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Just to chime in again, 

Any chance you know what the salary progression is at the 70k firm? Do you convert to eat what you kill at some point, etc? I'm not really sure how PI works. 

And nobody here is ripping on 70k. You have multiple offers and the minimum if you play your cards right is 70k. Life is good. 70k in GTA is pretty solid (especially if you commute!)

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Relax, go with whichever firm you liked better. When you say things like your experience was ahead of the pack you can expect some ribbing because you’re taking yourself too seriously. You just articled. 

Edited by TrialPrep
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16 minutes ago, TrialPrep said:

Relax, go with whichever firm you liked better. When you say things like your experience was ahead of the pack you can expect some ribbing because you’re taking yourself too seriously. You just articled. 

/thread. 

 

What do you folks wanna argue about next? 

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I was really excited about my set date experience. It really helped me get confidence in court, learn to deal with fuckery that comes up a lot, and tell crown to go stuff it when they tried to pull a fast one on us (obviously not in that language).

 

...I was in 1L. 

 

But I'll say this much: OP you sure write a persuasive cover letter for anyone who doesn't know how set date court operates (and it seems to have worked!)

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Set-date court does open your eyes to the Chernobyl-level disaster that is our court administration system. You do gain a lot of advocacy experience arguing with court staff about mundane things like filing or not losing an Information, which most people would think would be standard form, but is often a fantastic adventure.

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OP, For context I have been practising criminal law for over a decade, and I agree with providence's take on this.

You got great experience as a student articling in criminal defence, doing exactly what most students who article in criminal defence do. It sets you in the path to being a competent litigator. 

I will simply add my voice to the chorus of “be careful not to oversell it”. Compared to some other articled students your experience may be superior, sure: but it’s not exceptional. When I read your posts here, having never met you, my reaction was the same as providence’s, herself an experienced defence lawyer. 

But congratulations on having an offer already. Fwiw I think you want to be wary of leveraging offers against each other. The market is flooded with new Calls looking for work. I recently hired some one, and in the course of interviewing applicants for the position at least one person tried touting their numerous offers. Since this made it clear to me that they weren’t really interested in the job but just in the pay check, I cut them loose.

Whatever you decide, I hope the next experience is as valuable as the first!

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17 hours ago, QuincyWagstaff said:

I don't think setting dates is significant experience, even if the Crown is unreasonable. Running bail hearings, doing sentencings, etc., that's substantive criminal experience. 

After you've run around setting dates for a week or two, I think you know the deal. 

 

While bail hearings and sentencings are obviously more substantial than setting dates, even experience setting dates is significant - because it brings you into court.  I gets you comfortable on your feet in a courtroom.  It teaches you to be fast on your feet.  It gets you known to the Crown and the local judges.

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I'd be very careful about selecting your first post-articling job solely on the basis of money.

Your first few years of practicing are most useful for helping to set you up for the rest of your career.  You want the job that is going to give you the experience doing the kind of work you want to keep on doing.  There's no point in taking a job in an area you hate because they're going to pay you an extra $5 or $10k per year.

As well - beware that with a bigger salary comes bigger expectations.  The more you are paid, the more you are expected to contribute right away.  Again, you want a job that sets you up for long-term success.

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27 minutes ago, Malicious Prosecutor said:

 

While bail hearings and sentencings are obviously more substantial than setting dates, even experience setting dates is significant - because it brings you into court.  I gets you comfortable on your feet in a courtroom.  It teaches you to be fast on your feet.  It gets you known to the Crown and the local judges.

Ok, it's not totally insignificant. 

However, if you've spent most of your articles running around setting dates 4 or 5 days a week, for 8 hours a day, I think you've got a raw deal. I've seen students doing this. 

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23 minutes ago, QuincyWagstaff said:

Ok, it's not totally insignificant. 

However, if you've spent most of your articles running around setting dates 4 or 5 days a week, for 8 hours a day, I think you've got a raw deal. I've seen students doing this. 

And if 90% of them turn in arguments requiring thinking on your feet and sending in the guy who is nice to the crowns, something is wrong. Going in there should be mostly routine if a firm is on top of their shit. 

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44 minutes ago, providence said:

And if 90% of them turn in arguments requiring thinking on your feet and sending in the guy who is nice to the crowns, something is wrong. Going in there should be mostly routine if a firm is on top of their shit. 

Speaking as a Crown who does his share of docket court appearances, some principals are much better than others about giving their students full and complete instructions on their files...

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