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Administrative Law: Course vs Module

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Osgoode's degree requirements state that administrative law is a requirement to graduate, however you do not have to take a graded for-credit course. It states that you can either take the course or do the non-graded online module that does not count for any credits, and that either of these satisfies the degree requirement. I am already enrolled in the Admin course for this upcoming year however, I am considering dropping it as there are more interesting courses I would rather take, which also fit better into my schedule. 

So I wanted to ask, has anyone taken the Admin law module? What was your experience, was it easy or hard? How long does it take? Can it be done any time of the year? 

Im having  trouble finding Info about this not for credit module on Osgoode's website, so naturally I have turned here.  

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I took it. It was not exciting but I find that you can pick up what you need in other contexts, and your time is valuable - do the online for admin (and I wish I had done it for bizass) and save your class slots for more interesting things. Like estates. Man, I wish I had taken estates.

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Posted (edited)

I was originally going to do the admin law module, but then elected to do the course. As dry and boring as it was I am really glad I did. Some employers will look for it, especially if you are planning on applying for any clerkships. 

 

EDIT: I should add, that the friends I have who elected to do the online module all said it was very straightforward and easy to get through in a couple of hours. It can be done at any time of year as long as it is before the end of your last term. If I were you, I would suggest doing it over a summer or during Christmas break. 

Edited by Lawtender33
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3 hours ago, ShortShrift said:

I took it. It was not exciting but I find that you can pick up what you need in other contexts, and your time is valuable - do the online for admin (and I wish I had done it for bizass) and save your class slots for more interesting things. Like estates. Man, I wish I had taken estates.

How did you do the module? Did you have to ask the school or is it just some link online? I can't seem to find anything. 

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I was going to do the online module but a couple of friends of mine suggested I should sit in the course and as dry as it was I’m happy that I took it because as it was stated earlier, it looks good on your transcript and it can help broaden your legal job prospects.  On the other hand, lots of my friends didn’t regret doing the module either.  Certainly depends also on the legal field you’d like to pursue.  

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I did the module. It is super short and you can knock it out in less than a day. But I don’t need admin law for work, so if you’re planning on doing something that’s related, you probably should take the course, if anything to demonstrate to employers that you’re serious. But outside of that, it’s not even useful for the bar. The materials will describe what you need to know and the exam only touches on it slightly. 

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7 hours ago, Ryn said:

I did the module. It is super short and you can knock it out in less than a day. But I don’t need admin law for work, so if you’re planning on doing something that’s related, you probably should take the course, if anything to demonstrate to employers that you’re serious. But outside of that, it’s not even useful for the bar. The materials will describe what you need to know and the exam only touches on it slightly. 

Might be a dumb question but I’ll shoot anyways, which practice areas generally favour the actual Admin Law course? I’m an incoming 1L with a preliminary interest in Tax (which might change when I take the course), but I wouldn't want to shoot myself in the foot by taking the module instead. Thanks.

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1 hour ago, FoG said:

Might be a dumb question but I’ll shoot anyways, which practice areas generally favour the actual Admin Law course? I’m an incoming 1L with a preliminary interest in Tax (which might change when I take the course), but I wouldn't want to shoot myself in the foot by taking the module instead. Thanks.

I can’t say for certain, and someone else might give you a much better answer, but employment law, securities, and immigration are the most immediate areas that come to mind. Any time you have to deal with a tribunal regularly, I would think, could benefit from having a good grasp on admin.

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1 hour ago, Ryn said:

I can’t say for certain, and someone else might give you a much better answer, but employment law, securities, and immigration are the most immediate areas that come to mind. Any time you have to deal with a tribunal regularly, I would think, could benefit from having a good grasp on admin.

Sounds like it’d be best to take the course to not close any doors. Thank you!

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My understanding is that if you took state & citizen this past school year (i.e. 2017/2018), you’re not required to take the admin law course or the module because state & citizen covered what is required for the degree. I think that’s also the case for incoming 1Ls.

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, Leviosaar said:

My understanding is that if you took state & citizen this past school year (i.e. 2017/2018), you’re not required to take the admin law course or the module because state & citizen covered what is required for the degree. I think that’s also the case for incoming 1Ls.

I would check with student services to confirm this before deciding to not take admin or complete the module. You don't want to be in a situation where you think you're all set to graduate, only to be informed that you haven't completed the requisite courses. 

I know that Business Associations is no longer a requirement and student services sent out several emails about it over the winter break period and months following. Nothing was said about Admin law. In fact, they still have it listed on their website (which has been updated to include the indigenous law requirement, and the removal of business associations) so it's more likely than not still a course you have to take. https://www.osgoode.yorku.ca/programs/jd-program/degree-requirements/

EDIT: NVM - Upon closer inspection it does say that this is a requirement for those who began in 2016 and earlier. Hmm I would talk to student services just to confirm unless you received some sort of email like we did for Business Associations. 

Edited by Lawtender33

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I don’t think there was an email or any sort of clear official communication to the students about this, which is definitely weird. But if you look in the document called “Transcript of Academic Advising Session” under Syllabus & Enrollment in MyOsgoode, Mya Rimon stated that the required admin law elements were covered in state & citizen and legal process for 1Ls in the 2017/2018 school year. 

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FWIW, I took the module and wish that I had taken the actual course. I assumed I wouldn't need it because I intended to practice general corporate law, but I encountered admin issues a number of times as a summer student and would have saved myself temporary confusion had I of taken the course and developed a better understanding of the material - instead of glossing over it in the module.

TLDR: its not required anymore but I would still take it.

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21 hours ago, Leviosaar said:

My understanding is that if you took state & citizen this past school year (i.e. 2017/2018), you’re not required to take the admin law course or the module because state & citizen covered what is required for the degree. I think that’s also the case for incoming 1Ls.

Problem is that I didn't take State and Citizen because i'm a 2L transfer. 

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