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AlpacaWhisperer

Taking September 2018, Chances for 2019 admission?

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Hi all! Thanks in advance for helping me out :)

Preface:

I am currently a 3rd year student, and will be finishing up school in 2 more semesters (done my degree in April 2019). I did the June 2018 LSAT and scored a 159. My undergrad grades are still coming in, (10 more courses left) but my average is around a 83% without drops and 85% with drops. I am retaking the September LSAT in hopes of getting 165+. 

Question:

How do my chances look currently with my 159 and cGPA for UBC? Would it help immensely if I scored a 165+ on the september LSAT? 

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The median LSAT score for UBC Law is 166 if I recall correctly, although you are slightly above the median GPA with drops of 83%. Based off the deviation from the median LSAT, I think it will be difficult. 

http://lsutil.azurewebsites.net/UBC/Predict

The above calculator gives an index score. Now with that said, there are reasons to doubt it is the actual index score that will be used by admissions ( the office has stated that the formula is not the correct one). However, it does function to help us compare to people admitted and rejected on this websites threads, as they all likely used this formula to deduce their index scores. It might not be the exact formula, but I would not be surprised if our actual index scores are similar. Your index score as predicted by the formula would be low at 90.94, the last post in the accepted thread this year off the waitlist is 91.38. In 2017 the very last person posting in the accepted thread on Aug 21st had an index score of 90.97. 

With all that being said, you can definitely get into a Canadian law school. You have a great GPA and a decent LSAT. If you got a 165 you would 100% get admitted to UBC Law. Even if you don't score the 165, you can still get into a Canadian law school.

 

Best of Luck!

 

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