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pzabbythesecond

Competitive moot - not selected: forget about litigation?

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Title says it all. I'm pretty dumbfounded because it seemed like a strong try out. I'm not sure how many moots the school actually chose to participate in and how many people tried out, so that may have been why, but my school's administration doesn't care to release that information.

 

Now what? Forget about litigation? I have decent grades and an enrolled in some upper year litigation seminars. Should I bother applying to litigation boutiques? 

 

I may just be panicking. I don't know. Appreciate any and all advice. Thanks.

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Moot is not any sort of deal breaker for anyone.

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You came up short once and you're considering abandoning litigation? You are just panicking. Just use it as a learning experience and move forward.

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No, don’t give up on litigation! Moots are great for the resume but they are nothing like a real trial. 

Sorry you’re disappointed.

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I'm sorry you didn't get the moot you want; I can relate. But you're definitely panicking. Don't worry about it. I'd wager the vast majority of successful litigators have never done a moot.

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I'd say an upper-year seminar on a litigation related topic, or a clinic (if available), would be a fine substitute for a moot. Don't sweat it.

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Thanks everyone. I appreciate the help and support. A shitty day. But they're bound to happen. Just gotta become a top litigator to show them what's what I guess.

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17 minutes ago, pzabbythesecond said:

Thanks everyone. I appreciate the help and support. A shitty day. But they're bound to happen. Just gotta become a top litigator to show them what's what I guess.

Even good litigators have off days!

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3 hours ago, pzabbythesecond said:

Title says it all. I'm pretty dumbfounded because it seemed like a strong try out. I'm not sure how many moots the school actually chose to participate in and how many people tried out, so that may have been why, but my school's administration doesn't care to release that information.

 

Now what? Forget about litigation? I have decent grades and an enrolled in some upper year litigation seminars. Should I bother applying to litigation boutiques? 

 

I may just be panicking. I don't know. Appreciate any and all advice. Thanks.

 Non issue...the selection process is extremely subjective. All about personal preference. 

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You’re probably ruined. 

Just kidding, chin up buddy. At my firm, nobody gave a damn about my moot performances once I started here. Im not even sure it came up in interviews. 

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3 hours ago, pzabbythesecond said:

Thanks everyone. I appreciate the help and support. A shitty day. But they're bound to happen. Just gotta become a top litigator to show them what's what I guess.

You forgot, after becoming a top litigator then tell them you're not making any donations nor supporting the law school, ever, because you weren't chosen for a moot team... :twisted:

But seriously, I knew multiple people who I knew would have been excellent competitive mooters, and went on to do litigation or administrative (tribunal) law, but weren't chosen because had an off day or selection biased towards factors that weren't reflective of ability to do well in competitive moots (or in litigation).

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Everyone has already said the same shit as I'm about to, but here goes anyway:

I didn't get selected for a moot, and I'm gonna be a litigator. Hell, it was the Bowman Tax Moot, and I'm going to be a TAX litigator. 

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Almost no one does a competitive moot. If you're at Osgoode, there are like 10-20 people who do the big moots, and 80-100 who get Bay St jobs. It's ridiculous to get stressed over moots.

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Just chiming in that it's not a deal breaker at all. At my firm, moots are considered on par with, if not slightly below, clinics in terms of demonstrating litigation experience/interest. Upper year litigation seminars would probably do the job of conveying interest well enough. Don't sweat it.

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6 minutes ago, barelylegal said:

Just chiming in that it's not a deal breaker at all. At my firm, moots are considered on par with, if not slightly below, clinics in terms of demonstrating litigation experience/interest. Upper year litigation seminars would probably do the job of conveying interest well enough. Don't sweat it.

A clinic where you get real litigation experience is worth several times a moot.

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2 minutes ago, Jaggers said:

A clinic where you get real litigation experience is worth several times a moot.

True, but whether someone participating in a clinic actually gets "real litigation experience" can vary pretty wildly depending on the particular student and clinic. I'm speaking on average.

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Obviously! That's what you talk about during interviews...

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Moots are more about what you can put on your resume. Getting picked means you beat out some very capable classmates. If you then win an award at the moot, you have beat out some of the top law students in the country. 

Clinic work is more about demonstrating your commitment to and experience with a particular type of client.

Neither really tells you much about whether you will be a good litigator.

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Thanks all, I appreciate it. I'm enrolled in an upper year litigation seminar. Quebec bar limits what schools can offer in terms of clinic experience so I opted not to apply to the ones being offered. I felt more value with taking some black letter law courses (since I don't have a full year's worth of credits left). 

 

This may all end up better anyway. I wanted to moot. But the faculty really shit the bed on the selection process this year and it seems it was just shambles (not because they didn't pick me, but other stuff I won't get into here). And without a moot it means my winter semester ends up more relaxed than it would have been otherwise. And maybe I finally manage to land an RA position. 

 

Appreciate it everyone. You made a shitty day go by smooth.

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