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1L Grades Feedback For NY

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15 minutes ago, Trew said:

Admittedly, I am not the person to be giving advice on this. The only experience I have is applying to 30 or so firms.

Nowhere does it specify a cut-off, at least in my research, but some of the directors of student programs have alluded to an A- cut-off. 

if that's the case I'm hoping the criteria is a bit difference after a few years of practice

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5 minutes ago, Disputes said:

if that's the case I'm hoping the criteria is a bit difference after a few years of practice

I expect it is.

I should also qualify my last post with the student director that gave me the most direct information RE grades was from Schiff Hardin, one of the smallest NY firms and presumably with the highest grade cut-offs.

Edited by Trew

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23 minutes ago, Trew said:

I expect it is.

I should also qualify my last post with the student director that gave me the most direct information RE grades was from Schiff Hardin, one of the smallest NY firms and presumably with the highest grade cut-offs.

Yeah and I know there's really prestigious shops like Weil etc. with very high grade cut-offs, there are firms like that everywhere - I'm not that naïve!

I definitely just want to get a sense of how it is more generally, whether some firms look for other things, etc.

When I was living in London UK, before having even gone to law school, I got interviews at national, international, AND American firms in London (some based in NY). They were going off my MA (high standing from a good UK school) and my undergrad transcripts (which weren't that great but a sharp upturn to all A's and A-'s the last two years). I didn't end up getting a job there mainly because I got into law school Canada and decided to move home (I think the CDN JD is much more valuable than the UK training but that's just my opinion). Anyways, I was pretty surprised to have gotten those kinds of interviews, didn't think I had the grades for them. I really like living abroad and wouldn't mind trying New York eventually, or maybe going back to London...anyways I digress :). If anyone knows about what it takes to go to NY, just let me know.

 

Edit: I wasn't special for getting interviews without having gone to law school - that's just how it largely works if you didn't do an LLB

Edited by Disputes

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13 minutes ago, Disputes said:

Yeah and I know there's really prestigious shops like Weil etc. with very high grade cut-offs, there are firms like that everywhere - I'm not that naïve!

I only meant to express that what I was told by one student director is likely not representative of all firms' hiring criteria. 

13 minutes ago, Disputes said:

my MA (high standing from a good UK school) and my undergrad transcripts (which weren't that great but a sharp upturn to all A's and A-'s the last two years). 

Most NY firms do not want to see undergraduate/graduate transcripts - I only sent 2/30. But again, this may be different for someone already practicing. 

Edited by Trew
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4 minutes ago, Trew said:

I only meant to express that what I was told by one student director is likely not representative of all firms' hiring criteria. I know :)

Most NY firms do not want to see undergraduate/graduate transcripts - I only sent 2/30. But again, this may be different for someone already practicing. Yeah I was just kind of rambling about how I was surprised at what NY firms in London look for

Would also be curious to know about how easy it is to write the NY bar after a few years of ON practice. More specifically, do a couple years of practice instill a kind of confidence/knowledge that makes studying for/writing the NY bar easier, even though the law is different? Forgive me if I sound ignorant...

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if that's the case I'm hoping the criteria is a bit difference after a few years of practice

Grades may not matter as much but it's likely to be more difficult to get a job outside of the typical recruit. Every Canadian I know who has gone to NY, has done so through the 2L recruit, with the exception of those who are further into their career, mostly partners, who transfer to their firm's NY office.

One thing that is rarely mentioned here, and I'm not sure why that is, but students who truly want to work in NY from a Canadian law school should definitely do a clerkship. U.S. firms love clerkships and you will get a huge bonus every year by having done that clerkship.

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Hmm, I think there are probably good reasons to do a clerkship, especially if you want to be a litigator, but the clerkship bonus is definitely a one-time thing and I think some firms have cut back on doing it at all. The clerkship bonus is also not enough to make you whole for having foregone the year of US biglaw income. Again not that people who are interested shouldn’t do a clerkship but don’t do it as, like, a financial investment. 

Edited by NYCLawyer
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54 minutes ago, NYCLawyer said:

Hmm, I think there are probably good reasons to do a clerkship, especially if you want to be a litigator, but the clerkship bonus is definitely a one-time thing and I think some firms have cut back on doing it at all. The clerkship bonus is also not enough to make you whole for having foregone the year of US biglaw income. Again not that people who are interested shouldn’t do a clerkship but don’t do it as, like, a financial investment. 

I think Erin was speaking from the context of having not gotten into a NYC firm through the 2L recruit, but still looking to lateral later.

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2 minutes ago, pzabbythesecond said:

I think Erin was speaking from the context of having not gotten into a NYC firm through the 2L recruit, but still looking to lateral later.

Yeah I wasn’t trying to say doing a clerkship is a bad idea, just explaining how the clerkship bonus works. The bonus is also a coming-off-your-clerkship bonus, not something you can cash in if you do clerkship->firm->lateral as far as I know. 

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6 hours ago, erinl2 said:

 

 

Grades may not matter as much but it's likely to be more difficult to get a job outside of the typical recruit. Every Canadian I know who has gone to NY, has done so through the 2L recruit, with the exception of those who are further into their career, mostly partners, who transfer to their firm's NY office.

One thing that is rarely mentioned here, and I'm not sure why that is, but students who truly want to work in NY from a Canadian law school should definitely do a clerkship. U.S. firms love clerkships and you will get a huge bonus every year by having done that clerkship.

I was networking for the NY recruit recently, and I was actually surprised by the number of associates who didn't get jobs in 2L and instead transferred as an associate. The vast majority of Canadians are likely (almost certainly) people that went in the 2L or 3L recruits, but it certainly doesn't seem impossible to head south as an associate. 

Granted, those people were invariably from top-tier Canadian law firms (Davies and Blakes were the most common) and were doubtlessly very smart. They likely would have been competitive for NY in the recruits (or just outside the picture) and ended up heading there later. I don't know how well someone from a smaller firm or with lower grades would have fared. 

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I was networking for the NY recruit recently, and I was actually surprised by the number of associates who didn't get jobs in 2L and instead transferred as an associate. The vast majority of Canadians are likely (almost certainly) people that went in the 2L or 3L recruits, but it certainly doesn't seem impossible to head south as an associate. 

  That's virtually just what I said!

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