Jump to content
ljlife

Test de Francais International

Recommended Posts

Hi, 

I have a couple simple questions regarding the TFI test that anglophones have to take to get accepted to Quebec's civil law schools.

1) Do all civil law schools require passing the test? 

2) Do you take the test once you are accepted (conditional acceptance) or are you supposed to take it before you apply (like the LSAT)?

3) How difficult is the test? I'm an anglophone but i've lived in Montreal my whole life. I struggle with speaking and writing without making mistakes, but I understand the language almost perfectly. How much preparation is recommended? 

Thanks for the help! :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
36 minutes ago, ljlife said:

Hi, 

I have a couple simple questions regarding the TFI test that anglophones have to take to get accepted to Quebec's civil law schools.

1) Do all civil law schools require passing the test? 

2) Do you take the test once you are accepted (conditional acceptance) or are you supposed to take it before you apply (like the LSAT)?

1.)

- No , Ottawa's civil law programs doesnt require applicants to pass the french exam they administer ( although they don't use the TFI )

2.) 

- Yes, you'll be conditionally accepted into the program pending a  passing grade on the test . 

I didn't address the third question as I've never written the exam and only have anecdotal evidence to back my opinions of the test. that being said , a friend of mine who graduated from concordia's languages programs found the test difficult because its fast paced in that your not given a lot of time to reflect on the questions( she ultimately failed) . 

Finally , you seem to be in the same position i was in when i was applying( language wise) , therefore , i would suggest avoiding the whole TFI fiasco and applying to U of O if you can afford it . Ottawa gives you the opportunity to study in french while also being able to write your exams and assignments in english. however , U of O isn't an escape route by any means . you'll be behind the eight ball in that you'll be constantly thinking in english while your being taught  in french . furthermore ( i speak from experience) you're in class notes might become a garbled mess and you'll need rely on recordings to make ends  meet. 

UDEM and the like  expect relatively high level of french proficiency , and while they offer french courses , i wasn't ready to risk everything and bet that id improve enough to succeed in the program. 

Best of luck 

Edited by lawgic1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.



  • Recent Posts

    • How's everyone holding up after two days? This feels more tiring than the 2L process for some reason. 
    • So you are against uvic's JID?
    • Hi everyone, I'm currently doing my undergraduate degree in a co-op program and am considering applying to law school. I was reading the U of T Law School Admissions website and came across this:  Our review of an applicant's undergraduate record is based on the principle that undergraduate records should be compared as fairly as possible across applicants. For this reason, we examine the pattern of the intensity of the course work taken across an applicant's undergraduate career (light versus heavy, full-time versus part-time, co-op versus regular, introductory versus upper-year courses, courses on exchange, courses during the summer term). I have a couple questions about this: 1. What is the reasoning for differentiating between regular and co-op programs? Does this mean students in co-op programs are at an inherent disadvantage in admissions? 2. Regarding summer courses, I assume U of T looks at them differently because they are sometimes accelerated or easier than those during the fall and winter terms.  Because I am in a co-op program, I am forced to do a summer term with a full course load. These courses are the same length and difficulty as the rest of my courses. Will U of T put less weight on my grades in these courses simply because they are "courses during the summer term"? If anyone has any information that can help answer these questions that would be a huge help for me. Thanks in advance.
    • Any insight into what it is like to article with them or what the salary is like?
    • That might not be a good idea. Copyright. 
×