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TrevorPhilips

Should I withdraw from the LSAT?!

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So, I'm registered for the July LSAT which is this Monday and I've been prepping all summer. The scores for my last 5 PTs, latest one of which was today, have been 154, 155, 153, 154, and 154 and my highest score ever was 157. When I was writing the test today I thought I was killing it and didn't get the whole "I feel like I'm bombing this PT" feeling. But clearly, I was wrong. It's clear that I've plateaued in the mid 150s but now comes the question: should I withdraw and take the test in September/November when I'm getting better scores?

On the one hand, I've heard that law schools really don't like it when applicants repeatedly take the LSAT over and over with little improvement. So, if I write it once and do relatively poorly, I'm going to be expected to do much better the next time. But, the expectation isn't there if I write it once and get a solid score.

On the other hand, by taking the LSAT this Monday I will gain the experience of sitting in on a real test so when the time comes to write the second time, I wouldn't have the stress barrier hindering my performance since I'd have taken the real thing once before.

Does anyone know whether there is any truth to the whole "high expectation if taken repeatedly" argument? Will my application in fact be stronger if I have one solid score as opposed to one meager and one better mark? Or do you guys think it's better to just go ahead with it this Monday and take a second LSAT once again in November.

I'm going into my fourth year come September, so I would also be pretty occupied with law school applications and classes in general so wouldn't have time to study for the test every second of every day. 

Many thanks advance!

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6 minutes ago, TrevorPhilips said:

So, I'm registered for the July LSAT which is this Monday and I've been prepping all summer. The scores for my last 5 PTs, latest one of which was today, have been 154, 155, 153, 154, and 154 and my highest score ever was 157. When I was writing the test today I thought I was killing it and didn't get the whole "I feel like I'm bombing this PT" feeling. But clearly, I was wrong. It's clear that I've plateaued in the mid 150s but now comes the question: should I withdraw and take the test in September/November when I'm getting better scores?

On the one hand, I've heard that law schools really don't like it when applicants repeatedly take the LSAT over and over with little improvement. So, if I write it once and do relatively poorly, I'm going to be expected to do much better the next time. But, the expectation isn't there if I write it once and get a solid score.

On the other hand, by taking the LSAT this Monday I will gain the experience of sitting in on a real test so when the time comes to write the second time, I wouldn't have the stress barrier hindering my performance since I'd have taken the real thing once before.

Does anyone know whether there is any truth to the whole "high expectation if taken repeatedly" argument? Will my application in fact be stronger if I have one solid score as opposed to one meager and one better mark? Or do you guys think it's better to just go ahead with it this Monday and take a second LSAT once again in November.

I'm going into my fourth year come September, so I would also be pretty occupied with law school applications and classes in general so wouldn't have time to study for the test every second of every day. 

Many thanks advance!

What score do you need to get into the schools you are interested in? I think that will play a large role in your decision. You're plateaued in the mid 150s... but is that score good enough for the school you want to attend? Or do you need at least a 160? If it's the latter, I think you will likely have to study a bit more and retake. But remember, many people have done rewrites and have gotten accepted to the schools of their choice (myself included).

It's up to you whether you should write it on Monday or not. Either way, it will show up as a cancelled score on your LSAC report if you decide to cancel it now vs. cancelling it on test day. I'm also not sure how much the argument you mention holds up (someone correct me if I'm wrong). From what I know, most schools just look at your highest score and accept you based off that.

I think you should attend the test on Monday (for the experience at the very minimum) and decide whether you want to cancel it afterwards. You have a few days to decide whether you want to cancel your score so don't worry about having to cancel it right then and there. 

Hope that helps :) 

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I second the above advice - take the test on Monday. You've spent the money to register, and put in  many hours studying already. Even if a mid-150 score isn't enough to get you into the school you want to go to, you'll at least gain the experience of sitting the test.

I would also agree that your argument about LSAT re-writes might not hold up. With the exception of one or two schools that average LSAT grades, I don't think having a mediocre LSAT followed by an (improved) re-write would negatively impact your admission chances.

You mention you're worried about the time you'll have to study leading up to the November LSAT due to school and applications. What if despite your best efforts, the studying you were able to do leading up to the test date didn't help you overcome the mid-150 plateau you've reached? Wouldn't you wish you had written the LSAT in July and had been able to dedicate those hours in September-November to school and applications? 

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16 hours ago, LivePumpkin said:

What score do you need to get into the schools you are interested in? I think that will play a large role in your decision. You're plateaued in the mid 150s... but is that score good enough for the school you want to attend? Or do you need at least a 160? If it's the latter, I think you will likely have to study a bit more and retake. But remember, many people have done rewrites and have gotten accepted to the schools of their choice (myself included).

It's up to you whether you should write it on Monday or not. Either way, it will show up as a cancelled score on your LSAC report if you decide to cancel it now vs. cancelling it on test day. I'm also not sure how much the argument you mention holds up (someone correct me if I'm wrong). From what I know, most schools just look at your highest score and accept you based off that.

I think you should attend the test on Monday (for the experience at the very minimum) and decide whether you want to cancel it afterwards. You have a few days to decide whether you want to cancel your score so don't worry about having to cancel it right then and there. 

Hope that helps :) 

Hey! Thank you so much for taking the time to reply. I actually had completely forgot about the fact that most schools look at your best LSAT score, I guess what I heard is just a rumour. After thinking about it for a bit and realizing that most schools do look at your best score, I think I'm gonna go ahead and write on Monday, I mean I paid already so might as well right?

Also, if it helps, my top school is Osgoode then Western though in a perfect world where I had a stellar GPA and enough IQ points for a 165+ LSAT, UofT would be my first school.

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15 hours ago, BLD said:

I second the above advice - take the test on Monday. You've spent the money to register, and put in  many hours studying already. Even if a mid-150 score isn't enough to get you into the school you want to go to, you'll at least gain the experience of sitting the test.

I would also agree that your argument about LSAT re-writes might not hold up. With the exception of one or two schools that average LSAT grades, I don't think having a mediocre LSAT followed by an (improved) re-write would negatively impact your admission chances.

You mention you're worried about the time you'll have to study leading up to the November LSAT due to school and applications. What if despite your best efforts, the studying you were able to do leading up to the test date didn't help you overcome the mid-150 plateau you've reached? Wouldn't you wish you had written the LSAT in July and had been able to dedicate those hours in September-November to school and applications? 

Hey, thanks a bunch for replying! As I mentioned above, I think I will go ahead and write the test on Monday since the re-write argument may have been a rumour after all. 

On another note, would you happen to know which schools are the ones that average your LSAT score? 

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Posted (edited)

The multiple scores thing is more of an issue in the US, at least according to my American friends applying to US schools.

Edit: UofA averages. I’m not sure of any others.

Edited by Psychometronic
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Just U of A as far as I know as well.

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Don't cancel your score. Schools will still see you wrote twice and you will learn nothing about your performance. 

You can basically finish your applications this summer if you want to free up time to study in the fall. Let your references know you will be asking them now, and then send them the reference link as soon as OLSAS opens up for next cycle. Write your personal statement this month. You can tweak it/write additional sections for each school once OLSAS opens up. 

Regarding the test: spend your time on LG to get your score to -0 or as close to that mark as possible. This is possible. 

From my own experience, I was heading into a September write with a 159 under my belt, but that was with a ton of correct guesses in LG. I had been muddling through some large blue prep book on my own, and had no clue what I was doing. I met somebody who told me that I should withdraw from that session and write in December after perfecting LG. He also recommended that I try the LSAT trainer. I followed his advice and scored much higher than 159. 

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1 hour ago, TrevorPhilips said:

Hey, thanks a bunch for replying! As I mentioned above, I think I will go ahead and write the test on Monday since the re-write argument may have been a rumour after all. 

On another note, would you happen to know which schools are the ones that average your LSAT score? 

Queens averages the LSAT scores when they put applications in piles to be read in order from  highest stats to lowest stats. But once they get to your app they look at highest. So still worth writing and then retaking, because even though your file may get read later, if your second score is competitive you'll be fine

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7 hours ago, TrevorPhilips said:

Also, if it helps, my top school is Osgoode then Western though in a perfect world where I had a stellar GPA and enough IQ points for a 165+ LSAT, UofT would be my first school.

Don't limit yourself. You can get that 165! And if it makes you feel any better, I retook the test this past February and got into all schools I applied to in March so don't feel like you have to rush to do the fall tests if you aren't ready (though that would be ideal). PM if you need anymore help. 

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8 hours ago, easttowest said:

Don't cancel your score. Schools will still see you wrote twice and you will learn nothing about your performance. 

You can basically finish your applications this summer if you want to free up time to study in the fall. Let your references know you will be asking them now, and then send them the reference link as soon as OLSAS opens up for next cycle. Write your personal statement this month. You can tweak it/write additional sections for each school once OLSAS opens up. 

Regarding the test: spend your time on LG to get your score to -0 or as close to that mark as possible. This is possible. 

From my own experience, I was heading into a September write with a 159 under my belt, but that was with a ton of correct guesses in LG. I had been muddling through some large blue prep book on my own, and had no clue what I was doing. I met somebody who told me that I should withdraw from that session and write in December after perfecting LG. He also recommended that I try the LSAT trainer. I followed his advice and scored much higher than 159. 

My issue with LG is strictly time at this point. I have (near) perfect accuracy on the 3 games I attempt but I absolutely have no idea how else I can fire through the games faster than I already do. So I end up guessing on the last game. Do you have any last minute tips on improving my speed?

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1 hour ago, LivePumpkin said:

Don't limit yourself. You can get that 165! And if it makes you feel any better, I retook the test this past February and got into all schools I applied to in March so don't feel like you have to rush to do the fall tests if you aren't ready (though that would be ideal). PM if you need anymore help. 

Will do! Thanks a bunch :) 

Also, if you're cool with sharing, what school will you be attending this fall?

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On ‎17‎/‎07‎/‎2018 at 6:36 PM, TrevorPhilips said:

So, I'm registered for the July LSAT which is this Monday and I've been prepping all summer. The scores for my last 5 PTs, latest one of which was today, have been 154, 155, 153, 154, and 154 and my highest score ever was 157. When I was writing the test today I thought I was killing it and didn't get the whole "I feel like I'm bombing this PT" feeling. But clearly, I was wrong. It's clear that I've plateaued in the mid 150s but now comes the question: should I withdraw and take the test in September/November when I'm getting better scores?

On the one hand, I've heard that law schools really don't like it when applicants repeatedly take the LSAT over and over with little improvement. So, if I write it once and do relatively poorly, I'm going to be expected to do much better the next time. But, the expectation isn't there if I write it once and get a solid score.

On the other hand, by taking the LSAT this Monday I will gain the experience of sitting in on a real test so when the time comes to write the second time, I wouldn't have the stress barrier hindering my performance since I'd have taken the real thing once before.

Does anyone know whether there is any truth to the whole "high expectation if taken repeatedly" argument? Will my application in fact be stronger if I have one solid score as opposed to one meager and one better mark? Or do you guys think it's better to just go ahead with it this Monday and take a second LSAT once again in November.

I'm going into my fourth year come September, so I would also be pretty occupied with law school applications and classes in general so wouldn't have time to study for the test every second of every day. 

Many thanks advance!

Based only on the information you've provided, I think the general consensus advice is best and that you should write the test on Monday. I'm not entirely sure your score would improve in the fall if you have less time to prepare/study for the test. Also, PTs are not always 100% indicative of how you will perform on test day. This goes both ways as I've heard of people who have scored higher than their PTs, and others who have scored lower than their PTs.

And honestly, if you're past the point of a refund (not sure if that is the case or relevant to you) you might as well take the test and get the truest sense of test day conditions. Worst case you re-write later on with the only real impacts being on your wallet and potentially on your work/study/life balance for a part of your fourth year, or best case you smash it and have one huge item checked off on your way to law school acceptance.

good luck!

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