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Gerwulf

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Hi all. 

Following a moderator request, I created this thread. Please feel free to share without restriction here, and let's keep the ''Admitted thread'' cleaner from now on.

Thank you all. 

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Posted (edited)

I think the acceptance/waitlist/rejected threads should have a degree of flexibility. Is it great to be able to easily find stats? Sure. Is there a benefit of hearing more details about past application experiences? Absolutely.

I used this forum a lot to calculate/guess my chances and I found the 'side conversations' very helpful. Knowing details about application timelines, even if they are anecdotal, is great and this information is usually found in the side conversations, not just the one admitted post. I'm not going to PM someone that posted an acceptance 5 years ago, so its great when someone asks a question and it's answered on the thread. I found this information helpful in all the admissions threads going back to late 2000s, and they were worth scrolling past to gather stats.

I guess a good example of this would be my last post asking someone how they found out their reference file was blank (UO waitlist). I think this resulted in a moderator msging me which I found odd. I think knowing the answer would be helpful to future applicants looking at this forum. 

Edited by WindsorHopeful
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I'm a cegep applicant, my request is still on ready for review state. I haven't been call for any interview. 

At this point I'm starting to think that they forget to give me a proper answer (accepted, refused, waitlisted)

 

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1 hour ago, Lampadaire said:

I'm a cegep applicant, my request is still on ready for review state. I haven't been call for any interview. 

At this point I'm starting to think that they forget to give me a proper answer (accepted, refused, waitlisted)

 

Same. I just checked minerva and my cegep send my new transcripts from this semester. I don't know if it is a good thing or not.

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Posted (edited)

To clarify and without stirring the pot (not my intention), I would like to apologize to for the one-sentence-comment that I made that caused a lot of ruckus on the acceptance thread.  To clarify, I made the comment because of the haha that was followed in the same sentence.   

If my comment warranted the replies that followed then I suppose I have different logic and/or lack of sense of humor.  Tough love was also mentioned.    Regardless, awesome news for that person and they are right with their wisdom:  sometimes Plan Bs and Plan Cs are better than Plan As.    All the best to both of us.  :-)  

 

Edited by WaitingOnTheHorizon
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Hey guys! 

Are there any other regular category applicants still "ready for review"? 

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19 hours ago, Lampadaire said:

I'm a cegep applicant, my request is still on ready for review state. I haven't been call for any interview. 

At this point I'm starting to think that they forget to give me a proper answer (accepted, refused, waitlisted)

 

@Lampadaire @mademoiselle

The process of narrowing down 2000+ (very) competitive applications to +-180 admissions takes a lot of time. That being said, they don't leave or forget anyone behind. Good or bad, your time will come. Don't worry, don't lose hope.

Bonne chance! :) 

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48 minutes ago, Gerwulf said:

The process of narrowing down 2000+ (very) competitive applications to +-180 admissions takes a lot of time. That being said, they don't leave or forget anyone behind. Good or bad, your time will come. Don't worry, don't lose hope.

This really puts it all in perspective. It's kind of scary that the acceptance rate is less than 10%. Other law schools are probably hitting a similar ratio, too. It also seems to get more and more competitive each year. 

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52 minutes ago, jan said:

It's kind of scary that the acceptance rate is less than 10%. 

It is, but once again, try not to worry too much, as it won't help you get in whatsoever. It will rather simply affect your overall well being.

I normally don't generalize, but I feel comfortable saying that law school is very stressful in general for almost everyone. As law students, we somehow have to learn to live with that stress at the back of our heads, trying not to let it affect us too dramatically so we can perform. I would suggest you try seeing this waiting period as a good time to practice coping with stress. BTW, I'm not trying to be patronizing at all with this suggestion and I really hope you don't feel I am. I just don't want you guys to torture yourselves with the possibility of a rejection, like I know a lot of applicants do.

Your mental health is and will always be more important than attending any law school.

1 hour ago, jan said:

It also seems to get more and more competitive each year. 

I can't really confirm or infirm, but I would be more surprised if the opposite were true. 

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Posted (edited)
3 hours ago, Gerwulf said:

It is, but once again, try not to worry too much, as it won't help you get in whatsoever. It will rather simply affect your overall well being.

I normally don't generalize, but I feel comfortable saying that law school is very stressful in general for almost everyone. As law students, we somehow have to learn to live with that stress at the back of our heads, trying not to let it affect us too dramatically so we can perform. I would suggest you try seeing this waiting period as a good time to practice coping with stress. BTW, I'm not trying to be patronizing at all with this suggestion and I really hope you don't feel I am. I just don't want you guys to torture yourselves with the possibility of a rejection, like I know a lot of applicants do.

Your mental health is and will always be more important than attending any law school.

Thankfully, I've somehow managed to already receive an offer. Regardless, this is generally good advice. Obsessing over a decision that's entirely in somebody else's hands is definitely neither emotionally sustainable nor productive.

That said, I would imagine that the stress of law school is very different from the existential dread of indefinitely suspending future plans (as well as, for many candidates, their entire self-worth) while waiting on an incalculably probable outcome of what is often perceived as the culmination of a lifetime of dreaming and hard work. I'd assume that the vast majority of people who are academically and/or professionally successful enough to consider applying to law school have successfully found a way to navigate constant pressure to perform. It's the anxiety over not having that performance rewarded (in a specific, life-changing way) that drives people to freak out over law school admissions.

The fact that hard work isn't guaranteed to pay off is a reality that all high-achievers must eventually crash face-first into. That's the looming risk of investing your entire life and identity into stacks of paper, as many law school applicants do. It's scary to recognize that handing off a meticulously curated CV or transcript isn't a transaction (as precedent outcomes would generally suggest), it's a gamble. That's why I find the numbers unsettling. 

Edited by jan
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Posted (edited)

I have a GPA and am trying to calculate Percentage using this link . My school has A B C D. What would that be in percentage ?

Is A a 100, B a 74, C a 55 and D a 50 looks horribly wrong to me ? WIth this scale I am getting a percentage of 40%... no way. My real GPA is actually pretty decent.

Edited by analyst

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18 hours ago, jan said:

It's the anxiety over not having that performance rewarded (in a specific, life-changing way) that drives people to freak out over law school admissions.

Jan, I warn you to temper your expectations. There are certainly similar situations of wanting something, working hard for It, and not getting it - after law school. Much in the same way it is before law school. Some people's dreams to work for Henein never materializes. Or they never get to work on cross border transactions in NY. Getting in is just the beginning.

 

Learning to deal with stress and not knowing is every day life in this profession. It's why we get the privileges we do. We are burdened with that responsibility (not that other professions don't suffer similarly, or that law is particularly special). It's a good skill to develop.

 

However this is not to marginalize applicants' experiences. I remember it, and it wasn't fun. Good luck to all.

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1 hour ago, analyst said:

I have a GPA and am trying to calculate Percentage using this link . My school has A B C D. What would that be in percentage ?

Is A a 100, B a 74, C a 55 and D a 50 looks horribly wrong to me ? WIth this scale I am getting a percentage of 40%... no way. My real GPA is actually pretty decent.

International school right? Did you get a WES report? 

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, pzabbythesecond said:

Jan, I warn you to temper your expectations. There are certainly similar situations of wanting something, working hard for It, and not getting it - after law school. Much in the same way it is before law school. Some people's dreams to work for Henein never materializes. Or they never get to work on cross border transactions in NY. Getting in is just the beginning.

 

Learning to deal with stress and not knowing is every day life in this profession. It's why we get the privileges we do. We are burdened with that responsibility (not that other professions don't suffer similarly, or that law is particularly special). It's a good skill to develop.

 

However this is not to marginalize applicants' experiences. I remember it, and it wasn't fun. Good luck to all.

Oh yeah, I'm not at all trying to imply that getting into law school is some sort of gateway into a stable and fulfilling life, or even career. I don't believe whatsoever that getting into law school eliminates or even mitigates any kind of uncertainty about the future. I'm sorry if I came off as naive or arrogant in that regard. That wasn't my intention at all. At the risk of getting overly personal, I honestly have zero concrete academic or professional ambitions or expectations right now. I know that it's very probable that law school isn't right for me. I kind of applied and got in as a fluke.  

I definitely recognize that uncertainty is a constant in life. Posts in the articling students' subforum here demonstrate that the ride never ends. I would wager that anticipation and uncertainty aren't the most common stressors that people face directly because of law school and as lawyers, though. Maybe law students and lawyers face those sources of anxiety more than other professionals do, but who knows.

I was just trying to express how an all-or-nothing attitude might convince someone that getting into law school is the be-all and end-all of their entire life. Of course, that mindset is not realistic; that's what is unhealthy about it and the anxiety that it generates. I do believe that the only way that many people, particularly high-achieving, goal-oriented people, can overcome that way of thinking is by learning the hard way that accomplishing a goal as complex as landing a specific job is not a predictable or linear journey where good intentions and outputs are always rewarded. The application cycle represents one such critical moment where somebody might have to come face-to-face with that reality, possibly for the first time. 

 

Edited by jan
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19 hours ago, jan said:

It's the anxiety over not having that performance rewarded (in a specific, life-changing way) that drives people to freak out over law school admissions.

54 minutes ago, pzabbythesecond said:

Learning to deal with stress and not knowing is every day life in this profession. It's why we get the privileges we do. We are burdened with that responsibility (not that other professions don't suffer similarly, or that law is particularly special). It's a good skill to develop.

Hi @jan, and sorry for the delay.

Although I understand your points 100% (I was in your shoes too at one point!), I have to agree with @pzabbythesecond's intervention. Law is a very stressful domain from A(dmission) to Z, and the #1 best advice I can give to anyone starting in the legal field is to start learning now how to cope with stress, no matter its intensity or its source. Being able to neutralize stress is not only a good law student quality, it's a good human quality.

To pick on your point, I too have worked really hard during my college & first undergrad so I could get into law school. I had no social life and was working really intensely from 6-7 am to 10-11 pm every single day for years so I could secure a GPA that would in turn get a seat into a top law school (I was initially aiming for Harvard or Yale, but eventually decided on McGill for obvious financial reasons). My point is I also experienced the fear of not seeing all the sacrifices I made since I first started my higher education. I know what it is. I know how you are feeling and I know it is horrible. However, just as @pzabbythesecond stated, getting in is only the begging of the game.

We know all of you guys have worked incredibly hard to be where you are today. Simply facing the possibility of being admitted means you sacrificed and worked a lot. However, once you will actually be in law school, you'll still have to work and sacrifice a lot more. At one point you'll dream of working for X or Y firm or employer, and there's a big chance someone else gets your dream job. It's sad, but that's unfortunately how it is. If you do lose your seat, you have to keep your chin up and immediately start fighting for another instead of letting the bad news destroy you.

The competition is very intense in the law domain, and you're competing with highly competent players. I basically was at the top of my program during my first degree, and was literally embarrassed when I first started law school because I felt everybody else was so much smarter than me. I felt incredibly average and it hurt my ego really bad. However, that's just how it is. Everybody is crazy smart. 

Keep in mind that you are in that pool of incredibly smart applicants and are competing against them for a seat. That mere fact means you are also incredibly smart. I know waiting on an admission is extremely stressful, but we can't control that waiting period or the admission committee whatsoever. The only thing we can try and control is our mental reactions to the situation we are facing, and this very fact is the reason for my previous comment. While waiting, our stress is the only thing we can control. It is our choice whether we decide to control it or let it control us. In my book, no stress, no matter its source, should take over your mental state and overall well being. We're human beings before being law school applicants or students. Let's not forget it. 

In any case, I am really happy to know you have secured a seat :) Congratulations on your admission :) Just to double check, were you admitted to McGill, or to another university? If you have any question whatsoever regarding law school, please feel free to ask here, or send me a private message. It will be a great pleasure to help you as best as I can. 

I hope you have a nice day and sorry once again for the delay in responding. All the best :) 

 

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Posted (edited)
21 minutes ago, jan said:

Oh yeah, I'm not at all trying to imply that getting into law school is some sort of gateway into a stable and fulfilling life, or even career. I don't believe whatsoever that getting into law school eliminates or even mitigates any kind of uncertainty about the future. I'm sorry if I came off as naive or arrogant in that regard. That wasn't my intention at all. At the risk of getting overly personal, I honestly have zero concrete academic or professional ambitions or expectations right now. I know that it's very probable that law school isn't right for me. I kind of applied and got in as a fluke.  

I definitely recognize that uncertainty is a constant in life. Posts in the articling students' subforum here demonstrate that the ride never ends. I would wager that anticipation and uncertainty aren't the most common stressors that people face directly because of law school and as lawyers, though. Maybe law students and lawyers face those sources of anxiety more than other professionals do, but who knows.

I was just trying to express how an all-or-nothing attitude might convince someone that getting into law school is the be-all and end-all of their entire life. Of course, that mindset is not realistic; that's what is unhealthy about it and the anxiety that it generates. I do believe that the only way that many people, particularly high-achieving, goal-oriented people, can overcome that way of thinking is by learning the hard way that accomplishing a goal as complex as landing a specific job is not a predictable or linear journey where good intentions and outputs are always rewarded. The application cycle represents one such critical moment where somebody might have to come face-to-face with that reality, possibly for the first time. 

 

No worries friend. Also, you getting in was no fluke :) .

Edited by pzabbythesecond

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23 hours ago, Gerwulf said:

I normally don't generalize, but I feel comfortable saying that law school is very stressful in general for almost everyone. As law students, we somehow have to learn to live with that stress at the back of our heads, trying not to let it affect us too dramatically so we can perform. I would suggest you try seeing this waiting period as a good time to practice coping with stress. 

This is something I'm learning to get used to as well. There is some measure of comfort knowing that others are in the same boat and that the support and advice we get here and elsewhere often comes from a place of empathy. 

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