posting on these forums is to provide fellow applicants with information on admissions, statistics, chances etc. The category of someone’s application can have a big impact on their chances. Personally, I asked because I have similar stats (with quite a lower lsat) so I was curious if we applied in the same category. I’m just trying to get a better understanding of where I may need to make improvements on my application in case I get rejected from all schools. I didn’t mean to do it at you expense. Best of luck moving forward.
  10. 30 points
    I never thought I would be posting in Osgoode's accepted thread BUT here I am! Accepted yesterday (April 15th). cGPA: 3.4 LSAT: 162 Filled out part B. Last year I was on the verge of giving up and now here I am with an Osgoode offer 😌 I hope my low cGPA gives hope to others in the same boat.
  11. 30 points
  12. 29 points
    It matters to me, a non-big law articling student who's treating this thread like an episode of Suits. Don't make me wait until next week to find out if Goodmans is doing a full hireback!
  13. 29 points
    Making this about Ryerson at all is a distraction to the main point. You're asking why create more seats in law school. Which is perhaps a fair question, but it could be about any newer law program, as Hegdis has pointed out, or about any expansion in existing programs, such as Ottawa's fairly recent increase in class size. So, what you're really asking is, how many seats in law school are enough? How many graduating law students should there be? And of course I have my own opinions on the matter, but without even pushing them heavily at this time, of course there are legitimate arguments to be made for more vs. less. For both sides of that discussion. If you imagine there cannot be, then that is definitely you losing perspective. If you want to hear the most compelling argument for more vs. less, here it is. That's that you aren't as special as you think you are. And neither am I. It's that the legal profession, like any other profession, is not and should not be exempt from competition and from market forces. I mean, that's really the concern lurking behind your belief that we don't need more graduating law students, right? Because it's already hard for some of us to find jobs. Well, it's good for us if there aren't many lawyers looking for work, but it's bad for people who employ lawyers - both individually and institutionally. And a basic understanding of markets and competition will obviously prove that. My own feelings on this subject are complicated, and do not fall entirely on one side or the other. But if you cannot see how or why there are valid arguments to say the legal profession should not be completely protected from competition, and that employment need not be guaranteed for all law graduates, then again, that's because you lack perspective. Repeat after me. Lawyers are not special. No more so than any other professional on the marketplace. Get over yourself. And good luck.
  14. 27 points
    Oh - oh no OP. I know your whole approach is to be super prepared and that is what has gotten you this far. But really - really - you don’t need to study for 1L. MUCH better advice is this: make a dentist appointment. Update your prescriptions - glasses, meds. Get some photos of family / friends developed and framed to take with you. Buy yourself a basic navy suit with a white collar shirt with appropriate shoes. Wear it a couple times and learn how to wash and iron the shirt. If you live at home and are moving out, go through your stuff. Donate your clothes and whatever junk you won’t use again. Box up what you want to keep, label it. Make a nice dinner for your parents and thank them for everything they have done. Draft a resume. In a year or so you will be glad you did. Those dates and names fade fast. You will need a foundation for your professional resume soon enough and having it done to date now helps a lot. Future you will thank you. Other than that, relax, read, get outdoors. Learn to cook a couple simple meals and rip the tags off your suit. Wear in your dress shoes a little bit. Be proud of who you are, where you come from, how you got here. Resolve to give yourself and everyone else a break come September when the anxious and smug overcompensate. Look forward. And well done.
  15. 26 points
    Accepted today, notified via email. 3.33 CGPA and 163 LSAT. My first acceptance in 3 years of applications.
  16. 24 points
    I never thought I would go out my way to make an account. However, I got accepted April 15th but I got an email on April 16th! Glory to God I’m still so shocked. GPA (OLSAS): 3.82 LSAT: 143 August, 150 January I had regular extra-curriculars and volunteering no research student or doing social justice work in Africa loool. I been following this forum all application process nervous I wouldn’t get anywhere with such a low LSAT, but I am here to testify that God knew my story and got me in. If you are feeling discouraged, please believe you have put all the work in and trust that he will do the rest just depend on him and ask for his guidance. The tears, frustration, anxiety and fear it’s all over now. I also got into Western but I’ll be accepting Osgoode. Best wishes to the rest!
  17. 23 points
    Not to pick on you, but this is an excellent example of why @albertabean's suggestion regarding more diverse adcomms, and why U of T's recent decision to launch the Black Student Application Process, are so essential. It's okay to be uncomfortable when reading or hearing racial slurs. Most people are. And often, when black or other minority writers use racial slurs, it's supposed to make you uncomfortable. But your job as an adcomm member is to look past the discomfort you feel and consider the actual merits of the application and the reason the applicant chose to outline that particular experience. To say that it is never appropriate to use a racial slur in a personal statement—let alone to issue a blanket prohibition on referring to the slur, doing anything remotely close to referring to the slur, or "danc[ing] around" the slur—is incredibly problematic. To go so far as to say you would oppose a qualified applicant's admission solely because they refer to a racial slur is only more so (and that's without getting into your suggestion that discussing difficult topics head on is indicative of a lack of cleverness). A lot of good personal statements are going to talk about things that make you uncomfortable. That might be racial slurs, but it also might be other "mature" topics, such as sexual assault, child abuse, or one's experience in refugee camps. And while good applicants will use those experiences to demonstrate positive qualities—such as resilience or a desire to positively alter social institutions—they're also going to have to actually address those situations in order to do so effectively. The reason it's inadvisable for OP to include racial slurs in their personal statement is because, unfortunately, some adcomm members are going to draw this type of negative inference or are otherwise going to be unable to read past their discomfort. And the stakes for the individual are sufficiently high that it's not worth the risk, even though the problem is truly with the adcomm who is rendered so uncomfortable by the relation of someone's lived experience that they are unable to do their job.
  18. 22 points
    My award is convincing a bunch of post-millennials (what are you all now, Gen Z?) to use what is effectively bulletin board software from the 90's. Checkmate.
  19. 22 points
    Ugh you are in the running as one of the worst posters on this forum.
  20. 20 points
    I don't think you should apologize. The purpose of these forums is to provide others with some insight into what is being accepted and what is being rejected. If a person posts here they should be prepared to be asked these questions and provide answers. Of course if they chose not to that's fine, but to be upset at someone for asking questions that this website is designed for is uncalled for, regardless of how upset they may be. This is a high pressure time for everyone, months of waiting, dealing with a pandemic so showing some empathy and kindness is needed ( you personally went above and beyond for apologizing though for certain you didn't need to).
  21. 20 points
    This is complete bullshit and an incredibly insular perspective that is totally ignorant of what most people's lives are like.
  22. 20 points
    Let's maybe, just maybe, react to people with a little more kindness. It's been a less than ideal year let alone admission cycle and people are just trying to figure out where they stand. With that being said, people will post their waitlists when they arrive/when they want to so I'm sure it'll be soon!
  23. 20 points
    It's entirely possible. I am a solo solicitor by day, and in the evenings I lose a lot of money trying to day trade cryptocurrencies.
  24. 19 points
    You know, it always comes across as dickish any time you quarrel on any level with diversity, inclusion, etc. But you can't logically have this both ways. If Ryerson is admitting students who, for whatever reason, would not otherwise be given an opportunity to attend law school and by doing so are expanding diversity then okay, let's talk about that. But for that to be true, these students would need to be applicants who weren't admitted anywhere else. The issue behind all of these wonderful assertions about how Ryerson isn't applying lower standards - just different and more inclusive standards - is that it relies on the belief that the admissions committee at Ryerson is just better at identifying a strong law student and future lawyer than, well, anyone else anywhere trying to do that. And frankly, that's a hell of a claim. Say what you want about other law schools and their priorities - I cannot imagine anyone would disagree that they are all at least trying to find the best class of law students they can find. Different schools have different entrance criteria based on differing (though similar) philosophies around how to identify a likely candidate. So yes, there's room for a range of opinion. But the bottom line is this. If Ryerson admits a student that no one else would have admitted, it means either (a) they've admitted a student who would have been too weak to get into any law school previous to opening this new one, or else (b) it's because Ryerson's admissions committee is smarter and better at this than anyone else in Canada. You can choose to believe any of these options, and I'm not here to argue with you. But I'm tired of people trying to have it all ways. It isn't like other schools fail to recognize the value of diversity, of trying to account for different backgrounds, etc. Every school claims and tries to do that. So what's going on at Ryerson? Are they admitting weaker candidates, or are they magically better at this than anyone else anywhere, or...what's the third option? It's an interesting discussion. It's an important discussion. It's a valid discussion. But let's at least have the discussion properly. Because pretending there's some way to have it all is just intellectually dishonest.
  25. 19 points
    I'll admit I started feeling some imposter syndrome already creeping in when I saw some of the really cool backgrounds of other applicants. Then I decided to nip that in the bud right away. The admissions committee decided that, based on what I provided them, I am ready for law school. You are too, and that's that.
  26. 18 points
  27. 18 points
    It honestly doesn't' seem so stressful, maybe you guys are just dumb
  28. 17 points
    You want to take away the one COVID activity I have left?
  29. 17 points
    I went into queue on December 23rd. I have aged 43 years since then.
  30. 17 points
    I don't think it's appropriate to be questioning the validity of people's [email protected] has a long posting history on this site and certainly has demonstrated reasons to receive accommodations.
  31. 17 points
    I came to Canada in my 22-y-o with a oversea bachelor's degree, to pursue a master's degree. I use my Chinese name only not a European one. I don't know a single rule of hockey. I am actually a new immigrant with poor English. But Canadian law schools still embraced me with offers and I'm going to pay (I will enroll this September) domestic tuition as a PR student, though I'm not a Canada citizen. I think it's the greatness of Canada and Canadian law school. I am not there yet but I feel super optimistically.
  32. 17 points
    I believe in taking care of myself, in a balanced diet, in a rigorous exercise routine. In the morning, if my face is a little puffy, I'll put on an icepack while doing my stomach crunches. I can do a thousand now. After I remove the icepack, I use a deep-pore cleanser lotion. In the shower, I use a water-activated gel cleanser, then a honey-almond bodyscrub, and on the face, an exfoliating gel-scrub. Then I apply an herb mint facial masque, which I leave on for ten minutes while I prepare the rest of my routine. I always use an aftershave lotion with little or no alcohol, because alcohol dries your face out and makes you look older. Then moisturizer, then an anti-aging eye balm, followed by a final moisturizing protective lotion.
  33. 16 points
  34. 15 points
    Update: I found a paying job at an international human rights law organization (UN organization). No mind-numbing boredom for me this summer.
  35. 15 points
    Welp, as the person who has wasted THE MOST TIME HERE AND IS THEREFORE THE MOST PATHETIC I can make an educated guess that this thread is done for. OP, search for "school rankings". There's a lot of past threads to peruse.
  36. 15 points
    UofA students gain a +10 buff to elemental resistance.
  37. 15 points
    I'm still deciding whether I want to go to law school or work full-time beforehand. I don't want to make a firm commitment to Osgoode until I am sure that law school is what I really want to do right now (especially since it's likely that the courses will be online in the Fall and I really struggled with pandemic online school during my final year of undergrad). Also, I don't think it's really your place to judge my reason for provisionally accepting a school. I'm not responsible for what Queens decides to do with other people that applied, it's not like they've even made a decision on my file yet, so you can't say that I'm being selfish for waiting to see what their decision is. I put a lot of effort into my applications, and if I decide to re-apply to law school after working for a while it would be useful to know what the different law schools decided based on the information I submitted.
  38. 14 points
    Take your LSAT before asking for chances. Also, why is this relevant?
  39. 14 points
    I don’t want to veer off the topic of the thread too much but I just wanted to say this is such a strong pool of candidates so far! Honestly I hope none of you get distraught about this as much I initially did. Hopefully this is just a temporary setback and we all hear good news soon! Perhaps if this was any other cycle, we would’ve likely been admitted already! If others try to justify why you haven’t been admitted by supposing that your ECs aren’t good or you aren’t holistic enough, don’t listen to them too much! That’s what they always say to try to make sense of all of this but the truth is that the world is often chaotic and not everything has to make sense. We just pick up our bearings and move forward! All the best!
  40. 14 points
  41. 14 points
    You came to the wrong neighbourhood, son.
  42. 14 points
    My current study schedule as a burnt out 2L: 9:30-11am-ish - wake up, doom scroll 11:30ish - open outline on one tab while reading news and complaining about how I have no motivation 12:37-2pmish - actual studying gets done 2-3pm - oh i did real work I deserve a break 5:27pm - oh i didn't get back to studying after that break. Well, it's 5pm and i should practice self care by taking the night off 11:27pm - "tomorrow I will study for real" repeat
  43. 14 points
    GOT REJECTED LAST YEAR AND NOW I GOT WAITLISTED. LETS GO! I’m just so happy to hear back from them honestly, I wasn’t really expecting to get in seeing how competitive it was this year. Waitlisted at 11:44am MT too! L2 GPA - 3.85~3.9 LSAT: Cancel, 151, 158 Completed the diversity section related to my ethnicity. Not mature applicant. ECs (ofc subjective, but I did fill out all 10 spots): Mental Health Worker (CMHA), Piano instructor, Volunteer coordinator, Government EI Officer, Swim/Lifeguard instructor, Editor They told me that they aren’t in a position to provide offers? I am still assuming this is what they tell everyone and they waitlisted me because I’m lacking in an area to be accepted and from what I thought, we still have spots left. Also, they have not accepted any regular candidates under LSAT 160 so not expecting acceptance. But so happy to get some closure ps. Thanks for everyone on this forum, I don’t have friends/connections in law so this group has been very supportive.
  44. 14 points
    Neither of your usernames strike confidence in me that either of you would know.
  45. 13 points
    It's interesting that you associate the "loser" label to the economically disadvantaged. I'm sure that's a piece of it, but I primarily associate the "loser" label to a form of anti-intellectualism; the kind where you do not want to be (or seen to be) the nerd, the geek, the anorak, the teacher's pet, the studious, the conscientious. Instead, you want to be the cool kid, who's popular, famous, wanted, wealthy, and somewhat exclusive -- but in a Mean Girls kind of way. It may seem strange, but there are a class of people who try to stay close-minded, because they associate knowledge or inclusivity with social shame. It's a world view that they adopted in school, and it stays with them as young adults. In that world, if you're someone who is going out of your way to offer advice to some random person on the internet, then you're just that geek kid from high school who got the high grades and is now a lawyer wanting to help other people. You're a loser. Sure most people eventually learn that that's not true at all and they grow out of it, but many undergrads aren't there yet. It seems to me that even if you come from an economically disadvantaged background, nothing precludes you from wanting others to also do better. In fact, in my experience people who were highly economically disadvantaged are also the most altruistic, because they know the value of giving a helping hand. With these clowns, there appears to be an additional element of "I want to be exclusive in my success, because then I'm cool and you're not" and "I want to hear from you, but not if you're a loser [scoff] [puke]", which leads me to think that they don't just want money, power, a big imagined job in a big imagined tower, and leave behind the lesser world. They also want the bragging rights of being "cool"; and in their immature unsophisticated minds, you get bragging rights the same way you got bragging rights in high school. I don't completely blame them for having this attitude. If you look at any legal show, the successful lawyer is depicted as that "cool" kid from high school. The Harvey Specter character: handsome, good with women, wanted, kind of exclusive, aloof, narcissistic, and rabidly individualistic. It confirms the notion that professional success looks very similar to teenage social success. Of course, what they don't realise is that geek is sitting across the table interviewing them. TL; DR: It's probably more to do with immaturity than corrosive individualism.
  46. 13 points
    I hate to break it to you, but considering your post history explicitly and repeatedly identifies your school it seems unlikely you can preserve that aspect of your anonymity
  47. 13 points
    @McGillObama I find your posts a little concerning here and not for the reasons others have rightly pointed out, or even the comments you made about intelligence and lawyers, etc. It concerns me that you may be going to law school with beliefs and value systems that are quite narrow-minded and judgmental. Look, I don't care how intelligent you are. I really don't. I care about whether you are unbiased and objective enough to treat your peers well, participate intelligently in law school classes and legal clinics, and be the kind of person a client would want to have as their lawyer. Leaving your academic intelligence aside, your emotional intelligence is clearly lacking right now (and it's ok if you are young and inexperienced as I am assuming you are now). You come across as someone that would be quick to jump to irrational conclusions and not act in the best interests of your clients as you have all these pre-conceived notions about people and different communities. I'm not really knocking you down here. Take this as advice and an opportunity to learn. Many of the law students and lawyers here had similar values and belief systems as you before they (we) went to law school and starting practicing in the real world. Think about the fact that as a lawyer, you will likely be servicing very real, ordinary, average intelligence people in most cases, and what kind of person you want to be when acting in their interests, and how you want to carry out your responsibilities and proceed through life. Seriously, who the fuck cares about this law vs. physics, lawyer innate intelligence, etc. BS. This shit doesn't concern me at all in the real world. As someone going to law school wanting to be a lawyer, you need to let go of your preconceived notions and biases of what being a lawyer entails, and be more open-minded and willing to interact with people and communities that are different from you. This will take you a lot farther in life than your biochemistry degree, your IQ, how many publications you have, and so on. The fact that you are in the process of going to law school, yet lingering on what your high school peers are doing and what their grades in high school may have been, is quite alarming. You do not want to carry this personality into law school because it reeks of toxicity and negativity. I can assure you that even if you were a law school medalist, I would not want to be your friend. And your peers will remember who you were during your time there when you all graduate and go out into the real world. So please, for your own sake, be kind and gentle to yourself and others, and go into law school with a little more respect for your peers, and openness to learning from others and about their different experiences and value systems. I wish you good luck in your future endeavours.
  48. 13 points
  49. 13 points
    I have not read your other posts on this topic, so forgive me if I am repeating something that has already been said. Why are you so intent on pursuing a legal career when you don't want to deal with any of the baggage? As a lawyer, you deal with other people's problems. Those problems do not exclusively arise between 9-5, Monday to Friday. Any reasonably conscientious lawyer or law firm will expect you to respond to client issues as they arise, whenever that may be. There is also a duty to not abandon your clients just because something came up out of your designated work hours. That is part of the job, especially early in your career when you have much less control over your schedule. If those terms are fundamentally unacceptable to you, then maybe you should not go to law school. It's like wanting to be a pilot but insisting that your schedule should not deviate from the 9-5 standard. I'm sure there are some rare pilot jobs that would give you that, but as a general expectation it is completely unrealistic. When you become a pilot, you're accepting that you will be working long, odd hours, and will have an irregular schedule. From the comments I've gleaned that you're in your second year of undergrad. That is way too early to be thinking about your work schedule as a lawyer. My best advice: get a job. Any job. Preferably an internship in an office. Gain some office experience. See what works for you. Also, consider delaying law school until a few years after undergrad. You won't put yourself at a disadvantage by doing this; a lot of people enter law school after a few years of work. Use it to save some money, gain perspective, and solidify your professional ambitions. It would benefit you a lot.
  50. 13 points
    Can confirm. Started dating a classmate in orientation week. Wedding date is booked. It's a slippery slope.
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