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Abclaw2018

Worried B- student

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So I have a B- average at an Ontario law school that is not Osgoode/U of T and I was wondering what my chances were for OCI. I'm planning on applying to like ~20 firms, both large and mid sized in Toronto. 

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Posted (edited)
24 minutes ago, Abclaw2018 said:

So I have a B- average at an Ontario law school that is not Osgoode/U of T and I was wondering what my chances were for OCI. I'm planning on applying to like ~20 firms, both large and mid sized in Toronto. 

You're only applying to 20? Maybe 1-3 OCIs at most. Your grades are not competitive for most firms participating in the OCI process. Work on improving your grades in 2L and getting some relevant experience so you can market yourself well in the articling recruit (employers tend to be small/mid-sized firms for the most part here, so a demonstrated interest in their practice area/s is necessary to secure interviews). 

Edited by Simbaa

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1-3/20 is generous with a B- average. A B student might get 1-3/20 if the student applies broadly. 

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Posted (edited)

Your chances aren't good, but I don't think that should stop you from applying to whichever firms you want to work at. 

Edited by Trew
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Where do you rank in your class? And what school is this? 

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11 hours ago, Abclaw2018 said:

So I have a B- average at an Ontario law school that is not Osgoode/U of T and I was wondering what my chances were for OCI. I'm planning on applying to like ~20 firms, both large and mid sized in Toronto. 

Apply much more broadly. Once you have a template application it is relatively easy to dramatically increase the number of applications. If you don’t do it now you may be doing it later and now is better. 

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Posted (edited)
12 hours ago, Abclaw2018 said:

So I have a B- average at an Ontario law school that is not Osgoode/U of T and I was wondering what my chances were for OCI. I'm planning on applying to like ~20 firms, both large and mid sized in Toronto. 

Most importantly: Don't let your grades discourage you. This is where tenacity and perseverance are the difference between the people who get down when the going gets tough and those the step into high gear. It is your choice which category you want to fall under. 

That being said I don't wanna be a debbie downer. But everything I've heard about the Ontario OCI market points back to a either B+ average and higher or alternatively a few As but no Cs.

I'd still apply broadly and more importantly to alot of firms. However, you may need to have a reality check. I don't think it is very likely you'll get a position with a big firm with below average marks, unless you absolutely hit it off with some important people through networking. I'd say your marks will likely preclude you from having much if any success in a 2L OCI process with big bay street firms. But if you display legitimate interest through a good personal statement you may sneak into a few decent mid-sized firms (and there are many boutique firms that have remarkable talented counsel to learn) 

If you are super keen about getting work you may need to be a little creative with who you apply to and where. You may find looking in smaller markets or outside Toronto yields alot more opportunity many other students will not be chasing. 

Best of luck, and hold in there. 

Edited by Dreamer89
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Thanks everyone for your feedback. I'll end up applying more broadly to increase my chances. I realize I have a very slim chance but it's better than not applying at all 

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6 minutes ago, Abclaw2018 said:

Thanks everyone for your feedback. I'll end up applying more broadly to increase my chances. I realize I have a very slim chance but it's better than not applying at all 

I applied to a recruit which I thought I had no business applying to. I got interviews, and am somehow still in the running for two in-firms. Don't count yourself out until you hear a no (if it's really what you want).

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57 minutes ago, Abclaw2018 said:

Thanks everyone for your feedback. I'll end up applying more broadly to increase my chances. I realize I have a very slim chance but it's better than not applying at all 

The market is good right now. Be positive...get out there and make it happen. 

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Definitely apply. Worse that can happen is you get no interviews. But at least there’s a chance that a firm looks at your resume and decides they want to talk to you.

It happens sometimes, but manage your expectations with the understanding that there’s a big chance you will have to look to firms not participating in the organized recruit to get a summer job. 

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Was a B- student, got 5/40 interviews, currently a summer student at a downtown toronto firm

 

bit of an upward battle, but it seems possible and definitely don’t go into Interviews with that mentality 

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Posted (edited)

In 1L I was a B student with several B+ but no A's, and one C+ and one D+. I have an MA and 2 years of unique work experience.

I got four 2L OCI with big Bay Street firms

I am going to be articling at a national firm on Bay

My advice to other B-range students is pretty standard but it worked for me: Apply very broadly, network, cold-email, market yourself well, don't be afraid to admit to yourself that you want a big and/or prestigious firm (if that is what you want) and keep persevering

Edited by Disputes
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To OP (and others) never count yourself out of an interview! You have NO IDEA what recruiters are looking for. Why would you NOT apply? You're making a cover letter for other firms anyway, why not throw a cover letter at a firm. Don't apply to firms where you have absolutely no demonstrable interest in their practice area, but apply broadly otherwise.

I never understand why a student with average/slightly below average marks would count themselves out without trying. Be realistic in your expectations but don't shoot yourself in the leg before the race even begins :@

*rant over

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